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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 38 words || 
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1. Erdi Lelandais, Gülçin. "Understanding Social Movements in the South - Does Social Movement Theory Matter to Understand No Global Movements? A Perspective from Turkey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415209_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This communication has two main aims: to present, on the basis of empirical research, some of the characteristics of the so called alterglobalist movement, and to develop reflect upon the Southern dimension of this movement. Although many transnational

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6479 words || 
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2. Hohle, Randolph. "Analysis of State and Movement Tactical Decisions and Repertoires in the Black Civil Rights Movement 1960-65: Utilizing Field Theory in Social Movement Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103788_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recent social movement research highlights the need for a stronger theory of agency in social movements. Drawing from Pierre Bourdieu’s work on fields and insights from Governmentality scholars, this paper offers an analysis of how protest strategy is interwoven in collective action repertories. Rather than reproduce cultural debates of structure versus agency, I will argue that insights found in field theory allows for an analysis of social movement strategy based on the relationship between repertoires (structure) and tactical decisions (agency). This analysis aims to understand the interrelationship of social movements and state actors in order to assess how social movements’ are structured, in part, around possibilities tied to their social positioning in the field. I illustrate this with an analysis of how SCLC and local southern municipalities implemented and revised tactical decisions. I show that SCLC implemented tactical decisions based on which local municipalities would respond dramatically and violently in order to maximize the amount of symbolic meaning from their available forms of protest. Despite having the means of legitimate violence, local municipalities were split on whether to engage the protests violently or situate their tactics in discourses of non-violence, thus creating a political opportunity for social change via elite cleavages.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 11535 words || 
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3. Skuratowicz, Katarzyna. "Religious fundamentalist movements: social movements in the World System? Case study of the Maitatsine Movement in Nigeria, 1980-85." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32519_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study is a historical analysis of reasons and dynamics behind the emergence of fundamentalist religious movements. Its purpose is to develop a new conceptual apparatus to the approach toward religious fundamentalist movements that would analyze both external and internal factors influencing their emergence. It is a case study of an Islamic fundamentalist religious movement called Maitatsine in Nigeria. The theoretical background is based upon the concepts of international division of labor, the role of the state and social institutions, and the national culture taken from the world system theory, which explain the external factors influencing the dynamics in West Africa, the region where the analyzed religious movement emerged. Analysis of the factors at the micro level is provided with the social movements theories’ concepts of mobilization and framing, which explain the organization of religious movements. Historical context, with the history of Islam, colonialism, and post-independence period in Nigeria are presented in order to provide a background for the study of the Maitatsine movement. Findings indicate that the world dynamics significantly influence economic and political realities of peripheries with weak states and institutions. They provoke the increase of the “disinherited” social groups in the capitalist secular system, which include mainly immigrants, foreigners, and thus, members who were different than the dominant ethnic groups in big cities. Consequently, this inflames rising feelings of grievance toward the dominant western culture that is directed by charismatic religious leaders. Religious ideology becomes a strong mobilizing and framing factor.

2010 - 95th Annual Convention Words: 266 words || 
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4. Rogers, Ibram. "A Social Movement of Social Movements: Conceptualizing a New Historical Framework for the Black Power Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436208_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black Power Studies historians and their predecessors have regularly explored the local, tactical, and ideology diversity in the black power movement, and some have even independently described these diversity elements as movements. This paper takes the diversity consensus a step further and fuses the independent ideas of historians to present a new historiographical framework for the black power movement of the 1960s and 1970s. I argue it was a social movement of social movements. This collection of movements can be examined and understood from a spatial frame or strategic frame. Spatially, it was an international collection of local black power movements containing activists with varying objectives. In other words, there was a semi-distinct Philadelphia black power movement, Chicago black power movement, Atlanta black power movement, and unique black power movements in most Black communities. Strategically, the movement was an assortment of twenty transnational social movements waged by distinct activist groupings who applied the same general strategies in each locale. Black laborers, Black students, Black feminists, Black artists, Black prisoners, Black cadets, Black professionals, and many more groups all forged movements that together comprise the Black Power Movement, this paper reveals. The spatial frame and local diversity is a generally an accepted historiographical premise in the literature. However, the strategic frame that purports multiple strategic movements is not nearly as recognized. Therefore, a portion of the paper provides an overview of each of the twenty strategic social movements. It concludes discussing the constructive and destructive relationships between these movements, and their legacy in the 21st century.

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