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2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: unavailable || Words: 1900 words || 
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1. Durairaj, Manju. "Indian Music and Western General Music Education: Introducing Indian Music in an Elementary General Music Education Setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547051_index.html>
Publication Type: Workshop/Demonstration
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Indian music is the music of the Indian subcontinent. It is the music of India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Bangladesh. Indian music has two branches, North Indian or Hindustani music and South Indian or Carnatic music. Carnatic music is practiced in the four South Indian states of Karnataka, Tamil Nad, Kerala and Andhra Pradesh. An increasing number of nations now connect with each other through the travel, internet, television and radio. Cultures and traditions are subject to pervading global influences. Indian music with its evocative melodies and rhythms, is gaining popularity all around the world. Indian music, with its roots steeped in antiquity is complex and intricate, but now, more than ever before, it is accessible even in the elementary classroom. Melody and rhythm are the fundamental concepts of most musical traditions. In this workshop, participants explore these concepts in Indian music through movement, song and speech percussion pieces. The workshop aims to provide music educators with concrete lesson ideas that will be effective in the music classroom. The focus of the workshop will be on the music and dances of the Indian subcontinent. The religious practices in the region greatly influence the music. Hence the festivals of Ramadan and Diwali will be discussed. Participants will be led through the teaching process of Dandiya (stick) dances, and Orff arrangements of Ramadan and Diwali percussion pieces, songs and dances. All of the above pieces maybe integrated successfully in any performance that celebrates diversity. Each piece will be presented using the Orff processes of movement, body percussion, and performing on Orff instruments. Participants will be provided with handouts that include lesson plans on introducing Indian Music in the General Music classroom and sheet music and Orff arrangements of the songs.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 258 words || 
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2. Chang, Che-Jung. "A Study of Music Preferences and Emotions of Classical Music Through Movie Music at the Vocational High School Music Classes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398277_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the students’ preference and emotions of classical music will be different throughout movie music experiences or not, and to determine what’s the students’ emotions while listening. The researcher selected the film “Together” directed by Kaige Chen and used this film’s underscore (the third movement of “Scottish Fantasia” composed by Bruch). Participants (N=79) were selected from two classes from one vocational high school: students from one of the classes previewed the film, and the others didn’t. After the movie session, all participants were asked to listen the third movement of “Scottish Fantasia,” and answered the questionnaire related to their preference and emotions.

There were three questions in the questionnaire. The first question asked students to indicate preference on a 10-point semantic differential scale (dislike/like). The second question asked students to check their emotions while listening the music on a checklist revised from the emotions tree of music textbook, include 24 emotional adjectives. The last question was open-ended question for participants to describe their feeling about the music.

Results showed no significant difference in preference between the two classes. However, the film group had more emotional response (N=24) than non-film group (N=21). The major emotions of film group were “elegant” (n=22), “peaceful” (n=16), and “noble” (n=15); and the major emotions of non-film group were “elegant” (n=28), “tender” (n=22), and “lyric” (n=21). The future study would select more participants or different elements such as a film with actors familiar and/or preferred by students to determine is there any differences in preference and emotions.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 347 words || 
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3. Ishii, Yuri. and Shiobara, Mari. "Perception of Japanese Music, Music of Our Country, and Hometown Music by Different Generations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397929_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2006, the new Fundamental Law of Education was passed in Japan. One of the notable changes from the previous law of 1947 has to do with the aims of education that attach importance to Japanese traditional culture. It is clearly stated that education in Japan should value and work towards transmitting cultural tradition as well as creating new culture. Article 2, number 5 states as an aim that students should “respect tradition and culture and love (aisuru), our country (wagakuni), and hometown (kyoudo), as well as cultivate attitudes towards respecting other nations and contribute to world peace and development.” Accordingly, the new School Education Act of 2007 confirms this by instructing teachers to “initiate children for the correct understanding of the present situation and history of our country and hometown, as well as respecting their tradition and culture. They should also cultivate attitudes for loving our country and hometown…” The new 2008 course of study for music in the secondary schools reflects this change.

Using a cross-generational survey, this paper investigated what kinds of music were regarded by Japanese people as Japanese traditional music culture and sought both differences and commonalities in the characteristics of music presented by different generations. A questionnaire survey was carried out between 2 different generations of Japanese in the Tokyo area: young university students; people over 60 years of age. The subjects were asked to write down titles of music under three categories: “Japanese Music,” “Music of Our Country,” and “Hometown Music.” These categories of music are frequently mentioned in the course of study in relation to music culture. The results indicated that, while the older generation tended to present varieties of diverse titles of music associated with these music categories, the younger generation was inclined to present titles of music that they learned from music textbooks in the classroom. The result infers that young people need richer experiences of Japanese traditional music, both inside and outside schools, if education in Japan is to value and work towards a transmission of cultural tradition as well as the creation of new culture.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 346 words || 
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4. Olsen, Prof. Jens. "Multiple Musical Intelligences: Towards a Differentiated View on Musicality and the Impact on the Organization of Music Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548417_index.html>
Publication Type: Accepted as Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the last 10-20 years the educational debate has changed from an interest in teaching to an interest in learning, that is, a change in perspective from teacher to pupil. In this connection, two theories in particular have had an impact: Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences and Dunn & Dunn’s theory of learning styles. Both theories reflect the premise that children, and people in general, learn differently. There is no single way of teaching which universally has proven to be the best. Education must, however, always reflect the student's personal character as well as the culture and societal conditions that always apply.
Based on Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, this paper will bring new considerations on the phenomenon of musicality, and the way in which Gardner's intelligence theory can be considered from a musical point of view and what implications this might have on the organization of music education, both in compulsory music education in schools as well as for the more specialist instrumental and vocal tuition. In Gardner’s masterpiece 'Frames of Mind' (1983), which has had a great deal of influence on pedagogic thinking in recent years, he mentions various types of intelligences which his research has described. These are: linguistic intelligence, the logical-mathematical, the bodily-kinesthetic, the spatial, the musical, and the two personality intelligences. This paper will show how we can draw parallels between Gardner's intelligence categories and the understanding of musicality, so the concept of musicality becomes more differentiated and a better tool for organizing music education that takes into account each student's special musical profile. In my presentation I will therefore describe characteristics of persons with predominantly linguistic musicality, mathematical musicality, melodic musicality, musical musicality, etc. An important point is that the more musicality areas a person masters, the more musically competent he or she is. For example, Mozart presumably must have been extremely competent in all areas. In the real world of music education, where students are not all small Mozart’s, it is therefore important to be able to identify the individual student's special potential.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9140 words || 
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5. Shevy, Mark. and Kristen, Susanne. "German Listeners’ Music-Genre Schemas for International and Domestic Popular Music: Differences in Cognitive Associations Associated With Exposure to Country, Hip-Hop, Punk, and German Folksy Music" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301271_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An online experiment tested for differences in the extramusical concepts that German listeners associate with hearing a few seconds of country, hip-hop, punk, or German folksy music. Country, hip-hop and punk are examples of international or “out-group” genres for German listeners, while German folksy music serves as an example of domestic “in-group” music. Results revealed significant differences between the genres in seven out of eight concepts measured: urban vs. rural culture, age, trustworthiness, expertise, attractiveness, friendliness, and political ideology. There was no significant difference in the eighth concept: ethnicity. Some differences between the genre stimuli were noted in mood valence, mood intensity, and listeners’ music identity/preference. Controlling for identity with the stimulus reduced the genre differences in trustworthiness to marginal significance. It also lowered the effect size for several other concepts, but they still remained statistically significant. In-group vs. out-group theory at a cultural level is proposed as an explanation for the differences in cognitive schemas for these genres.

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