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Showing 1 through 5 of 3,481 records.
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2005 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 4897 words || 
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1. Mironesco, Monique. "Feminist Methods by Any Other Name: Including Feminist Methods in Crafting a Qualitative Methods Core Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Oakland, California, Mar 17, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p87670_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I examine the experience of trying to insert feminist methods into a qualitative methods course as well as attempting to make that same qualitative methods course a requirement for all Social Science students at the University of Hawai`i, West O`ahu. Faculty attitudes and student resistance are also discussed.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 146 words || 
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2. White, Leah. "Competitive Methods of Explaining Rhetorical Methods: Accuracy vs. Distortion in the Description of Scholarly Research Methods in the Crucible of Competitive Forensics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p255146_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: When compared to the communication analysis speeches of the past, the CA’s of today seem to be spending more time on explaining their methods and drawing their conclusions while spending less and less time actually applying a methodological tool to a rhetorical artifact. This paper will consider this trend in relation to such topics as: (1) the historical evolution of Communication Analysis speeches, (2) the reasons for the reallocation of time/priorities, (3) the impact of this trend on student understanding of the process of conducting rhetorical criticism (and the concurrent ability to conduct meaningful analytic dissection), (4) the difficulty of drawing meaningful conclusions and implications at the end of the speech (and the difficulty of connecting these insights to the application step of the process), and (5) the implications of this trend for students who intend to pursue graduate work in rhetorical criticism.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 123 words || 
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3. Smith, Cindy. "Are International Comparative Methods Different than Traditional Methods or Are They Just Good Methods?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201848_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper makes the argument that international, cross national or transnational comparative methods are simply good methods. It further discusses that isolating the multi-country aspect of these methods will further marginalize the methods and relegate it to discussion among a small percentage of researchers. Examples are provided for why we should discuss these methods as mainstream good methods. First, this paper will briefly discuss the development of the literature, clarifying comparative design from comparative methods. Then, it will discuss some of the characteristics of comparative methods that have been touted as unique, such as language and culture. Finally, it makes the case for why they are not – or should not be – isolated as international methods.

2009 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: 4 pages || Words: 1494 words || 
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4. Hitchcock, John. "Single-Case Designs and Qualitative Methods: Applying a Mixed Methods Research Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Sheraton Westport Chalet Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Oct 14, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p379819_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Single-case designs (SCDs) are essentially a form of interrupted time-series designs developed to yield rigorous evidence of intervention effects (Kratochwill, 1978; Kratochwill & Levin, 1992). These approaches use an individual case (sometimes called a subject) to serve as its own counterfactual and performance is repeatedly measured across phases where a treatment is present and at times when it is not. A key feature of a rigorous SCD is the experimental manipulation of the introduction (and sometimes removal) of a treatment. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to explore methods whereby a mixed methods framework can be applied in the context of SCDs. That is, what qualitative methods might be applied to enhance SCD work so as to improve on a rigorous design? And, indeed, is there a case for mixing the traditions?

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9301 words || 
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5. Cripe, Emily. "Connecting Research Methods: Breastfeeding Support Explored Through Mixed Methods" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713806_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An exploratory mixed methods design is used to understand women's experiences with social support and infant feeding methods. Ethnographic methods were used to study two breastfeeding support groups. This was followed by a survey of women about their social support resources and experiences feeding their infants. The researcher returned to the qualitative data to enrich understandings of these findings. This illustrates the power of using mixed methods in research when qualitative research is privileged.

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