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Showing 1 through 5 of 25 records.
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2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 3680 words || 
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1. Fleck, Matthes., Fieseler, Johannes. and Meckel, Miriam. "Microdialogues in Cyberspace: McDonalds Blogging Efforts in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility Online" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297571_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article presents an explorative case study exploring McDonald's "Open for discussion" blog dedicated to documenting the company's social and environmental efforts. Our investigation into this new form of organization-stakeholder interaction is based on two complementary research approaches: webmetrics, to describe the general popularity of the blog itself and the use social network analysis to investigate how well the blog is connected with the overall blogosphere. Our results indicate that companies can reach highly engaged stakeholders via weblogs, however, only a few actors were actually involved into each single discussion. We therefore introduce the concept of online micro-dialogues as proxies for numerous face-to-face communications about similar issues between the company and its stakeholder base and which might be an avenue to better understand how organizations interact online with their stakeholders.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 94 words || 
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2. Sarran, Marina. "Everyone Says I Love You: Reflections on the McDonaldization of Romance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study describes American dating practices in cross-cultural perspective. Focusing on the conspicuous and widespread presence of dating as a topic in manuals, books, TV, and all media in American popular culture, I analyze linkages between the sociology of emotions and the sociology of consumption, as they appear inextricably conjoined in the American culture and landscape. The findings reveal the cross-cultural implications of deeply embedded and conflicting attitudes and values regarding consumerism and consumption, and the overarching power of an American bottom-line-culture able to infiltrate and penetrate the deepest recesses of the heart.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5478 words || 
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3. Lorenzen, Janet. "Global Consumption: McDonaldization or Multicultural Hybridization?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Does globalization destroy culture? This paper attempts to summarize and critique the disparate perspectives on the interaction between globalization, consumption, and culture. Both McDonaldization and hybridization are accurate representations of what is happening in the world today. Yet, both viewpoints find support by looking at only part of the picture of globalization. McDonaldization is an oversimplified theory that has several theoretical and empirical weaknesses: assumptions about the nature of culture and authenticity, the weakness of the local, the margin/center relationship between the global and the local, and spatial (as well as consumer choice) determinism. While the theory of hybridization may exaggerate the power of culture in the face of Western profit seeking and neoliberal tendencies. By pointing out the serious flaws in these competing explanations I hope to indicate a more useful direction for the study of globalization and consumption which neglects neither the dynamism of culture nor the power of political economy.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5440 words || 
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4. Wall, Melissa. "“Asterix repelling the invader”: How the media covered Jose Bove and the McDonalds incident" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113049_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This qualitative frame analysis examines wire service coverage by the Associated Press and Agence France Press of Jose Bove’s ransacking of McDonalds and Bove’s subsequent trial. Analysis suggests that both services covered the Bove incidents similarly, downplaying the broader context of corporate capitalism and the global movement to resist it while elevating Bove to be a key representative of the movement. At the same time that they anointed Bove as a French icon (contributing to "Bovemania"), the wire services constructed a comical caricature of him, which ultimately discredits the activists and the movement he represents.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 7025 words || 
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5. Poznansky, Michael. "Incorporation Revisited: How Both the Heller and McDonald Courts Misconstrued the Second Amendment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455829_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As drafted, the Second Amendment was originally understood to serve as a bulwark against a tyrannical central government. The recent Supreme Court decision, McDonald v. Chicago, has not only misconstrued the entire history of the right to bear arms, but I contend that it has imposed an improper application of over eighty years of incorporation doctrine. Read in their proper historical context, the English Bill of Rights of 1689 through the writings of William Blackstone, all support the right to bear arms in the collective sense. A thorough review of treatises, letters, and influential commentary on the American Constitution reveal that the citizens of the founding generation and those in the decades following the codification of the Bill of Rights all understood the right to bear arms in the same light. The methodology employed by the McDonald Court forces an anachronistic analysis of the historical record, wrenching quotes from their context to support an unfounded, individualistic interpretation of the Second Amendment. This paper places the Second Amendment in its proper context, specifically focusing on the inherent tenet of collective security as it was originally understood by citizens and Framers alike. Utilizing incorporation criteria from Palko to Duncan, it is shown that the right to bear arms and the right of self-defense were merely a continuation of the federalism structure promised to the people. It is this communal right, not the individual one that is both “implicit in the concept of ordered liberty,” and “fundamental to the American scheme of justice.”

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