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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,007 records.
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2009 - International Communication Association Words: 161 words || 
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1. Lang, Kurt. and Lang, Gladys. "Mass Society, Mass Culture, and Mass Communication: The Meanings of Mass" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297622_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In the 1950s the concept of mass, which has a long and respectable history, came under attack with Edward A. Shils and Daniel Bell in the vanguard. Criticisms drew on an accumulation of evidence from social science studies about the continuing significance of informal social relationships in modern society. This paper traces the varying definitions of "mass" back to their origins and to their underlying assumptions about the nature of changes attending industrialization and and advances in communication technology that made possible rapid transmission of a uniform content to a geographically dispersed audience. Much of the criticism of the concept of mass strikes us as misdirected, on the one side, at conservatives who fear the masses and, on the other, at the disdain felt mostly, but not exclusively, by neo-Marxist intellectuals toward the culture of the market place. When mass behavior is sociologically rather than ideologically defined, as it should be, its increasingly important role in contemporary life becomes unavoidably clear.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 68 words || 
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2. Tietjen, Grant. "A Theory of Socio-Political Effects of Mass Incarceration on the United States: Mass Correctional Reform Equals Mass Pro-Social Reform" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277421_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Mass incarceration incapacitates social productivity and limits opportunity for a large percentage of American citizens, including convicts, ex-convicts, and the family members of convicts and ex-convicts. Enacting policy which serves to de-stigmatize and re-integrate the formerly incarcerated into general population as fully restored citizens will function to break down obstacles to social equality, increasing access to education, employment, opportunity structures, and the reduction of negative social stigmas.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Words: 140 words || 
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3. Girginova, Katerina. "Theorizing Mass Secrecy and Mass Privacy Culture in the Digital Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713563_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Discussions about privacy and secrecy are often bound around the individual, yet a growing corpus of scholarship is urging for a (re)conceptualization of these notions as a collective fact. Using as a case study the dress rehearsal for the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics, the forerunner for what became the world’s largest media event and the first social media Games, I examine how social media were used to engineer a mass secret. By studying the deployment of the Twitter hashtag #savethesurprise, which was used to create and sustain a general boundary between the 62,000 ‘insider’ rehearsal spectators and the general ‘outsider’ public, I ask: how does organizational and digital culture shape notions about mass secrecy and mass privacy? And conversely, look at how issues of mass secrecy and mass privacy can inform our organizational policies regarding digital practices.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 23 pages || Words: 10201 words || 
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4. Moe, Espen. "Institutions of Mass Deception: The Arrival of Mass Politics and the Perversion of the Public Sphere" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179512_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We are used to thinking about the public sphere as spreading much more easily in the Netherlands and Great Britain than in typically Continental European powers like France and Germany. While this was true with respect to the early and somewhat elitist brand of the public sphere arising and spreading in the century preceding the French Revolution, this is not equally true if we shift the focus to the mid-to-late 19th century. Instead, during this period, early runners like Great Britain and latecomers like Germany exhibit major similarities. Thus, the paper argues that the introduction of mass politics in Western Europe through franchise extensions in Britain and the gradual introduction of parliamentary features to the German system, had significant effects on the institution of popular legitimacy, manifesting itself through a considerable deterioration of the public sphere, which lasted for several decades in all three countries. The paper aims to show this through data collected from parliamentary debates, election campaigns, newspaper articles, and not the least foreign policy rhetoric by influential state and non-state actors. One important consequence of the deterioration of the public sphere was a recourse to political demagoguery from the ruling elites, seeking to preserve popular legitimacy by using foreign politics to attract the masses. Hence, the late 19th century saw imperialism and foreign policy strife between major European powers, as the introduction of mass politics meant an end to the relative calm of the elitist consensus of the Concert of Europe and the introduction of a foreign policy paradigm where mass politics and nationalism created a far more volatile foreign policy environment.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 347 words || 
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5. Bolin, Goran. "Rethinking Mass Communication in an Age of Mass Personalisation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1104036_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Mass communication, mess media and, accordingly, mass audiences, it has been argued, are concepts that are since long been outdated. On technological grounds, because the digital media distribute content across several technological platforms, where the media users are supposedly more in control over their own media consumption to the contrary of the uniform mass audience address performed by traditional mass media. On theoretical grounds, Raymond William’s famous argument that ‘there are no masses, only ways of seeing people as masses’ also made the concept of mass communication less popular among media researchers with a culturally oriented profile. In the void following from this conceptual loss, new concepts such as ‘personal media’, ‘me media’, etc., have been launched. However, the pronouncement of the death of mass communication and its related concepts might have been too hasty, and although there are distinctive differences in the operations of digital, personal media, there are also still stark similarities between the ways in which the mass media and the new digital ‘personal media’ work in relation to the media users or audiences.

This paper argues that the ‘mass’ concept is now entering its third phase: Where the first wave of mass culture critique related to industrialism and urbanization at the turn of the century 1900, and launched by scholars such as Le Bon and Ortega y Gasset, the second wave was formed in relation to the rise of television and the mass broadcast audience, and theorized by Wright, Lazarsfeld, Riesman and others. The third, personalized mass, has been formed through the use of Big Data and algorithmic surveillance of the audience and de-individualized business models. The third mass discourse still relates to data produced by the aggregation of media user behavior, although it also deviates from the second mass in terms of the characteristics of the data produced, where predictive analytics are more concerned with correlational statistics of behavior, than with the social character of the user. Paradoxically this means that the ‘mass personalisation’ adopted by the media industry is less personal than the mass communication strategy used at the second mass moment.

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