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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 83 words || 
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1. Stephens, Keri. and Deering Davis, Jenn. "Meeting Multitasking with ICTs: Effects on Communication Overload, Participation, and Meeting Satisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p426078_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Organizational meetings are becoming populated with electronic communication devices. This study examines key outcomes associated with using these devices to multitask during meetings. The findings suggest that increased communicative multitasking leads to higher levels of meeting satisfaction, and increased perceptions of overload. These devices also enable people to be accessible during meetings, which positively influences both major outcome variables. Levels of meeting participation are not influenced by communicative multitasking. Implications for communication technology and organizational scholars are also discussed.

2009 - International Communication Association Words: 150 words || 
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2. Shanock, Linda. and Baran, Ben. "When Supervisors Lead Meetings: Relationships With Leader-Member Exchange, Perceived Organizational Support, and Meeting Citizenship Behaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300747_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Drawing from the social exchange approaches of leader-member exchange (LMX) and organizational support theory, we investigated whether supervisors’ actions in work meetings they lead relate to subordinates’ perceptions of their supervisor, the organization, and behavior during such meetings. Using data from 291 working adults in a wide variety of occupations, structural equation modeling showed that employees’ perceptions of informational justice, meeting effectiveness, and meeting practices in supervisor-run meetings related significantly to perceived quality of their relationship with their supervisors (LMX), the organization (perceived organizational support), and meeting citizenship behaviors. Results indicate LMX served a mediating role in the relationships between supervisor actions during meetings and both perceived organizational support and meeting citizenship behaviors. The main implication of the study is that during meetings they run, supervisors have the potential to influence not only subordinates’ perceptions of the supervisor and subordinate behavior during meetings, but also subordinates’ view of the organization.

2004 - American Sociological Association Words: 91 words || 
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3. Pescosolido, Bernice. "Can Images & Effects Meet? Sociology Meets Cognitive Psychology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111240_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Part of the dilemma in addressing mental illness in the media surrounds the diverse and scattered disciplinary efforts. In this presentation, we present a first effort to bring together theory and methods from sociology (prejudice, social network contacts, and survey research) and cognitive psychology/communications research (retention; physiological, cognitive and emotional effects, and experiments). We target the underlying roots of stigma and propose an integrated approach to guide future studies which combines a content analysis of television, with an analysis of effects on individuals and efforts directed to individual change.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 4861 words || 
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4. Gomez, Luis. and Ballard, Dawna. "Meeting Time: Negotiating Organizational Temporality Through Meetings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113430_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we argue that group meetings are an overlooked structure in the current conversations regarding group and organizational temporality. Meetings are both instrumental and expressive social forms (Schwartzman, 1986) that are inherently temporal and communicative. Prior research on time has used meetings as the unit of analysis to study group interactions, but none has considered the unique position of meetings as a socio-temporal form and communication structure. Following the theoretical framework proposed by Ballard and Seibold (2003), we suggest that meetings both shape and are shaped by organizational members’ shared experience of time.

2009 - International Communication Association Words: 117 words || 
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5. Scott, Clifton., Rogelberg, Steven. and Allen, Joseph. "The Meeting as a Contemporary Organizational Research Topic: Why Meetings Matter and Always Should Have" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300639_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: With few exceptions, organizational scholars have only recently begun to conceptualize meetings as constitutive features of organizational life. Prescriptive advice about meeting facilitation is widespread, but scholarly work that considers meetings as process and product of organizational phenomena is rare. When meetings have received empirical attention, they have often been explored indirectly as a setting for the collection of data on some other topic (e.g., concertive control studies) and/or as an experimental task (e.g., studies of group role development). This paper synthesizes research from a variety of disciplinary and theoretical domains to develop a rationale for why meetings are a worthy organizational research topic in and of themselves. It concludes by presenting an agenda for future research.

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