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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 6622 words || 
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1. Mutchler, Matt., colemon, leonardo., Neith, Katie. and Davtyan, Mariam. "Differences by Race/ethnicity and Partner Gender in Safer Sex Strategies and Stigma among HIV+ MSMW" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21207_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Introduction: Little is known about the sexual risk behaviors of HIV+ men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) since they are often grouped with gay men. The female sexual partners of HIV+ MSMW may be particularly vulnerable to HIV infection.
Methods: This study recruited a convenience sample of 150 HIV+ MSMW (50 Caucasian, 50 Latino, and 50 African American) at HIV/AIDS service organizations. Between August 2003 and July 2004, the respondents completed 90 minute interviewer-administered cross-sectional surveys. Domains included demographics, sexual risk behaviors, HIV status and bisexuality disclosure, HIV and sexual stigma, substance use, and safer sex communication. Univariate, bivariate and logistic regression analyses of the data identified differences by race/ethnicity and predictors of unprotected sex with female and male primary sexual partners.
Results: Perceptions of stigma, disclosure behaviors, and communication patterns differ significantly depending on race/ethnicity and gender of primary partners. Sexual stigma and safer sex communication predicted unprotected sex with female primary partners. HIV status of partner predicted unprotected sex with male primary partners.
Conclusion: HIV prevention interventions for HIV+ MSMW should be tailored to race/ethnicity and partner gender, and should stress serosorting strategies, safer sex communication and sexual stigma.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 197 words || 
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2. Benoit, Ellen. "Childhood Sexual Abuse, Substance Use and Concealed Behavior among Black MSMW" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 16, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436977_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will present findings from qualitative interviews with 33 bisexually active Black men (MSMW) who were interviewed as part of a study investigating how drug use affects men’s same-sex activity and what factors influence their decisions to conceal that activity from their female partners. Several men reported trading sex for drugs or for the money to purchase drugs, and many men said that they were less likely to use condoms while high. Nearly one-quarter of the sample also volunteered that they had been sexually molested as children. Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with high-risk sex among MSM, and some studies have found that its effects on sexual risk are mediated by substance use. The men interviewed often expressed feelings of shame regarding their same-sex behavior and some drew connections between their CSA experiences and drug use and their decision to have sex with other men. They also cited homophobic community norms as barriers to disclosing their behavior to others. The findings highlight the need to ensure that HIV prevention and substance abuse programs provide sensitive and safe environments in which Black MSMW can discuss CSA and other sources of shame related to their same-sex behavior.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
Info
3. Downing, Martin. and Benoit, Ellen. "Impact of Incarceration on Relationships with Female Partners among Non-gay-Identified Black MSMW" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 19, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675194_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Disproportionate incarceration of Black men increases HIV risk in the Black community, in part by removing men from the pool of partners available to women. Research also indicates that longer sentences increase the odds of unprotected sex with women among Black men who have sex with men. How incarceration affects existing and future relationships with female partners, and how this may influence HIV transmission risk, is unclear, particularly for men who have sex with both men and women (MSMW) after release. This presentation uses focus group data with formerly incarcerated, non-gay-identified Black MSMW to explore issues of relationship deterioration, strategies for disclosure of same-sex behavior, and HIV risk factors. In addition to sexual frustration and desire, participants discussed multiple co-occurring structural and interpersonal barriers that influence the trajectory of existing relationships with female partners. Post-release continuation of same-sex behavior (accompanied by alcohol and drug use), curiosity and questioning by female partners, as well as fears of discovery, stigmatization and rejection were also considered within the context of HIV prevention and the “down low” lifestyle. Understanding the impact of incarceration on relationship dynamics is critical to developing effective interventions that address multiple risk factors among this vulnerable population.

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