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2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Pages: 49 pages || Words: 14717 words || 
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1. Woodson, Ben. "Anxiety and Motivated Reasoning - A Threat Based Cognitive Motivational Model of Motivated Reasoning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370415_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The main hypothesis of this paper is that an increase in state and trait anxiety will cause an increase in motivated reasoning. A situation that increases state anxiety will increase motivated reasoning, and those people who are high on trait anxiety will have higher motivated reasoning at all times. The experiment to test this hypothesis will also test the effects of anger and positive affect on motivated reasoning, but the expected results and theory involving these two emotions has not been developed yet.

The cognitive-motivational model of anxiety and motivated reasoning is based on threat. The two basic forms of motivated reasoning tested in this paper – disconfirmation bias and confirmation bias – can be thought of as the avoidance of threat. The disconfirmation bias is when someone counter-argues against an attitude-incongruent argument or avoids the threat of that argument by diminishing its threatening nature. The confirmation bias is the tendency of people to read attitude-congruent arguments rather than attitude-incongruent argument. This is the avoidance of threat because the attitude-incongruent arguments are identified as a threat and then avoided by reading the attitude-congruent information. Anxiety will lead to an increase in both of these because an increase in anxiety increases the likelihood someone will identify a stimulus as a threat. When a stimulus is identified as a threat, the person then engages in motivated reasoning to “flee” the threat. The experiment that will be discussed in the paper will be conducted in March or April.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 142 words || 
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2. Duriez, Stephanie. and Sullivan, Christopher. "Adding Motivation to the Model: The Role of Motivation in Juvenile Drug Court Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1276327_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While there is a sound research base identifying pre-treatment factors associated with successful completion among juveniles in drug court mandated treatment, there is relatively little research examining the effect of motivation on those outcomes. Results from the existing literature that consider motivation are fairly inconsistent and more research is necessary. The present study considers whether the addition of a measure of baseline motivation levels improves the odds of successful completion among juveniles in court mandated treatment, as well as the degree to which motivation moderates other factors relevant to successful treatment completion. Data from 484 youth administered the Texas Christian University Client Evaluation of Self at Intake (CEST) survey upon referral to drug court between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed. Using multivariate logistic regression, and controlling for pre-treatment factors identified in the literature, motivation and its possible moderating effects are tested.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Zheng, Xia., Almond, Anthony. and Yan, Harry YaoJun. "Trait Motivational Reactivity Modulates Moral Motives and Political Orientations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1363454_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study seeks to understand how trait motivational reactivity influences people’s moral motives and political orientations. Specifically, it is designed to test the hypothesis that political conservatism and proscriptive moral motives are based in the aversive motivational system, whereas political liberalism and prescriptive moral motives are based in the appetitive motivational system. Preliminary results from a survey using undergraduate subjects suggest that people’s moral motives and political orientations do not necessarily have a fixed relationship with trait motivational reactivity as previous research suggested. Contrast to existing theoretical proposals, this study found evidence that defensive motivational system can drive subject’s promotion of prescriptive moral motives (i.e., social justice) that in turn influences their political orientations.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 7542 words || 
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4. Doherty, David. "Perceived Motivations in the Political Arena: Motivated Reasoning and Institutional Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210337_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The American public tends to distrust elected representatives. This distrust appears to be rooted, at least in part, in a belief that politicians are driven by unsavory motivations. However, given that motives are unobservable and that more than one motive might explain a politician's behavior, why do citizens tend to explain representatives' behavior as driven by undesirable rather than desirable motives? Moreover, it is not even clear which motives people see as most desirable. In this research I leverage the power of an experimental design to examine how people make inferences about representatives' motives and how these motives are connected with one another and with evaluations of Congress. My findings offer insight into the standards people hold representatives to,
and why they so rarely believe these standards are met.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 10083 words || 
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5. Chung, Sungeun., Waks, Leah., Meffert, Michael. and Xie, Xiaoying. "Voters’ Motivation and Information Processing: A Model of Motivated Information Processing in a Political Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p170140_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study proposed a model of motivation and information processing in a political campaign and tested the model with a computer-based experiment (N = 344). Combining a directional motivation (motivation to a particular candidate which is predicted by strength of party identification) and a nondirectional motivation (motivation to think about election which is predicted by the level of interest in politics) four types of voters were identified. Four types of voters are expected to show different patterns of biased information processing. Voters with strong party identification and high interest in politics were expected to show the highest degree of biased information processing. When specific information about candidates’ issue-position was presented, higher degree of biased processing was also expected. The pattern of biased information processing was examined with candidate evaluation trajectories, which consisted of candidate evaluation at 11 time-points. It was found that participants with strong party identification and high interest in politics were less likely to change the initially preferred candidate, took longer time to change the initially preferred candidate, and changed candidate evaluation more slowly in response to a series of attitudinally incongruent information about candidates than other groups of participants.

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