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2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 89 words || 
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1. Lall, Saurabh. "Measuring to Improve Vs. Measuring to Prove: Understanding Evaluation and Performance Measurement in Social Enterprise" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1033608_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is growing interest in the phenomenon of social enterprise around the world, and one of the key topics of discussion is the issue of measuring the social value created by these organizations. However, there is limited academic research on the evaluation and performance measurement practices of social enterprises. Given their dual priorities, what motivates social enterprises to measure their impact? This research examines the internal and external antecedents of these measurement practices using a novel dataset of 2014 early stage social enterprises, through the lens of organizational theory.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 146 words || 
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2. Holmes, Caitlin. "Agamben's Potentiality in Shakespeare's Measure for Measure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481968_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recent use of Giorgio Agamben's theory to consider Shakespeare's plays - i.e. Ken Jackson's recent analysis of King John - have relied almost exclusively upon Homo Sacer, a tendency no doubt due to Agamben's theorization of sovereignty lending itself conveniently to such arguments. Yet Agamben's other works, namely The Coming Community and Potentialities, offer a fruitful examination of self in a process of unfolding. Agamben's reconsideration of Aristotelian "potentiality," or the third space between existence and nothingness, suggests that humans are not necessarily trapped in a stable binary between being and not being. Measure for Measure provides a unique opportunity to intersect potentiality with an early modern dramatic representation of indeterminate subjectivity. I argue that each character of Measure for Measure occupies an "in-betweenness" in the process of coming to identity, which serves as the operating premise of the play and makes its dramatic closure possible.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6992 words || 
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3. Kang, Minjeong. and Yang, Sung-Un. "Measuring Social Media Credibility: A Study on a Measure of Blog Credibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p486778_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As individual members of publics now have greater expectations to have substantial interactions with organizations, especially by using the digital/social media, communication professionals have been looking for ways to enhance these interactions. Among various social media, this study limits its scope to blogs, which have been considered to be the most pertinent social medium used in the field of communication management. Previous research on blog credibility has reported limited reliability of measures, partly due to the use of general credibility measures that have been developed to assess credibility of traditional news media. This study has developed and validated a 14-item measure of blog credibility and by the usage of focus groups and a survey. This study also discusses the implications practical aspects of measuring blog credibility.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 255 words || 
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4. Fesmire, Marion. "Global Implementation of Assessment Instruments that Measure Literacy: Using Multiple Measures to Inform Policy and Classroom Instruction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635840_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The presentation focuses on developing countries and the issues in the acquisition of basic literacy skills in the early grades and the need for assessments that provide critical information about classroom practices and the learning environment. The importance of the use of assessments to inform instruction and to measure student progress has been well documented. Current literacy assessments include measures of acquisition of the research-based components of reading. As the data (e.g. EGRA) are analyzed it appears that, for many children, progress has been minimal. In order to further interpret the data on student outcomes, classroom observations can be an integral component of the process. The data from classroom observations , conducted in developing countries, has been negligible, sometimes anecdotal. Observational data can provide critical insight into factors that contribute to the lack of student progress. Observations can assess effective research-based indicators of the classroom environment, instructional practices and strategies , interactions and student engagement, types of materials used for instruction, and use of mother tongue vs. English for instruction and for classroom discussions. Without this information, it will be difficult to fully address the possible factors contributing to the lack of adequate progress in acquisition of basic literacy skills. The panel will present a conceptual framework and observation tool that can be used across countries to obtain data on student outcomes. Discussions will focus on how the results, combined with assessment data and issues can provide essential information when examining training programs, identify needed instructional support and materials, and inform policy.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 2345 words || 
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5. Roos, Jason. "Measuring Science or Religion? A Measurement Analysis of the NSF Sponsored Science Literacy Scale, 2006-2010" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p564434_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: High scientific literacy is widely considered a public good. Methods of assessing public scientific knowledge or literacy are equally important. In recent months, there has been debate over the validity of survey items about the Big Bang or Evolution as indicators of fact-based science knowledge. Additionally, while the NSF science scale is still in use by many researchers in the social sciences, many are using it as a monolithic single dimensional scale, rather than the multidimensional scale structure science knowledge was theorized as and the scale has been demonstrated to conform to in the past (Miller 1998, 2004). This structure has not been tested recently, and it is likely that the scale has more than two dimensions - particularly that fact-based knowledge may break into sub dimensions along topical interest areas - such as physical and life sciences. This paper performs a measurement analysis of the NSF science knowledge scales on seven samples and suggests a new model structure and the removal of items about evolution or the big bang, as they can be demonstrated to load on a religious beliefs dimension I term “Young Earth Worldview”.

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