Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 90 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 18 - Next  Jump:
2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 52 pages || Words: 17278 words || 
Info
1. Tessman, Brock. "Role Deficit and Surplus in pre-World War One Europe: Comparing British, French and German Policy During the 1905 Moroccan Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69836_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 37 pages || Words: 1480 words || 
Info
2. Mundy, Jacob. "The Limits of Coercion and Co-Optation: The Case of the Moroccan Administered Western Sahara" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253782_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Moroccan government has occupied parts of Western Sahara for three decades, ample time to win the hearts and minds of the native Sahrawis.The regimes under King Hassan II (d. 1999) and his son, Mohammed VI, have deeply invested the Moroccan state into Western Sahara —financially, militarily and morally. Yet in recent years visible displays of pro-independence sentiment have been on the rise in the Moroccan controlled Western Sahara. These are clear indications thatthe Moroccan government has failed to make citizens out of many Sahrawis. There are numerous reasons — political, economic, socio-cultural — grounding Sahrawi resistance to ‘Moroccanization’.This study, however, focuses on Morocco’s reliance upon physical coercion and political co-optation in Western Sahara. These two keyMoroccan tactics of control, this study argues, have created resistance instead of obedience. This study will show the conditions from whichthe present reality of Sahrawi resistance has emerged by historicizing violence and political manipulation in, first, Moroccan ideology andinfrapolitics and, secondly, in Western Sahara. In demonstrating a direct linkage between Morocco’s recourse to coercion and co-optation,on the one hand, and the Sahrawi opposition it fuels, on the other, this study is thus able to conclude that these two tactics haveundermined Morocco’s efforts to annex Western Sahara.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5674 words || 
Info
3. Parmentier, Mary Jane. "Moroccan Islamism, the State, and the Changing Political-Religious Field in Morocco since the Transition of Monarchy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p413273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the surfacing of Moroccan participants in Al Qaeda-linked terrorist activities in Morocco, Spain and other locations, Islamism in Morocco continues to be shaped largely by the political and social environment of the country. This is evidenced most

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 195 words || 
Info
4. Kirdis, Esen. "Between Islamists and Global Civil Society: Understanding the Motivations behind the Transnationalization of the Moroccan Justice and Spirituality Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502073_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Moroccan Islamist movement Justice and Spirituality (JSM) is a bundle of contradictions: it is illegal and repressed but never uses violence; it is committed to democracy but rejects entering elections; and it aims to "Islamize modernity" but is critical of Orthodox Islam and hence is shunned by other Islamists. Recently, JSM has started to transnationalize its agenda by appealing to global civil society. Hence, I ask in this paper "Why is a domestic-oriented Islamist movement reaching for global civil society actors?" To answer this question, I will look into three venues where the JSM has gone transnational in its demands: (1) in publicizing the trials of its leaders, (2) its websites, and through (3) its civil society branches in Europe and in the US. I argue that Keck and Sikkink's (1998) advocacy networks theory can explain this strategy where "domestic groups, facing closed domestic institutions, make appeals to international institutions and transnational allies to pressure states to make appropriate policy changes." This development shows how an Islamist movement can enter a puzzling alliance with a West-dominated global civil society in order to support its bottom-up challenge to the nation-state through transnational channels from above.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 203 words || 
Info
5. Brown, James. "Tradition, transition, and language: The struggle for the Moroccan curriculum in the Twentieth century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493916_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the history of Moroccan education in the 20th century, with the specific focus on the Moroccan curriculum before, during and after the French protectorate. As a complex land of multilingualism, multiculturalism, political liberalization and economic reform, Morocco has sustained many struggles over what should be in the curriculum and how it should be implemented. With the advent of the French protectorate in 1912, and Morocco’s first resident general, Marshall Louis Hubert Lyautey, the education system and curriculum shifted from Quranic-based lessons to Western-style education system that more closely resembled that of similar French colonies in Africa, and thus seemingly propelled Morocco in to a more modern schooling structure through what can be argued as an indoctrinating curriculum. As a result, and following the fall of the protectorate in 1956, questions of nationalism and multilingualism have fueled the debate over the education system in Morocco, furthering the struggle for a truly Moroccan curriculum. Combining a historical overview with an evaluation of current programs and paradigms in Moroccan education, this paper aims to explore how multilingualism in Morocco factors in curricular development and ways in which students shape their own cultural identities through education.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 18 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy