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2018 - 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 82 words || 
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1. Viswanathan, Madhubalan., Arias, Robert. and Sreekumar, Arun. "Extreme Marketplace Exclusion in Subsistence Marketplaces: A Study in a Refugee Settlement in Nakivale, Uganda" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1372086_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Largely excluded from marketing and consumer behavior literature are individuals, consumers, entrepreneurs and communities in subsistence marketplaces. Research on marketplace exclusion has examined various aspects of exclusion. We leverage prior research and empirical data to identify a phenomenon we term ‘extreme marketplace exclusion.’ We conduct a qualitative study in a rural refugee settlement to delineate how four intersecting deprivations manifest to contribute to such exclusion. We also discuss three interrelated psychological consequences. We conclude with a discussion covering theoretical and practical implications.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 12 pages || Words: 3287 words || 
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2. Greenebaum, Jessica. "“It’s a Dog’s Life”: Elevating Status from Pet to “Fur Baby” in the Marketplace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106616_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Animals have always played a significant role in people’s lives. Lately, the technological and market economy has anthropomorphized dogs to human-like behavior, particularly to status of family member or child. This study expands upon the current studies on consumption and animals and society by exploring how human-canine relationships are anthropomorphized by a market culture at Three Dog Bakery. The type of person who attends Yappy Hour on a weekly basis has a unique and special type of connection with their dog that goes beyond most people’s relationships with dogs. Most of the dog lovers interviewed do not perceive their dogs as dogs; they are family members, best friends, and “fur babies.” These dog lovers also do not perceive themselves as dog owners; they are mothers and fathers. The social and market environment of Three Dog Bakery, not only reinforces their relationship with their dog, it shapes community, friendships, and personal identity.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 5779 words || 
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3. Park, Chan-Ung. "The Academic Marketplaces Revisited: the case of Korean Biochemists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104030_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines gendered nature of an academic job market in case of Korean academic biochemistry. I examine the factors that influence a Ph.D.’s chance to get a tenured-track job in a university. In particular, I compare male and female biochemists with same list of covariates such as age, academic performance, and prestige of graduate institutions to understand the role of gender on the success of academic job markets. The analysis shows the following results. First, including both male and female scientists, gender clearly influences a chance of getting a job. Second, separate models for male and female scientists show that academic performance and type of graduate institutions only affect female scientists. In other words, academic performance affects job market outcomes of only female scientists, not those of male scientists. Such results strongly suggests that gender is not just an important factor in academic job market, but the market itself is segmented along a gender line, thus, requiring analyzing different process for male and female scientists separately. It also emphasizes social embeddedness of academic job market in sciences.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 64 pages || Words: 25096 words || 
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4. Kaufmann, Chaim. "Iraq, Threat Inflation, and the Marketplace of Ideas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p74439_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars have long argued that the robust marketplace of ideas in mature democracies serves to help them avoid risky foreign policy adventures by weeding out policy proposals based on dubious justifications and claims based on dubious evidence. This paper examines the extent of the threat inflation and other myths of empire that accompanied the American invasion of Iraq and asks whether these should undercut our confidence in the virtues of the marketplace of ideas.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8088 words || 
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5. hallock, steve. "The 1980 Cleveland newspaper market revisited: Analysis finds vibrant agenda diversity, robust marketplace of ideas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p271658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A partial replication and reanalysis of the Cleveland newspaper market of 1980, prior to the closure of the Cleveland Press, differs with the conclusions of previous content analyses of two-daily communities that have become monopoly markets. A 1987 replication in Cleveland of a study of competitive newspaper markets in Canada found similar content in the surviving newspaper before and after the closure of its rival and similar content in the two competing newspapers before the closure. Citing professional newspaper routines, it found little benefit in the context of democratic marketplace of ideas theory. This reanalysis, which focuses more qualitatively on newspaper content, found instead a diverse marketplace of ideas and opinion that suggests a lively agenda-setting and ideological diversity that disappeared with the emergence of the monopoly market, to the detriment of the community and the democratic process.

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