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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 46 pages || Words: 14295 words || 
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1. Roelfs, David. and Curreli, Misty. "Widowhood and Mortality: A Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/DOWNLOAD>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410050_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study of spousal bereavement and mortality has long been a major topic of interest for social scientists, but a recent meta-analysis focused exclusively on elderly cohorts. Important moderating factors such as age, the duration of follow-up, and regional differences have not been adequately explored with this approach. Keyword searches were conducted in multiple electronic databases, supplemented by extensive iterative hand searches, and extracted 1351 mortality risk estimates from 123 publications, providing data on more than 500 million persons. The mean hazard ratio (HR) for mortality in this meta-analysis was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.25) among HRs adjusted for age and additional covariates. The mean effect was higher for men (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.19-1.35) than for women (HR, 1.15; 95% CI: 1.09-1.22). A significant interaction effect was found between gender and mean age of the sample, with HRs decreasing more rapidly for men than for women as age increased. Other significant predictors of HR magnitude included sample size, year of publication, geographic region, level of statistical adjustment, and study quality.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14110 words || 
Info
2. Shor, Eran., Kalish, Rachel. and Yogev, Tamar. "The Rising Risk of Mortality among Singles: Meta-Analysis and Meta-Regression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410063_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Never-married persons constitute a growing demographic group, yet meta-analysis and meta-regression have not been used to determine the magnitude of the all-cause mortality risk among non-elderly singles and important moderating factors have not been explored. We extracted 641 mortality risk estimates from 95 publications, providing data on more than 500 million persons. The mean hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.37) among multivariate-adjusted HRs. The mean HR was higher for men (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.41) than for women (HR, 1.23; 95% CI: 1.14-1.32). Meta-regressions show that HRs have been increasing over time, are higher for younger cohorts, and are growing most significantly among women.

2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 76 words || 
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3. Leary, Heather. and Walker, Andrew. "Meta-Analysis and Meta-Synthesis Methodologies: Rigorously Piecing Together and Analyzing Research Knowledge" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1263933_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Meta-analysis and meta-synthesis are research methodologies that provide a trustworthy synthesis of scientific studies. Moving away from a narrative review they provide a structure for examining both quantitative (meta-analysis) and qualitative (meta-synthesis) research studies. This session will introduce both methods and touch on emerging techniques such as Baeysian Network Meta-Analysis and single case meta-analyses with emphasis on the value and need of using both methods in educational technology research. Sample results will be provided and discussed.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 103 words || 
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4. Distler, Michael. "Less Debate, More Analysis: A Meta-Analysis of Literature on Broken Windows Policing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517234_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In their broken windows thesis, Wilson and Kelling (1982) propose that social and physical disorder leads to a breakdown in informal social controls, thereby allowing for more serious crime to occur. This thesis had a tangible impact on policy, though research has shown mixed results with regard to its effectiveness. Due to the unclear findings in the empirical research, a meta-analysis of 66 effect sizes nested within eleven studies was conducted to better understand the relationship between order maintenance policing and crime. Results show that BW policing does have an effect on crime, though methodological variation across studies tends to condition this effect.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 343 words || 
Info
5. Todd, Brenda., Di Costa, Steven., Green, Amanda. and Barry, John. "Boys and girls preference for different types of toy: A systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957680_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The biological and environmental origins of sex-typed behaviour are investigated in studies of children’s play with gender-typed toys. We report a systematic review of typical children’s toy preferences in 25 groups of children from 14 studies based in various Western countries. Participants were 585 boys and 632 girls, aged between one and eight years. Boys and girls played with ‘gender-typical’ toys significantly longer than ‘gender-atypical’ toys. Meta-regression showed no significant effect of child’s age, publication date, geographical location of the study or of adult presence, but gender differences were greater in the home rather than child care contexts. These findings suggest a role for both nature and nurture in gender-typed toy preference and have implications for education and child care.
Studies that compared toy choice in healthy boys and girls were eligible for inclusion. Databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, Maternity and Infant Care, and PsycINFO) were searched up to October 2013.
From 1607 references, 14 studies of 25 groups of children (585 boys and 632 girls) met the inclusion criteria. The studies were carried out in various Western countries between the years 1980 and 2014, with children in age groups from on average 13 months old to on average 93 months old. Using the Inverse variance method, it was found that boys chose ‘boy toys’ significantly more than girls (SMD=0.91; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.03) and girls chose ‘girl toys’ significantly more than boys (SMD=-0.73; 95% CI -0.85 to -0.62). Meta-regression found that the gender difference in play was greater when a study took place in the home rather than at a nursery (p<.05). There was no significant effect on toy preference of the child’s age, presence of an adult, the year the study was conducted, nor the country the study was conducted in.
Althought the context in which the study took place was a predictor of the size of the sex difference in gendered toy preference, the gender differences still remained after taking this into account. These findings suggest a role for both nature and nurture in gendered toy preference.

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