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2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 37 words || 
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1. Cho, Young. "State Mediation v. IO Mediation: When Do States Dump Mediation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2018-06-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p139745_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the question "Why do states mediate some interstate conflicts and international organizations others?" By investigating this question, the paper attempts to clarify the context in which each of the two actors offer to mediate.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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2. Cho, Young-Im. "State Mediation v. IO Mediation: When do States Dump Mediation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-06-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151694_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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3. Cho, Young-Im. "State Mediation v. IO Mediation: When do states dump mediation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-06-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151729_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 150 words || 
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4. Aiello, Giorgia. "A visual-material approach to the city: the urban built environment as a key form/force of mediation and mediatization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2018-06-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1103415_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: As a growing number of cities compete for global attention, the visual-material spectacle of the city is more than ever a significant medium of communication in its own right. This paper draws from research on post-Eastern Bloc cities, European Capitals of Culture, and urban regeneration both in Europe and the US. I argue that the urban built environment is a key form/force of mediation and mediatization. On one hand, it communicates specific discourses that shape subjectivities and constrain communities’ lives (the urban built environment mediates the performances of our everyday life). On the other hand, it is mobilized as symbolic currency for the publics of global marketplaces such as tourism, public communication, real estate, and commerce (the urban built environment performs for mediatized communication). Ultimately, this approach to the urban may contribute to developing and linking key concepts of media theory such as mediation and mediatization in novel, holistic ways.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 66 pages || Words: 16776 words || 
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5. Beardsley, Kyle. "Not All Mediators Are Created Equal: Choosing Who Mediates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-06-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40735_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The choice of who mediates in international crises and conflicts
is developed as a function of both demand -- the willingness of
the conflict actors to accept a third-party's participation -- and
supply -- the desire of the third parties to mediate. The demand
for mediator types involves a tradeoff between efficacy and costs.
Third parties that are endowed with resources that make them both
highly effective and costly will only be demanded when the
bargaining situations are sufficiently difficult. Devious
objectives may also lead actors to prefer stronger, but costlier,
mediators that are able to implement a cease fire and give the
actors time to regroup until they decide to resume hostilities
from a stronger position. On the supply side, the third parties
with the most persuasive potential -- \ie great power states and
IGO's -- will occasionally succeed in pressuring the actors to
accept them as mediators when the private benefits or the
valuation of the public benefits of mediation are high. Empirical
analysis using multiple model specifications and multiple data
sets confirm many of the proposed hypotheses. How who mediates
affects the likely outcome of mediation is discussed.

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