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2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Kato, Yuki. and McKinney, Laura. "To market, to market: Low-income residents’ reactions to a local food market and its products" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/VND.OPENXMLFORMATS-OFFICEDOCUMENT.WORDPROCESSINGML.DOCUMENT>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the emerging critique of the alternative food movement’s inability to engage poor, minority communities, previous scholarship on this topic have not closely examined how the marginal population in the city actually views the movement. Based on a semi-experimental study that offers free locally-grown produce to 30 low-income African American households in New Orleans, this paper examines their evaluations of experiences in visiting the neighborhood food market and consuming the locally-grown produce. The findings challenge presumptions from previous studies about the factors that contribute to the limited participation by the low-income minority population in the movement, namely economic, human, and cultural capital. Instead, we find our sample of low-income, minority residents shows high levels of human and cultural capital regarding the purchase and consumption of locally-grown produce. However, we identify limited social capital within the neighborhood as posing a unique constraint to the market’s ability to serve the surrounding community, in addition to the socio-geographic constraints.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7309 words || 
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2. Pulver, Simone. "To Market, To Market: Building carbon markets in Brazil and India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p507576_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The functioning of markets is contingent on solving three market problems: 1) commodification, i.e. creating the commodity to be traded ; 2) market entry, i.e. attracting sufficient numbers of buyers and sellers to a new market, and 3) market stability, i.e. a market condition in which relationships among market actors and with market regulators are regularized and predictable. This framework is used to analyze the creation of new markets for carbon emissions reductions in the Brazilian and Indian sugar sector. Interview and archival data demonstrate that while problems of market entry have been solved by networks of carbon consultants, the commodification of carbon and the development of stable market relationships between market actors and regulators have proved more challenging. The failure to solve the commodification and stability problems has undermined efforts to build new carbon markets.

2009 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 215 words || 
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3. Krug, Barbara. and Hendrischke, Hans. "Why a market place is not a market. A Market Design - perspective on China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 16, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305119_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper introduces a new economic multidisciplinary approach which by combining institutional and behavioural economics, and organisational psychology and new methodology, such as game theory, lab and experimental economics, supplements the conventional theories on the emergence of markets. By showing that a multitude of different Market Designs (MD) are compatible with the notion of functioning, competitive markets, the MD-perspective focuses on specific market places. Firms and local administrators, judges and politicians all are not only “market partners’ but those whose interaction and behaviour contributes to a specific market design. Differences in the allocation of decision making power, coordination devices employed and transaction-time specific imperfections, lead to differences in design, and indicates whether a specific design promises robust and stable markets. Taking the MD-perspective for examining
China’s economic transformation shows why and how the emergence of specific market places depends more on the informal interaction of in particular firms and local government agencies than on formal institutions and the law. The MD-perspective further identifies imperfectedness and instability which are market place specific and are a further cause to the variety of different market designs and organisational forms we observe across but also within economic sectors. Ultimately, the MD-perspective offers additional insights into the functioning of markets in general and market places in China in particular.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9402 words || 
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4. Kahl, Steven. and Phillips, Damon. "Market Crises and (Re)establishment of Market Order: Sociological Investigation of the “Fair Market” Rule Implementation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2007, FASB implemented the FAS 157, or the “Fair Market Rule” which required firms to categorize their financial assets and liabilities into a three level fair value hierarchy. Since its implementation, this rule has been closely associated with the ensuing economic crisis. Consequently, we view this rule as a disruption to an existing market order and examine how investment and commercial banks implemented FAS 157 as a means to understand how market order gets established. Various perspectives in organizational theory propose different social factors that can explain how market order is established which require market actors to look to different areas within the market for cues. We suspect that these mechanisms occur simultaneously but some dominate over others. By considering the different allocations across the fair market hierarchy, we observe variation in the level of convergence in the application of the rule – commercial banks are much more similar in their application than investment banks. Our early evidence suggests that for commercial banks market order is established through convergence and conformity, and that investment banks use FAS 157 to construct and maintain distinct identities and positions in a manner more akin to White’s (1981) market schedule conceptualization. Using content and network analyses alongside standard regression models common in financial accounting, we are investigating more specific mechanisms that produce the radically different types of market order for commercial and financial banks.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 258 words || 
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5. Carter, Betsy. "Politics and Quality Markets: Power, Market Organization, and the Construction of Status Markets in Comparative Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p731896_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the wine, fashion, coffee, art and olive oil markets—to name a few—one can observe a great price difference between “status market” products and “mass market” products. At the same time, consumers are frequently unable to detect qualitative differences between status and mass market products. This paper investigates how quality is defined, and who defines it. Most literature on the construction of status markets provides ample attention to economic sociology and to consumer theory, however, producer politics is largely neglected. I begin with an investigation of how actors within a supply chain address Akerloff’s “lemon problem”. How producers organize to solve the problem of quality uncertainty is, I argue, largely shaped by political factors, and these patterns of producer organization result in differentially constructed quality markets. Drawing on over 200 interviews with producers, experts, journalists and government officials in Italy, France, Germany and the United States, I compare the origins and consequences of producer-driven supply chain, vertically integrated firms, and demand-driven supply chains. I pose the following questions: Which actors achieve the legitimacy to define quality: “upstream” producers, brand-name merchandisers, retail chains, or independent experts, and why? And what is the relationship between these different “buyer-driven” and “market-driven” structures on consumer notions of quality? I conclude that patterns of producer organization drive 1) how the firm (or firms) constructs the notion of quality, 2) the extent to which a firm (or firms) can construct effective market protection from similar competitors, and 3) why firms and retailers act as “quality makers” (create demand) or “quality takers” (respond to demand).

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