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2014 - 38th Annual NCBS National Conference Words: 249 words || 
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1. Johnson, T.. "Crashing the Black Gender Party or Return of the Sacred Black Masculine: Historicizing Progressive Black Masculinities, Representation, and Black Masculinism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 38th Annual NCBS National Conference, Miami Marriott Dadeland Hotel, Miami, Florida, Mar 05, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p730745_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many Black males (young and old) have become apathetic about their options and future potential--something not often understood by those who don't share their experience, limited options, and social pressure to perform. Yet despite the opposition from society and the limited options for success, many Black men, by any means necessary, have gone to detrimental extremes to demonstrate a desirable masculinity that will bring about status, wealth, respect, and the affections and loyalty of their women. Gender, for Black men, has become a life or death issue, as many of our youth are drug-dealing and in gangs, many of our adults are incarcerated or are lifelong sexual play-boys, and many of our elders are dying too early from stress and health issues all due to one thing: trying live up to an unrealistic standard of "manhood" historically excluded from Black men, even in the contemporary world.

As a result, many Black males who've long tired of these confining definitions by others, now find ourselves on the precipice of change, for those who dare consider it. Should we abandon our definitions of manhood and create a new one? Will our families and communities support such an endeavor? Will society's educational, law enforcement, and employment institutions be willing to accept it? These are some of the challenging questions that many Black men are struggling to answer. The answers can't be explored, however, until Black men first learn to articulate their own experiences, in their voices, and with a new gender vocabulary.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Rodriguez, Nino. "Masculinity Habitus: The Socialization of Masculinity Ideologies for African American Adolescent Males" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122541_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hammond and Mattis (2005) pointed out that most of the studies that have been used to theorize about what it means to be a Black man have failed to question the meaning of manhood for all African American men with different backgrounds who undoubtedly encounter racism (p. 115). When it comes to looking at the African American males’ conception of manhood, there is a need for future research exploring the entire life span in order to get a better understanding of the socialization process that takes place as well as shifts in masculinity ideology that will occur throughout the course of a lifespan. It is necessary that we examine the socialization settings as much as the socialization process in order to full comprehend the influence that masculinity has during the adolescent stage of development. The purpose of this study is to explore the socialization of masculinity for African American adolescent males enrolled in a youth alternative education program in the Midwest. In order to explore such a phenomenon, the research design utilized qualitative methods, specifically the research conducted an observational case study (Bogdan & Biklen, 2011) composed of a questionnaire, participant observations, and focus groups to acquire natural, rich data that will provide insight as to how the participants: (1) define manhood (2) the social agents that have shaped their perception of what it means to be a man; and (3) the ways in which their masculinity ideology has impacted their lives thus far.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8302 words || 
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3. Wetzel, Dominic. "The Wounded Masculinities and Hegemonic Masculine Ideal of Late Capitalism and Third Wave, Catholic Charismatic Christianity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010643_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Examining recent charismatic masculinity manuals, including porn addiction testimonials and spiritual leadership manuals for men in the bedroom, this paper examines the articulation of the neoliberal charismatic/evangelical Hegemonic Masculine Ideal as a postmodern compensation for the wounded masculinities of Late Capitalism. At the same time, it examines the diffusion of the neoliberal, Spiritual Warfare rhetoric of demon-obsessed, Third Wave of Pentecostalism, sponsor of the Ugandan 'Kill the Gays' Bill and largest growing religious movement in the world, onto Catholicism via the Catholic charismatic movement.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Munsch, Christin. "Middle-Status Masculinity: A Theoretical Restatement and Empirical Demonstration of the Structure of Contemporary Masculinity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122342_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper addresses the theoretical structure of contemporary masculinity. To date, there are two streams of research that speak to this question. One contends that masculinities are arranged hierarchically with a dominant, culturally idealized form of masculinity exerting influence over other gender identities. The second contends that, at least in contemporary Anglo-American culture, two or more forms of masculinity co-exist that are organized horizontally without hierarchy or hegemony. In this paper, I present evidence garnered from an in-depth interview study of undergraduate men to develop a theoretical explanation—middle-status masculinity theory—that bridges these two models. This conceptualization of masculinity includes actors that fall into one of three classes—high-status, middle-status, and low-status—with some degree of permeability between each. Low-status actors, having effectively screened themselves out of consideration for inclusion in the highest ranks of masculinity, experience the most leeway to engage in non-hegemonic forms of masculinity. High-status actors have significant standing as men and are consequently also afforded some leeway as well. Middle-status actors face the strongest pressure to “do” gender. They are less secure than high-status actors in their identity as men, but still value traditional masculinity and fear disenfranchisement. In the second half of the paper, I describe a controlled laboratory study designed to empirically test hypotheses derived from middle-status masculinity theory.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Kramer, Brandon., Springer, Kristen. and Himmelstein, Mary. "Getting to the Heart of Masculinity Stressors: Masculinity Threats Induce Stress during a Speaking Task" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1249563_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Background. Previous work in masculinity studies has found that traditional masculinity ideals and behaviors play a part in higher rates of morbidity and mortality for men. Some studies also suggest that threatening men’s masculinity can be stressful. Over time, this stress can weigh on men’s cardiovascular system and contribute to men’s higher rates of cardiovascular health issues.

Purpose. The purpose of this study is to explore the possible cardiovascular health effect of masculinity threats by examining men’s heart rate variability reactivity (i.e. vagal withdrawal) to masculinity feedback on a social speaking task.

Methods. Two hundred and eighty-five undergraduate males were randomly assigned to one of six conditions during a laboratory-based speech task. They received one of two feedback types (masculinity or control) and one of three feedback levels (low, high, or dropping) in order to assess whether masculinity threats influence cardiovascular reactivity. Participants’ vagal withdrawal was assessed in response to the speech task.

Results. Men who receive low masculinity feedback during the speech task experienced more pronounced vagal withdrawal relative to those who received the control.

Conclusion. Masculinity threats can induce cardiovascular reactivity that may accumulate over the life course and contribute to men’s cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

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