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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14110 words || 
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1. Shor, Eran., Kalish, Rachel. and Yogev, Tamar. "The Rising Risk of Mortality among Singles: Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410063_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Never-married persons constitute a growing demographic group, yet meta-analysis and meta-regression have not been used to determine the magnitude of the all-cause mortality risk among non-elderly singles and important moderating factors have not been explored. We extracted 641 mortality risk estimates from 95 publications, providing data on more than 500 million persons. The mean hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.37) among multivariate-adjusted HRs. The mean HR was higher for men (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.41) than for women (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.14-1.32). Meta-regressions show that HRs have been increasing over time, are higher for younger cohorts, and are growing most significantly among women.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 167 words || 
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2. Schmucker, Martin. and Lösel, Friedrich. "Meta-analyzing Sexual Offender Treatment Efficacy: An Integration of Research Syntheses and the Effects of Meta-analytic Strategies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201963_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: There are a number of quantitative integrations on the effectiveness of sexual offender treatment. Firstly, this paper summarizes the findings of existing research integrations and gives an overview of the consistencies and inconsistencies in the different analyses. Although most of the reviews concluded that treatment on average is successful, the size of the effects differs considerably. In addition, moderator analyses do converge on certain variables, but differ in their conclusions for others. Secondly, this paper deals with the basic differences between integrations and relate them to the outcomes of individual research summaries (e.g., types of studies considered, method of quantitative integration, and the kind of moderator variables used for detailed analyses). The effects of differing meta-analytical decisions and strategies are demonstrated using a study pool that intended to merge and update those of existing integrations (Lösel & Schmucker, 2005). Furthermore, based on this study pool, a more detailed moderator analysis is presented to illustrate the importance of and the obstacles in the detailed appraisal of moderating factors.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Meier, Adrian. and Reinecke, Leonard. "The Relationship Between Computer-Mediated Communication and Mental Health—a Meta-Review of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1367342_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on whether and how everyday forms of CMC (e.g., social media use) affect users’ mental health has exponentially increased in recent years, accompanied by a controversial public debate. In reaction to this, a large number of syntheses (i.e., meta-analyses and systematic reviews) has accumulated. As these syntheses present widely different conclusions about the effects of various forms of CMC on various mental health indicators, there is need for a new approach that can integrate disparate research results from a disconnected literature. We address this issue with a meta-review of twenty syntheses articles. Results underline that conclusions about the effects of CMC on mental health are mixed and often premature, due to severe conceptual and methodological limitations of the synthesized primary studies. By constructing a theoretical model of mental health and a taxonomy of CMC variables, we offer a framework that can guide future communication research in this interdisciplinary field.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 46 pages || Words: 14295 words || 
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4. Roelfs, David. and Curreli, Misty. "Widowhood and Mortality: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/DOWNLOAD>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410050_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study of spousal bereavement and mortality has long been a major topic of interest for social scientists, but a recent meta-analysis focused exclusively on elderly cohorts. Important moderating factors such as age, the duration of follow-up, and regional differences have not been adequately explored with this approach. Keyword searches were conducted in multiple electronic databases, supplemented by extensive iterative hand searches, and extracted 1351 mortality risk estimates from 123 publications, providing data on more than 500 million persons. The mean hazard ratio (HR) for mortality in this meta-analysis was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.25) among HRs adjusted for age and additional covariates. The mean effect was higher for men (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.19-1.35) than for women (HR, 1.15; 95% CI: 1.09-1.22). A significant interaction effect was found between gender and mean age of the sample, with HRs decreasing more rapidly for men than for women as age increased. Other significant predictors of HR magnitude included sample size, year of publication, geographic region, level of statistical adjustment, and study quality.

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