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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 242 words || 
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1. Ould, Patricia. and Whitlow, Julie. "A Married Woman Is Not Always a Wife: Relationship Terms Used by Married Lesbians" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006772_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the use of relationship terms by married lesbians at a historical juncture where the long-standing definition of marriage is undergoing a sociocultural renegotiation across the United States. At this point in time in U. S. cultural history, when same-sex marriage is rapidly gaining acceptance, this research demonstrates the complexity of the use of the term wife and its alternates, such as partner or spouse, by married lesbians and shows how the use of certain relationship terms is tied to a variety of contextual factors that shape the identities of married lesbians. The data convincingly demonstrates both how the use of relationship terms is evolving and reveals the complexity of language use across social situations. Despite the positive trend toward eventual widespread acceptance of same-sex marriage, rejection and prejudice exists, and gender identity is complex. The study relies on analysis of both quantitative data from over 200 survey respondents and qualitative analysis based on grounded theory from interviews with 20 married lesbian couples of varying ages. Because Massachusetts was the first state to fully legalize same-sex marriage, the interviews and most of the surveys are from those living in Massachusetts. The data reveal that, even after more than 10 years of legal same-sex marriage, the use of the language associated with marriage is still fraught with complexity and burdened by the social and historical acceptance of gays and lesbians as part of the social fabric.

2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 101 words || 
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2. Epstein, Robyn. "Married Queers or Queer Married?: Reconsidering the Practice of Marriage From Queer Women’s Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572649_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Since the U.S. national consciousness took notice of same-sex marriage in 1994 (with the sympathetic Hawaiian Supreme Court ruling), law-making apparatuses have been publicly battling over the possibility of same-sex marriage. Likewise, queer communities have been arguing over the value or danger of same-sex marriage. In my study, I interviewed LGBTQ women, and discovered that many perceive the practice of same-sex marriage as a life-tool rather than as an ideology. They interpret “marriage” through their “queer” perspectives, not “queer” through “marriage.” This study analyzes the participants’ queer readings of marriage as resisting colonized imaginaries of the meaning of “marriage.”

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 4659 words || 
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3. Livingston, Gretchen. "Do Married Migrant Men Who Live with their Wives Have Higher Wages Than Married Migrant Men Who Don't?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108343_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: That married men earn more than single men is well established in the literature. What remains unclear, though, is the cause of this wage gap. I use fixed effects to examine how U.S. wages vary for two groups of married Mexican migrant men in the U.S.: those who are residing with their wives, and those who are not. Results will shed light on the importance of household specialization and employer discrimination in explaining the male wage premium to marriage.

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