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2013 - 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 161 words || 
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1. Banks, Tiara. "Folk Medicine Use Among the Gullah: Bridging the Gap between Folk Medicine and Westernized Medicine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646705_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: This study examines the practice of folk medicine among a group of African Americans living on the coast of the Sea Islands, the Gullah/Geechee. The Gullah/Geechee are descendants of enslaved Africans, transported from Western Africa, who have been able to maintain their African influenced culture consisting of language, foodways, rituals, and folk beliefs. Although the Gullah/Geechee still carry on many of these traditions, there is a limited amount of accessible information on the prevalence of folk medicine use by the Gullah/Geechee in the 21st century. Twenty members of the Gullah/Geechee community, including three health care providers, will participate in this study consisting of semi-structured interviews relating to the use of folk medicine. With the rising health disparities and issues affecting the African American population, it is important that healthcare providers begin to establish links between different approaches to health. This may give insight into the Gullah/Geechee folk medicine practices in an effort to build cultural competency in the health care field.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7881 words || 
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2. Wang, Qian. "Doctor-Patient Communication in China: Cultural and Social Change in the Transition from Traditional Medicine to Western Medicine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368237_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper explores the doctor patient relationship and doctor-patient communication in current China from a cultural and social change perspective. over 30 interviews were conducted in five different cities in China on doctor patient communication, and themes were found out on cultural, social, family and other social context.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 138 words || 
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3. Ragland, Evan. "Experiment, Medicine, and Life in Late-Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth-Century Aristotelian Medicine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p480705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper investigates the responses to the increased experimentation on once-living bodies and living things that emerged in the late-sixteenth and early-seventeenth centuries. Paying special attention to the medical literature of notable Aristotelian physicians, this paper argues that there were distinct and influential ways of endorsing and accommodating experimentation within Aristotelian frameworks. There were also Aristotelians who rejected experimentation as "violent" and "against reason," yet even some of these physicians later used experimentation to argue against new doctrines emerging from the self-identified experimentalists. Key loci from Hippocrates, Aristotle's work on animals and meteorology, and the Posterior Analytics contributed to the conceptual debate. The context of medical practice and interactions with drugs provided important impetus and resources for changing discourses of experimentation, particularly as the proper sensible qualities became things to be explained, rather than the mainstays of explanation.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12919 words || 
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4. Curreli, Misty. "Do Alternative Medicine Patients Differ from Conventional Medicine Patients?: Survey-Questionnaire Results on Chronic Pain Sufferers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p648639_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While much research has been conducted on the experiences of people living with chronic pain, the literature on chronic pain and treatment-seeking rarely mentions the use of complementary and alternative medicine. In this comparative study on the use of acupuncture and pain management, I ask, how do health-seeking trajectories differ for patients who utilize non-conventional medicine? Further, is gender a predictive factor in who chooses alternative medicine? From December 2011 to August 2012, I distributed survey-questionnaires to 98 chronic pain patients in the waiting areas of one of two treatment locations (acupuncture and pain management offices). I collected data on the subjects’ basic time line of health-seeking behavior (from symptoms to diagnosis to treatments) as well as levels of trust for healthcare providers, patient proactivity, medication use and ratings of patient-centered care. The findings suggest that acupuncture patients, when compared with pain management patients, experienced more variation in their care-seeking histories when measuring the number of care providers they had seen for chronic pain and they were more likely to rate themselves as proactive in regard to their health. In addition, acupuncture patients used fewer medications than pain management patients, and were also more likely to rate their care as patient-oriented. Contrary to what the literature suggests, the alternative medicine patients were just as likely as the conventional medicine patients to trust healthcare providers as sources of reliable information. And further, gender was not a significant factor in predicting choice of treatment for chronic pain.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 221 words || 
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5. Fang, Xiaoping. "Narrating Rural Doctors and Chinese Medicine: Tensions and Dilemmas of Medicine and Health in Rural China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1102834_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper analyzes the shifting images of rural doctors and Chinese medicine in narratives of literature and film from 1949 to the present in order to explore the tensions and dilemmas of rural medicine and health issues in China. Popular anxiety about health services and the government’s concern to be seen as meeting the medical needs of China’s most vulnerable citizens, its rural dwellers, has produced a continuous body of literary and film works discussing these issues. In examining the key works from over six decades, the article argues that despite the huge political investment on the part of the Chinese Communist Party government in promoting the virtues of Chinese medicine and barefoot doctors, film and literature narratives reveal this rustic nationalistic vision was not an unproblematic ideological message. I show that two main tensions persisted during the entire period under examination. First, the tension between the efficacy of western and Chinese medicine and second, the tension between formally trained medical practitioners and para-professional practitioners, like bare-foot doctors. Each carried shifting ideological valences during the decades explored and these shifts complicated their portrayal in the creative works discussed. Within these two sections, the article moves chronologically from the early years of the CCP’s new rural health strategies to the twenty-first century—decades where health policy and arts policy both underwent dramatic transformations.

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