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2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 3545 words || 
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1. Kilburn, John. "The Decline of the Mills and the Rise of Social Services in a Northeastern Mill Town" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper discusses the social changes that accompany the economic changes in the northeastern mill town of Willimantic, Connecticut. The primary focus of this study is the change in the public sentiment of the town as the economy makes its transition from the identity of mill town to one where higher education, health care and social services drive the culture. The general sentiments of the populace acknowledge the benefits of social programs, however, there is also a widespread belief that the town is harmed substantially by “enabling” and “importing” people with problems.
My overall argument is that towns facing economic transitions will go through substantial social changes. The new jobs will change the character of the town. As job growth in the social service sector grows and manufacturing declines, many people voice concern about the town’s image. The characterization of Willimantic as a “family-friendly” college town with beautiful Victorian homes clashes with the characterization of a town that is full of poor, drug addicted individuals with criminal records, who breaks the law or resides in halfway houses to get “clean and sober,” or avoid further criminal activity.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 11113 words || 
Info
2. Muirhead, Russell. "Two Cheers for Party Spirit: Mill's Salutary Antagonisms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p39746_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Amid the resurgence of party spirit in the U.S., partisanship retains its bad name. Often branded an expression of inherited prejudice, narrow interest, or dogmatic commitment, it seems at odds with good citizenship. In what form, if any, is partisanship something admirable? This paper canvasses four central reasons supporting an anti-partisan disposition and against these, sketches a defense of party spirit.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 12200 words || 
Info
3. Hirschmann, Nancy. "Mill, Carework, and Productive Labor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p39945_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many feminist writings on Mill have noted Mill’s ambivalence, if not outright contradiction, between his support for women’s right to work in the economy and his assertions that women will most likely, and perhaps should, devote themselves to their families. I examine this tension from the perspective of Mill’s work on political economy, which most feminist readers tend to ignore. I argue that if Mill is to avoid self-contradiction, he must maintain that women’s household labor is productive, and contributes to political economy. Such an assertion is necessary to sustain his claims that women have rights to property as the foundation for his vision of gender equality. Within the context of his writings on gender, I examine Mill’s arguments on productive labor, evaluate whether he considers women’s labor to be productive, and discuss what follows from the fact that, for the most part, he does not.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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4. Chiu, Yvonne. "Perfectionism in J.S. Mill???s Economic Thought" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153005_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 12 pages || Words: 3309 words || 
Info
5. Heller, Jacob. "Mill, Marx, Race, and American Labor “Exceptionalism”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106737_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues three things. First, that race must be considered more closely and more seriously as a factor in American labor “exceptionalism.” Second, that it is possible to understand race and racism not simply as tools of capitalism or as the result of capitalist exploitation, but as independent variables for the course of American labor history; race in America is part of the culture and its national traditions. Third, and intertwined with these previous two, this paper argues for the usefulness of an analysis comparing the ideas of Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill on the function of race differences in working class formation. Mill’s view of the effects of race and race-like structures is not entirely different than Marx’s, but in approaching the problem without the burden of an inevitable socialist revolution, it allows for a more direct appreciation of the cultural substrate of racism and its role in American labor “exceptionalism.”

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