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2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 267 words || 
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1. Berardi, Luciano. "Natural mentoring in an academic setting: Predictors of mentoring and the role of mentoring in students’ adjustment to college" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the roles of parental attachment and help-seeking strategies in the number of mentoring relationships reported by college students and the role of mentoring in students’ adjustment to the college environment. Moos’ (2002) theory is used as a framework for this study because it proposes that individual characteristics and the environment to which a person transitions affect one another and influence individual functioning and psychosocial outcomes. Participants for this investigation are 452 first-year students who completed an online survey. Participants’ ages are between 17 and 23 years old (M = 18.6; SD = 0.6). Participants are 71% female (n=322), 41% (n=184) is ethnic minority, and 36% (n=165) is first-generation college students. The first hypothesis is that higher levels of parental attachment will significantly predict the number of natural mentoring relationships. Second, it is expected that higher levels of parental attachment will significantly predict more help-seeking behaviors. Third, it is expected that help-seeking strategies will mediate the association between attachment to parents and the number of mentors. Finally, is expected that more informal mentoring relationships on campus will predict a more healthy social, emotional and academic adjustment to college. Further, among students who have mentoring relationships, the role of the quality of these relationships in students’ adjustment will be examined. The quality of relationships will be examined via 1) the frequency of contact between mentors and mentees; 2) the duration of the relationship, and 3) the social support provided by mentors. Structural equation modeling will be used to test study hypotheses. Implications for interventions and future research directions will be discussed.

2014 - Advancing Teacher Education that Matters in Teaching, Learning, and Schooling. Pages: unavailable || Words: 721 words || 
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2. Bernhardt, Philip. and Putney, LeAnn. "Mentoring the Mentors: Supporting Cooperating Teachers through Professional Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Advancing Teacher Education that Matters in Teaching, Learning, and Schooling., Hyatt Regency St. Louis Riverfront, St. Louis, MO, Feb 14, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675404_index.html>
Publication Type: Emerging Scholars Series
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research presentation will examine findings from an evaluative study of a university-based professional development program supporting educators committed to mentoring and supervising pre-service teachers.

2013 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1668 words || 
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3. Shakeshaft, Charol. and Moss, Wendi. "Mentoring Teachers in an Urban Environment: Black Mentors and White Mentees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p673717_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a qualitative interview study of the relationships between black mentor teachers and their white first year teacher mentees in an urban school system. The themes explored in this paper are the racial issues, as perceived by white teachers, of classroom management; mentor belief that no race issues exist; race perceptions of white teachers prior to their first year; and the lack of conversation about race.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10239 words || 
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4. Shakeshaft, Charol. and Moss, Wendi. "Mentoring Teachers in an Urban School District: Black Mentors and White Mentees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725559_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Mentoring Teachers in an Urban School District: Black Mentors and White Mentees

This paper presents the results of a qualitative interview study of six pairs of mentor-mentee teachers in an urban school. In every case, the veteran mentor is a black woman and the mentee is a white woman. All teachers are employed in an urban school system that is 80% black students with a majority of teachers and a majority of administrators who identify as black. At the time of the study, the superintendent of the district was also a black woman. The study sought to understand issues of race consciousness in mentor pairs and the ways that it interacted with the mentoring relationship. Race was recognized as a powerful director of action and effectiveness by the white teachers who believed that their race was an impediment to success. These women resistant the counsel of their black mentors, noting that the suggested approaches to classroom management and student interaction would not work for a white teacher. The black mentors did not experience any issues of race within their schools, nor did they agree with the white teachers that classroom management strategies were related to race of teacher and race of student. None of the mentor-mentee pairs discussed race with each other. White teachers believed it was a sensitive issue and did not feel comfortable raising any issues related to race and black mentors believed there were no issues related to race.

2016 - ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. McCallum, Carmen., Libarkin, Julie. and James, Patricia. "Types of Mentoring and Their Relationship to Sense of Belonging, Mentor Trust, and Career Satisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good, Hyatt Regency Columbus, Columbus, Ohio, Nov 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1159076_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the types of mentoring underrepresented students in a STEM field contribute to their career satisfaction. Utilizing social capital as a framework, the role of Sense of Belonging and Trust are explored.

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