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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,625 records.
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2005 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 14729 words || 
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1. Espino, Rodolfo. "Minority Representation and Minority Empowerment: The Effects of Minority Representation on Political Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Oakland, California, Mar 17, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p87542_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars of race and representation recognize that studies of representation must also assess the impact of representation on constituents' behavior and attitudes. Such a focus sheds light on the extent to which minority Americans view the American political
system as legitimate and the extent to which they view their own role in the political system as meaningful. Literature on ``minority political empowerment'' initially held an exclusive focus on black empowerment at the local level. Recent studies have expanded this focus to other levels of political representation and
now also to Latinos in the United States. Yet, these studies will largely focus on only one group vis-a-vis one type of representative. This paper expands on earlier studies of minority empowerment and representation by comparing white, black, and Latino
attitudes and behavior toward different types of racial
representation in Congress by utilizing data from the same source. The data used in this paper comes from the ANES between 1992 and 2000. The general findings show that Latinos are positively responsive to Latino representation in Congress and both black and white Americans are not positively or negatively responsive to either black or Latino representation in Congress.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 33 words || 
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2. Ueda, Michiko. "Do Minorities Benefit from Having Minority Representatives? ? Minority Representation and its Impact on State Policy Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85284_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines whether increased minority representation in state legislatures in the last 30 years has changed policy outcomes. It shows that the presence of minority representatives had notable effects on policies.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 37 pages || Words: 8828 words || 
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3. Moser, Robert. and Goodnow, Regina. "Layers of ethnicity: The effects of ethnic federalism, minority-majority districts, and minority concentration on the electoral success of ethnic minorities in Russia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Studies on the US have shown that minority-majority districts increase the turnout of minority voters and the electoral success of minority candidates. However, few studies have explored how various forms of ethnic geography affect minority electoral politics. We address this issue by examining the effects of Russia’s multiple layers of ethnic geography on minority electoral behavior. Russia’s ethnic federalism makes it a particularly interesting case since this type of federal structure arguably has direct and indirect effects of its own. Historically, ethnic federalism has advanced minority elites in leadership positions and promoted minorities’ geographic concentration and resistance to assimilation. We use census and electoral data disaggregated to the raion-level (roughly equal to a US county) to analyze the voting behavior of specific ethnic groups. We also use a multilevel framework, which allows us to capture the extent of the variation in our dependent variables--voter turnout and minority vote share--that is explained by the various levels of analysis, including raions, electoral districts, and federal regions. Our initial findings suggest that each level of ethnic concentration has a mobilizing effect on minorities.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 200 words || 
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4. Schmuhl, Margaret., Mills, Colleen. and Pelletier, Emily. "Policing the Minority Threat: Police Misconduct against Minorities as an Outcome of Minority Group Threat" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030972_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Existing literature investigates several aspects of policing as an outcome of group conflict, specifically minority group threat. Group conflict theories assert that white intolerance manifests in response to growing minority presence, which is perceived as a competitive threat to white political and economic interests (Green, Strolovich, & Wong, 1998, p. 373). In response to minority presence, the dominant group seeks to preserve its dominance through social control (Blalock, 1967). In particular, King (2007) explains that geographic areas with higher levels of minorities tend to experience higher levels of social control. As such, several studies (Campbell, Berk, & Fyfe, 1998; Holmes, 2000; Jacobs & O'Brien, 1998; Kane, 2002; Kane, 2003; Kane, Gustafson, & Bruell, 2013) demonstrate areas with higher levels of minorities experience higher levels of policing activities, including police deployment, misdemeanor arrests, use of physical, excessive, and deadly force, and other misconduct. This cross-sectional analysis uses 2010 data from the National Police Misconduct Statistics and Reporting Project (NPMSRP) to assess police misconduct against minorities as an outcome of minority group threat on the county level. The study utilizes the following indicators of minority group threat: percent black, percent Hispanic, demographic change, and economic indicators.

2011 - ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 318 words || 
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5. Salat, Levente., Cakal, Huseyin. and Hewstone, Miles. "Collective Action on Behalf of the Weaker: When a stronger minority group is willing to act on behalf of the weaker minority group." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, <Not Available>. 2018-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511361_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: A cross-sectional study was conducted to test whether relative deprivation, its affective appraisal, and group efficacy could predict collective action tendencies both for the disadvantaged ingroup (Hungarian) and for another minority group (Roma). Based on data from Hungarian university students from Transylvania-Romania (n=290), we used measures of contact with the Romanian majority and Roma, ingroup identification and shared grievances with Roma as predictors, group efficacy and relative deprivation for the ingroup and the disadvantaged outgroup as mediators and collective action tendencies for the ingroup and on behalf of the ethnic Roma outgroup. Our model provided support for positive relationship between contact with the advantaged Romanian majority and collective action tendencies for the ingroup and also on behalf of the disadvantaged outgroup via group efficacy, relative deprivation and acknowledgement of relative deprivation of the Roma. Consistent with the earlier research on collective action, social identification with the ingroup predicted collective action tendencies both for the ingroup and the outgroup Roma directly and indirectly via group efficacy, relative deprivation and acknowledgement of relative deprivation for the weaker out-group. Surprisingly, shared grievances and contact with Roma did not predict collective action tendencies on behalf of them. Results show that contact with the majority might have a spill-over effect on collective action for the weaker and more disadvantaged outgroup. An additional finding of the study was the strong moderating effect of anger. When anger was high contact with out-campus friends did not predict relative deprivation but when anger was low contact significantly and negatively predicted relative deprivation. The results reveal an intriguing link between intergroup contact and collective action on behalf of a weaker and more disadvantaged group causing the relatively stronger minority group to act both for its own position and to improve the weaker group’s position. Affective appraisal of the perceived injustice by the stronger minority group also seems to influence collective action tendencies on behalf of the weaker minority.

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