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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8837 words || 
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1. Edgerly, Stephanie. "Red Media, Blue Media, and Purple Media: News Patterns in the Colorful Media Landscape" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p640638_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study builds from past research on news repertoires to explore the ways individuals combine exposure across a wide array of media and content. Results indicate that some news audiences have clear, ideologically driven news patterns. However, this is not characteristic of most, and some news audiences even pattern their exposure around both conservative and liberal news. A closer look at socio-demographic factors and participation levels among news patterns is also explored. Results shed light on the democratic implications of the high-choice media landscape, and research on news effects.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 5290 words || 
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2. Schneider, Christopher. "Media Trials: Media Justice or Just Media? Media Depictions of Martha Stewart and Kimberly Jones" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p101464_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Meaning is often constructed through dissemination of particular information communicated to the social body through the media. The ways in which messages concerning issues of justice are disseminated, formatted, and mediated, shape the very character of the way these messages are received and interpreted. Understanding then the organization, selection, and presentation of information disseminated by the media is necessary if we are to address general quires involving shared perceptions of social justice. This exploratory project represents an initial attempt at understanding some of the ways in which people might understand and negotiate social meanings of justice based from media presentations of celebrity trials. This paper adopts two analytical frameworks, Parker and Lauderdale’s (2003) conditions of political counterdenunciations and Altheide’s (2002) media logic in an effort to systematically analyze some of the logical contextual nuances concerning counterdenunciation acts utilized in the media in the recent Martha Stewart and Kimberly Jones (Lil’ Kim) trials. The findings presented here spotlight some of the ways in which the media act as a constituent to the overall process of counterdenunciation apart, but not necessarily removed from the context of the courtroom. Implications for future research are discussed.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8670 words || 
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3. Tsfati, Yariv. and Cohen, Jonathan. "Perceptions of Media and Media Effects: The Third-Person Effect, Trust in Media, and Hostile Media Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482441_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research about the way people perceive news media has made progress in three parallel avenues, the first used the concept of credibility and trust, the second of hostile media perceptions and the third—focusing on perceptions of media impact—used the concept of the third person perception. In this chapter, we argue that these three avenues are empirically and conceptually connected and that they are related to media effects in three ways: First, people's mistrust of media has been found to moderate the influence of media on the audience in an array of studies. Second, people's perceptions regarding media impact matter, albeit indirectly, because people react to these perceptions as if they were real. Third, the effects of perceptions of media influence are amplified when they are coupled with perceptions of media hostility, especially among audiences that are personally and emotionally involved in the issues on which media texts report.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Irwin, Matt. "How We Use Media Matters: The Relationship Between Media Automaticity, Media Multitasking, and Attention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 24, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1232593_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media psychologists have argued that the ubiquity of media technologies makes unique demands on human cognitive systems and may fundamentally change certain processes over time, including attention. Attention research to date has particularly focused on screen media use and media multitasking, though evidence of effects is mixed and sometimes contradictory. The present research suggests several approaches to the study of media effects on attention that may help to clarify and strengthen research going forward. The first suggestion is theoretical: research should focus on how individuals use media (cognitive processes), rather than more narrowly focusing on amount of media used. Specifically, we emphasize media multitasking and a distinction between reflective and automatic media uses, which may have different attention outcomes. The second suggestion is methodological: attention performance should be assessed using behavioral task measures when possible and such data should be analyzed with respect for data distributions. Two studies are proposed.

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