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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 5150 words || 
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1. Chew, Martha. "Deconstruction of Mexican Cultural Identity and everyday practices: some tensions between the changing "Mexicanness" and fixed models of Mexican identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112690_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to revise and analyze the profile prevalent in the academia that explains the cultural values and behaviors of Mexicans. The main assumption of this paper is that the complexities of the changing world and power differences have not been incorporated sufficiently into the study of cultural interactions. Most studies on Mexican culture tend to be based on fixed profiles of national cultures.
In this paper I propose a simple idea about a very complex topic: the nature of the Mexican culture related to work and the transformations that have been occurring during the last twenty years. The first part provides the theoretical framework on which this study is based. The second part provides a brief introduction to the predominant narratives in the academic discourse regarding the values and behaviors of Mexicans. Thereafter, there is an analysis of some changes that have taken place in Mexican society. The last part provides some elements that can be incorporated to understand better the complexities of Mexican cultural identity and everyday practices.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 11947 words || 
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2. Romo, Harriett. "Transnational Lives in San Antonio: A Study of Mexican and Mexican American Transnational Experiences in a Mexican Majority U.S. City" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107119_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the transnational context of the city of San Antonio, a U.S. city with a majority Mexican origin population. It draws on case studies developed from extended interviews with Mexican immigrants, second- generation, and Mexican American residents of the city.

2013 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 175 words || 
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3. Lopez, Jennifer. "Relations amongst Mexican Immigrants and Indigenous Mexican Immigrants Perpetuate Mexican Social Hierarchy in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Nugget Casino, Reno/Sparks, Nevada, Mar 21, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633984_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What are the relationships between Mixtec immigrants with other Mexican immigrants, other ethnic immigrants, and U.S. Americans? Does the social stratification of Mexican society transcend boarders and reinstates itself into U.S. society? How do Mixtecs adopt or reject the “pan-ethnic” identity? In this paper, I argue that Mixtec immigrants occupy a similar social rung in the U.S. as a result of social hierarchies perpetuated transnationally by other Mexicans. The population for this study is first generation parents who emigrated from the state of Oaxaca and who continue to identify with their Mixtecan roots. I will explore their motives for immigrating, the role their indigenous ancestry has played in both the immigrating process and living in the United States, and how it has shaped their relationship with other Mexican immigrants. I will collect data through in-depth interviews with Mixtec immigrants/citizens living in eastern Washington State. I also intend to explore the impacts of the “pan-ethnic” label and how it has limited the scope of Latino variety present within American society, demonstrating how social hierarchies are transnational.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10425 words || 
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4. Hunter, Lori. and Nawrotzki, Raphael. "Do Rainfall Deficits “Push” Rural Mexican Migrants? Evidence from the Mexican Census" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505764_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public and political realms have been paying increasing attention to the potential for environmental change to alter patterns of human migration. Unfortunately, scholars haven’t kept up, with a dearth of empirical, peer-reviewed scholarship on the topic. This article contributes important empirical evidence by examining the association between human migration patterns and environmental change,
operationalized as recent shifts in precipitation. We use an innovative combination of data by merging historical state-level rainfall information from the Mexican National Water Commission (CONAGUA), with a large data set (N=2,454,651) from the Mexico General Population and Housing Census (MGPHC) for the year 2000 (MPC 2010). A multilevel logistic regression model explores the association between state-level rainfall change and migration controlling for numerous socio-demographic and socioeconomic
factors. Importantly, we examine environmental characteristics at both origin and destination locations. Origin areas with relatively higher levels of precipitation experience significantly less outmigration, whereas a change in rainfall at the area of destination has no significant association. Further, the effect of socio-demographic factors on migration was found to be contingent on the level of
rainfall. In all, rainfall was found to have a direct as well as an indirect effect on migration whereas both effects are contingent on the climatic conditions of the area of residency prior to a move. As such, this research establishes an empirical basis for the significance of rainfall as an environmental factor shaping internal population mobility in rural Mexico. The work lays an important foundation for additional exploration of environmental "push" factors for U.S. emigration.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 458 words || 
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5. Lopez, Maria. "Nunca más sin nosotras: Mexican and Mexican-American Women in the U.S-Mexico Border Labor Force" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, Nov 21, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p653589_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study of Mexican migration into the United States since the Porfiriato has been typically male oriented. The migration of women has been to a certain extent, invisible. Since the Mexican Revolution, migration brought new and different experiences for not only men but also for women. In the same way that migration liberated the peon from the burden of the hacienda system, migration constituted a certain degree of liberation for women from the patriarchal system. Mexican Women that migrated to United States during the 1920s, and that continued to migrate up until our days, have been confronting a myriad of adverse situations, from the oppression of the patriarchal system in the family, to the aggressive exploitation of industrial capitalism of the United States.
The purpose of this essay is to analyze the uniqueness of Mexican and Mexican American women’s actions in several strikes in the city of El Paso, Texas. From the 1919 Laundry strikes up to the 1994 protests against NAFTA, these events reveal the ways in which women in the border expanded their leaderships corps and political awareness, as well as their a constant struggle against race, gender, and class discrimination. These historical events trace the continuity of the resistance of working class Mexican women against exploitation, but they also reveal the persistence economical and racist discrimination of the capitalist system towards Mexican women in the border.
A main objective in the study of these relatively unknown labor strikes in the city of El Paso, Texas is to trace the continuity of economic and racial exploitation of Mexican and Mexican American women in the labor force. This study addresses issues such as occupational mobility of women over a specific period of time and working class experiences and labor unionization in the U.S-Mexico Border. The particularity of this work resides in the study of resilience and endeavor of Mexican and Mexican American working women in confronting the antagonist and convoluting environment in the border.
The economic growth of El Paso is without a doubt is a result of the abundant Mexican and Mexican American labor force. Women played a major role in the development of the textile industry that has been a prominent force in El Paso throughout the 20th century. More than 100 years of its presence can not be left aside or undermine when considering its effects on the economy throughout the years at the local, national, and international levels. More over, within this scheme it is important to think about the workers (specifically the women) that contributed to the economy with their every day labor; their efforts and lives cannot go unnoticed. It was through their years of hard work, endurance and dedication that these factories prospered and that companies made their huge profits.

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