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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8801 words || 
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1. McKane, Rachel. and McCammon, Holly. "Why We March: The Role of Collective Identity and Grievances in the 2017 Women’s March" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380244_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On January 21 2017, millions of people participated in the Women’s march in locations across the world. The present study uses social movement theory on strain and grievances, resource mobilization, and political opportunity structures to explore what factors led to the occurrence of a Women’s march as well as what factors predict the number of marchers in major metropolitan areas. The findings indicate that the presence of organizational resources, such as the presence of a Black Lives Matter chapter increases the likelihood of a march occurring. Similarly, the presence of a Pride march is associated with an increase in the percentage of marchers. Marches were less likely to occur in areas with a high percentage of African Americans and more likely to occur in places with a higher percentage of Hispanics and immigrants, but none of these measures impacts the number of marchers. An increase in college education and a decrease in manufacturing employment leads to a higher percentage of marches. These findings indicate that while resources and political opportunities are imperative for movement emergence and participation, grievances and collective identity surrounding race and class may play a larger role in explaining the Women’s March.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Park, Esul. "So, “How” did the Women’s March Succeed? Women’s March Facebook as an Evidence From Resource Mobilization Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1365612_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Women’s March starting from a post on Facebook is recorded as the largest single-day protest in the U.S. history. Although existing studies about social media in political participation has investigated the diverse aspects of social media, there is a remaining question of how social media mobilizes resources from the fragmented online public. The present study conducts a qualitative textual analysis of the 274 posts on the Women’s March Facebook page to understand how different types of recourses were attained for the March. With the use of resources mobilization theory (Edwards & Gillham, 2013) as a theoretical framework, three themes were found to be a distinctive feature of the March: transparency, spreadable and participatory media, and legitimacy of the March. Each theme with illustrative examples will be discussed.

2007 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7680 words || 
Info
3. Bowler, Shaun., Pedraza, Francisco. and Segura, Gary. "The Efficacy and Trust of Juan Q. Public: How the Immigration Marches Reflect Surprising Support for American Institutions of Governance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, La Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 08, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p176451_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We examine the general orientations of Latinos to the US political system. Specifically, we determine the degree to which Latino or Hispanic residents of the United States find government worthy of their trust, believe they have an influence on the direction of policy, and act to shape policy outcomes. Using survey data from a variety of recent surveys at the national level and within California, we find that immigrants have a surprisingly positive view of the US government and their role in the political system, higher in fact than even some native-born Anglo citizens. Moreover, that enthusiasm translates into considerably greater confidence in the efficacy of direct political action, in this case specifically referring to the marches of Spring 2006. We discuss the implications of these findings to Latino political incorporation and the future of the American polity.

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