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2016 - Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting Words: 140 words || 
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1. Johnson, Austin. "Reframing Medical Discourse and Resisting Medical Authority: A Social Structure and Personality Approach to the Medicalization of Transgender Experience" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 97th Annual Meeting, Paris and Bally’s Hotels, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 23, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1111303_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: McLeod and Lively (2003) define the social structure and personality approach as a lens that focuses our attention on “the hierarchically organized processes through which macrostructures come to have relevance for the inner lives of individual persons and, in theory, the processes through which individual persons come to alter social systems” (2003:77). Using the social structure and personality approach, we are better able to track the ways that medical discourse influences transgender people via transgender community organizations. However, medical authority is not as simple as a top-down structural barrier. It is in constant negotiation. This paper uses ethnographic data to explore how transgender people in a community organization in the US southeast invoked a medical model and bent to medical authority on a context-specific basis and how they use collective definitions of identity to push back against medical authority.

2013 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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2. Tanaka, Akashi., Sekiya, Sho., Moriwaki, Kosuke. and Hirono, Yoshiyuki. "Historical Analysis of Advisory Committees on Medical Policies in Japan: Expert Knowledge and Medical Officers." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, Oct 09, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p667908_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study aims to analyze the roles of advisory committees (ACs) in the formation process of Japanese medical policies empirically and historically since few researches of the science advice have been conducted in an empirical way in Japan. According to our quantitative analysis, it turns out that the Ministry of Health has set and exploited a lot of ACs when compared with others.Such a feature could be explained by analyzing the following three factors: (1) organizational structure of the Ministry of Health, (2) adoption system of medical officers, and (3) relation between the Ministry of Health and medical research institutes. Through the above analysis, we try to highlight the issues of present science ACs system on medical policy in Japan, especially focusing on ACs’ roles for integration of expert knowledge into policies, collaboration between experts and citizens (such as self-help patient groups) and harmonization between administrative regulation and academic self-regulation.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3851 words || 
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3. Harris, Catherine. and Peeples, Ralph. "Medical Errors, Medical Malpractice and Death Cases in North Carolina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724782_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A study of hospitals in North Carolina from January 2002 to December 2007, reports that there was no statistically significant decrease in medical errors during this period, in spite of efforts to reduce them (Landrigen et al 2010). The present study utilizes a medical liability insurer’s archive of death cases in North Carolina from 2002 to 2009 (156 cases involving 401 physician- defendants). Given the implications of medical errors for health care delivery we consider whether demographic variables (age, gender, marital status and race) and system variables (hospital involvement and number of physician defendants) are predictive of higher risks of death. Our dependent variables are three major categories of error associated with patient death in the archive (diagnostic, treatment and surgical). We find that men are significantly more at risk for diagnostic errors than women. There is some evidence that age is predictive of treatment errors. Policy implications are discussed.

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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4. Mickleborough, Tim. "Medical Profession…. meet Cannabis sativa: a Foucauldian analysis of the legitimization of medical marijuana." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p990589_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In April 2014, Health Canada implemented its new Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR), a regulation that shifts the responsibility of access to medical marijuana from Health Canada to the prescribing physician. This move has made the medical profession uneasy as they are in a position of prescribing a substance that they know very little about. In this complex landscape, where discourses of evidence-based medicine and patient advocacy entangle with one another, questions arise of how the State can legitimize or professionalize a controversial substance such as marijuana for medicinal use. In order to disentangle this problematic, the analysis will turn to Michel Foucault, whose theories of how power operates in institutions to produce knowledge, a system of self-monitoring and new behaviours will be explored through a critical discourse analysis of newspaper articles, position papers, websites and government regulations. Preliminary findings of this analysis will be presented.

2015 - 4S Annual Meeting – Denver Words: 250 words || 
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5. Peddie, David. "Doing ‘Medications’: Praxiography to inform the coordination of medical work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting – Denver, Sheraton Downtown, Denver, CO, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1035587_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Abstract: Methods: This paper is informed by experiences in the participatory design of a software intervention aimed at reducing adverse drug events by improving informational continuity of care. Methods included work practice ethnography complemented by workshops with specific professional groups. Our team has developed praxiographic accounts of how medications are “done” in various hospitals, pharmacies, clinics, care homes, and research settings in British Columbia, Canada.

Main Arguments: Our project situates us as participants in the design and introduction of a form of coordination, or “boundary object” (Star & Griesemer, 1989) that may shift how distributed variants of medications “hang together” (Mol, 2003). So when deciding how we – as STS researchers – might intervene, we argue that we must attend to 1. the heterogeneity of medical work, and 2. the ways in which this heterogeneity is sustained (the actors enlisted, the ‘work’ that is done), and let these insights bring to light alternative configurations of “medications” within medical practice.

Contributions to STS: We build on Anne-Marie Mol’s (2003) insights into how we might understand objects as “things manipulated in practice” instead of as concrete referents for “perspectives” and “representations”. We follow her work and other post-ANT conceptions of the real to develop an ethnography of “medications” – today’s dominant therapeutic technology and one that is frequently treated as either a “physiological” or a “social” entity. In this study, we try to break from this conception by examining various sites of “knowing” and “doing” medications for professionals in the healthcare environment.

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