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2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Bennett, Natasha. "Europe’s Forgotten Migrants: Migrant Roma Incorporation in France and Spain" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Models of integration in the immigration incorporation literature are unable to fully capture the failures of migrant Roma incorporation across Europe. Differences in immigrant incorporation have been explained by nativist sentiments (Zolberg 2006), differences in welfare state models (Esping-Andersen 1990; Ireland 2004), variation in incorporation regimes (Soysal 1994) and integration policies (Entzinger 2000) and by the effect of socialization (Converse 1969, Portes and Rumbaud 2006; White et al 2008). Alone, these literatures do not leverage enough explanatory power in the case of migrant Roma entering Western Europe from mainly Romania and Bulgaria under the E.U. Free Movement Directive. Negative views towards the Roma are omnipresent, there is little variation across welfare state models, incorporation regimes, and market economies, and socialization explanations fall short as Roma children have little access to schooling.

This paper compares migrant Roma welfare across France and Spain-arguably the worst and best cases for Roma integration respectively. I argue that aside from citizenship norms, the level of political and fiscal decentralization is a key mechanism affecting Roma integration outcomes. When discriminatory policies are centralized- as they are in France- they reinforce exclusion nationally. When policies are generally friendly towards migrants but also decentralized-as they are in Spain- there is local level flexibility to expand upon national policy and there is a greater sense of local level responsibility and accountability for the population. This speaks to a need to evaluate migrant incorporation at different levels of governance as policies in decentralized states are not necessarily created and enacted centrally. Evidence is based on interviews with legal experts, human rights activists, and some Roma migrants, and content analysis of historical documents.

2017 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 418 words || 
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2. Itagaki, Lynn. "The Migrant is Dead, Long Live the Citizen!: Pro-Migrant Activism at US and EU Borders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 08, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1262826_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The late January 2017 Executive Order banning immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries suspended the entry of Syrian refugees indefinitely, a rejection of one of the most severe humanitarian crises and five million displaced peoples from Syria. Tens of thousands continue to protest at airports and public officials’ offices. What kind of pedagogies of dissent does the performance art of protest teach us? How do pro-migrant “artivism” around the circulation of (dead) West Asian migrant bodies in the the United States and the European Union? The Syrian refugee crisis exposes the fragility of civil and human rights discourses that bind the US and the EU, the former as the “nation of immigrants” and the latter as welcoming asylum seekers in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

This paper explores the significance of protest art against exclusion in the US and EU that incorporates human matter into the art itself. This paper considers such artivism as the mural painted entirely of human blood ineligible for donation by disqualified populations--HIV positive and men who have sex with men—by Los Angeles-based artist Illma Gore and the INDECLINE art collective that has been most famous for naked Trump statues in prominent public spaces to the exhumation in Italy of a drowned Syrian migrant woman, her transport to Germany, and her memorial service in front of the German parliament by the Berlin-based artivist organization, the Center for Political Beauty. Contesting notions of geography, form, and life in its 2015 multimedia performance project The Dead Are Coming!, the piece involved faked government press releases and announcements of new public works projects such as a bridge across the Mediterranean, inspiring impromptu “Graves of the Unknown Migrant” across continents. Given the extremely precarity of Syrian refugees, the Center’s featuring of a dead person enables the most profound critique of distinctions among mind, body and flesh that dehumanize and obscure these migrants. Inspired by Black diasporic theorists Hortense Spillers, Alexander Weheliye, and Sylvia Wynter, this paper questions long-standing certainties of ostensibly liberatory practices--the recuperation of migrants’ human rights and equal inclusion into the nation-state--through performance art circulating around decaying human flesh and blood. How does the refugee corpse trouble and expose the limitations of feminist materialism and posthumanism as well as intersectionality and assemblage as Jasbir Puar identifies in her 2012 article, “‘I would rather be a cyborg than a goddess’: Becoming-Intersectional in Assemblage Theory”? How does the (un)mourned death of Syrian refugees reveal the contiguities and intersections among Arab, Asian, and Muslim diasporas and identities converging around the world?

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 219 words || 
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3. Takamura, Kazue. "Advocates for Detained Migrants: The Role of Pro-Migrant Civic Groups in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1196387_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The goal of this paper is to study the role of civic groups that address and defend the rights of detained migrants. In recent years, the number of asylum seekers in Japan has increased sharply from 2,000 in 2010 to nearly 8,000 in 2015. Despite the recent surge of refugees, the Japanese state maintains an unsympathetic policy toward asylum seekers and other irregular forms of migrants. Immigration authorities detain asylum seekers upon arrival and reject the majority of asylum applications. This has engendered a set of human rights concerns including lack of legal representation, unjustified prolonged periods of detention, overcrowded facilities, restricted access to family members and public support, inadequate health care, suicide, and unexplained deaths in detention centers. Japan’s treatment of asylum seekers is increasingly seen as violating the 1951 UN Refugee Convention, which the country signed in 1981.
This paper will analyze the role of pro-migrant civic groups in addressing the living conditions and rights of foreign detainees and their impact on Japan’s immigration policy. It will detail the various groups working to improve the conditions of migrants, their strategies for policy reform, and their effects on the lives of migrants and on domestic policy. The paper is based heavily on interviews in Japan with NGOs and detained migrants, including those still being held in detention centers.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 266 words || 
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4. Soco-Roda, Andrea. "Return Migrants as ‘Migrant-contributors’? Reintegration Discourse and the Shaping of ‘Diasporic Subjects’" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1104118_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper provides a critique of reintegration discourses in the Philippines by examining how ‘diaspora strategies’ aimed at labor migrants are extended even when these migrants return. The emphasis of state diaspora strategies toward labor migrants has always been on financial remittances. These migrants are encouraged to consistently send remittances and are called heroes for doing so. Even in return, notions of their productivity still center around remittances, an expectation that has been institutionalized in the discourse of reintegration. On the surface, reintegration seems to be a policy that opens up doors to the return of labor migrants, facilitating their re-adaptation to households and communities. This paper however, shows reintegration to be a false concept because it not only disregards the skills that returnees already have but also supports a cash economy that pushes people to continuously work abroad. The idea of reintegration is first premised on an institutional bias - on how the state sees the migration of the lower classes and their return to rural areas, and what the state can obtain from these ‘diasporic subjects.’ The discourse of reintegration also furthers the notion of returnees as ‘migrant-contributors’ despite the fact that they are already in the ‘home.’ Returnees are thus molded toward state expectations of productivity, which means that they should not only possess financial gains, but that they should use these gains in ways deemed economically productive by the state. Such a cash-centric way of looking at development tends to ignore the meanings that migrants assign to the migratory process and their place-making experience in return, and could thus promote further out-migration.

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