Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,859 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 572 - Next  Jump:
2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 174 words || 
Info
1. Ben-Nun-Bloom, Pazit. "What makes a political issue moral: moral emotions, the moral domain, and political ideology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361798_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: What are moral issues? Empirical political science literature currently refers to a political matter as moral issue, based on the subjective perception of either the researcher or the respondents—without illuminating exactly what is it that makes some issues seem moral to some people—and suggests that ideology moderates moralizing of political issues. For instance, studies had argued, following the 2004 exit polls, that conservatives are higher in moral conviction. This paper develops theory and methodology for rigorously identifying moral issues and test for moderation by ideology. Two theories are employed to define moral conviction theoretically and operationally: Domain Theory and Sentimentalism. Next, two samples were collected to validate the measures and compare political issues on moral conviction. Results show Liberals and Conservatives moralize to the same extent, but differ in the particular issues moralized. For example, while the two issues highest on moral conviction for Conservatives are unsurprisingly gay adoption and abortion, Liberals show the strongest moral conviction on torture and capital punishment. Implications for political campaigns and for the dysfunctional public debate are discussed.

2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 4938 words || 
Info
2. Passini, Stefano. and Villano, Paola. "Judging Moral Issues in a Multicultural Society: The Role of Moral Inclusion and Moral Exclusion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306707_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The issue of how people develop moral knowledge and moral judgment is of theoretical and empirical importance in psychological literature. The cognitive-developmental approach is still the predominant today. However, a full account of morality may start from Kohlberg’s individual moral development, but it must recognize that intra-individual variations may reflect different individual ways of thinking about the social world. In this research, the individual conception of community and the boundaries within which people apply their sense of justice is considered as an evidence of the intra-individual variations on moral reasoning. The short-form of the Defining Issue Test was administered to 360 Italian participants. The classical dilemmas were changed by varying the identity of the protagonist of each dilemma. So each participant responded to three dilemmas, one about an Italian (ingroup), one about an American (considered as belonging to a morally-included community), and lastly one about a Rumanian person (considered as belonging to a morally-excluded community). The results effectively show that people’s moral reasoning is different according to the people being judged. If the person submitted to judgment belonged to a morally-excluded community, participants used an harsher morality, whereas if the person belonged to a morally-included community, participants tended to be more lenient and indulgent.

2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 258 words || 
Info
3. Liu, Brittany., Ditto, Peter., Graham, Jesse., Haidt, Jonathan., Iyer, Ravi. and Koleva, Spassena. "Morality’s grip on politics: Moral foundations strengthen and weaken coherence between moral and factual beliefs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570835_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Liberals and conservatives have starkly different factual beliefs when it comes to morally-laden political issues, such as whether or not forceful interrogations produce actionable intelligence. Recent work shows that these differences in factual beliefs stem from different moral visions of liberals and conservatives, such that people seek coherence between intuitive feelings about a policy’s morality and factual beliefs about its costs and benefits (Liu & Ditto, 2012). For instance, the more capital punishment is deemed inherently immoral, the more it is seen as unlikely to deter crime (low benefit) and likely to lead to wrongful executions (high cost). Characteristics like conservatism and moral conviction are also known to strengthen this effect, suggesting that other factors such as the endorsement of various moral foundations (Haidt & Graham, 2007) should also strengthen the coherence between moral and factual beliefs. The present study, a survey of over 1500 respondents to the website yourmorals.org, found that greater endorsement of three foundations (moral concerns about purity, authority, and in-group loyalty) strengthened the coordination between moral and factual beliefs. The other two foundations (harm and fairness) weakened this association. This pattern of effects was consistent across four issues: capital punishment, stem cell research, promoting condom-use to teenagers, and forceful interrogations. The five foundations appear to affect moral coherence in different ways: purity, authority, and in-group foundations strengthen while harm and fairness foundations attenuate the relationship between moral and factual beliefs. Implications for Moral Foundations Theory and the link between morality and political beliefs are discussed.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 104 words || 
Info
4. Herman, Shaina. and Pogarsky, Greg. "Morality and Criminal Intent: An Examination of Morality, Situational Moral Cues and Criminality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1344352_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Abstract: The role that morality plays in the decision making process of offenders is often neglected. A growing body of work has demonstrated that morality may be an important factor in both criminal propensity and offender decision-making. The extant literature is limited however, as it typically employs general tautological measures and fails to fully inform the role that morality plays. This study seeks to advance this literature by utilizing a survey with more comprehensive measures of morality. Additionally, this study employs an experimental design using hypothetical vignettes intended to assess the extent to which the situation or setting may prime moral awareness and promote conformity.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 4938 words || 
Info
5. Svetieva, Elena. and Shaw, Allison. "Emotion Perception, Moral Foundations and Deception: How Recognition of Emotion in Others Affects Moral Foundations and Moral Communication Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p715459_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study tested the idea that certain moral foundations are influenced by elementary empathic processes of facial emotion recognition, and that moral foundations in turn affect the extent to which individuals will engage in moral communication behavior – i.e. deception. Two hundred and forty seven undergraduate students completed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ; Graham et al., 2011) and a facial emotion recognition task (PERT ER-40; Gur et al., 2002), in addition to indicating the number of lies told in a 24-hour period. Results indicate that the moral foundation of harm/care is associated with both sensitivity to anger and fear facial expressions as well as the tendency to tell fewer lies. Additionally, individuals who reported telling fewer lies also showed greater accuracy in recognizing facial expressions of anger. Results are discussed in terms of the role of primary emotion recognition processes in shaping moral foundations and the learning of moral behavior.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 572 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy