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2008 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 101 words || 
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1. Baron, Michelle. "Reconfiguring Queer Mourning: "Monday Night in Westerbork" and the Theatricality of Memorial" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Millennium Hotel, Cincinnati, OH, Jun 18, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233429_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: S. Bear Bergman’s one person show, Monday Night in Westerbork, alternates between Bergman relating hir journey to Eastern Europe to trace the story of Max Ehrlich, and Max, giving the comedy show he would have given if he had survived the Holocaust. Bergman reframes mourning/memorial as a process of community-building and theater-making. I unpack this turn to comedy and storytelling as a queer and Jewish mode of memorialization. I consider the rituals of theater-making alongside rituals of funerary practice to elucidate how the language and practices of performance, theatricality, and humor operate in grappling with loss and legacies of trauma.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 85 words || 
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2. Varano, Sean., Schafer, Joseph. and Jarvis, John. "Climate and Crime: Rainy Days are Mondays or Hot Saturday Nights?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1146917_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This work stems from a study examining atmospheric conditions as a correlate of reported crime rates. In this particular effort a wider array of weather and atmospheric data than employed in previous work are examined in an effort to explore possible links between climatic change and variation in crime rates. Such notions as “it’s not the heat but the humidity” and “it’s a full moon…” are also examined as to their apparent veracity. Practical implications for policy and police operations are also noted.

2009 - 94th Annual Convention Words: 428 words || 
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3. Conway, Jr., James. "Beyond 1968: The 1969 Black Monday Protest in Memphis, Tennessee" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377826_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The Black Monday protest of 1969 in Memphis reveals how the civil rights struggle shifted from gradual to immediate action. All facets of the Black community (education, workers, organizations, etc.) united to create changes because they were tired of receiving less respect, pay, and recognition as their white counterparts. The Black Monday protest reveals how the fight against discrimination and racism in education unified the Black Memphians to fight against these problems throughout the city.
The NAACP was at the center of the civil rights movement in Memphis. The latter part of the 1960s presented the organization with new challenges. The formation of the Ghetto Development project came as a result of negotiations in which the organization’s local branches began taking direct action against merchants in Black neighborhoods who did not hire “Negroes in proportion to the business done by them.” The Memphis branch began boycotting and picketing local stores a month after the NAACP National convention. This direct action tactics led to the Bellevue-McLemore Shopping Center hiring a large number of Blacks.
The organization’s direct action tactics gained popularity in the Black community and by the end of the year, the NAACP had exceeded its membership goal of 10,000 by 1,500 members. The organization also had a new leader in Ezekiel Bell, the head of the Ghetto Development Project who organized the boycotts and pickets of local merchants. Therefore, when the organization began its Black Monday campaign, it had already prepared the community and had its support.
Through these radical measures, the Black Monday campaign occurred in four phases. The first phase of the boycott included students being absent or leaving schools on Mondays and participating in marches. Students who did not participate still became involved in the boycott because parents pulled them out of schools and most of the schools in Black neighborhoods were forced to close. Second, teachers participated in the boycott and marches because they were refused entry into the city’s Board of Education building. Third, the formation of the United Black Coalition expanded the boycott to include the striking St. Joseph hospital workers and other organizations in the city. This caused the boycott’s effort to combine the fight for education and labor. Although the boycott was already taking place, marches intensified during this phase to include an economic boycott of white downtown businesses. Lastly, a nine member biracial committee negotiated a deal with the NAACP in which the organization compromised on their demands, bringing an official end to their involvement and causing many executives to resign.

2011 - AASHE Pages: unavailable || Words: 727 words || 
Info
4. Pats, Laura., Furhman, David. and Loglisci, Ralph. "Meatless Monday at Johns Hopkins University" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AASHE, D. L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 09, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p518408_index.html>
Publication Type: Briefing
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Meatless Monday is a program that JHU Dining launched in November 2010. The national Meatless Monday campaign was launched in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF). CLF serves as the campaign’s scientific advisor. The purpose of implementing Meatless Monday on JHU’s Homewood campus was two-fold. We wanted to promote food options that were healthy for both students as well as for the environment. To accomplish this, we structured the Meatless Monday campaign around our proprietary wellness program, Hopkins Healthy Options, with an emphasis on making students’ diets healthier and more sustainable.

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 2145 words || 
Info
5. Gilrane, Colleen., Allen, Kathryn., Boyce, Kelly., Lohr, Margaret. and Swafford, Kristi. "Monday Nights at Panera: Exploring the Use of Cultural-Historical Activity Theory as a Lens for Understanding Professional Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p662629_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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