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2012 - The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Words: 130 words || 
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1. Lazaridis, Nikolaos. ""Cyclops, you asked my name. My name is Nobody." Naming characters in Egyptian literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Renaissance Providence Hotel, Providence, RI, Apr 27, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555059_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The authors of ancient Egyptian literary works employed a number of narrative techniques in an attempt to tell their stories in a meaningful and efficient way, to emphasize the stories’ main messages, and to entertain their audiences. One of these techniques was the reference to historically known or fictional people as the stories’ literary characters, some of which were named (such as Sinuhe, Setna, or Apophis), while others were left anonymous (such as the shipwrecked sailor or the doomed prince). In this paper I will examine such instances of eponymous and anonymous characters in the corpus of Egyptian literary narratives, which extends from the early Middle Kingdom to the Roman era, and will interpret them as literary and cultural choices that influenced significantly the telling and meaning of these stories.

2007 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 8161 words || 
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2. Day, Janet. "What’s in a Name? The Sociological and Political Significance of Names and Naming in the Works of Emma Goldman and Charlotte Perkins Gilman" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143032_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In her social and political commentary, Emma Goldman’s pattern of name usage reveals the social significance that she places on the symbolism of names. A name can represent a personal or a social identity, signify a familial or a social relationship and confer social and professional status. Names and their usage reflect societal norms and institutions. Goldman’s pattern of usage of names is another tool of her critique. In her feminist utopia, Herland, Charlotte Perkins Gilman uses the act of naming as a social instrument to signify both social identity and community (given-name), individuality (descriptive-name) and progressivism (unique compound-names). In their use of names and naming, Goldman and Gilman critique patriarchy, the nuclear family and the nature of identity as they seek to create a more humane and just society for all.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 232 words || 
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3. Ruffer, Galya. "What’s in a Name? Naming Restrictions, Social Cohesion, and the Integration of Immigrants in the European Union" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236647_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: National regulation of naming in European Member States is broadly used as a form of social ordering and nation building. As diversity in Europe has increased, these state objectives are increasingly challenged. This project examines the legal controversies between immigrant communities and the state over naming in Germany, Belgium, and Denmark in order to assess the way in which standard legal regulations that have been in place for generations have an unstated connection to Christian tradition that serves as a barrier to integration of Muslim and other non-Christian immigrants. Recently there has been renewed attention on “social cohesion” in European integration policy. State policies in Germany, Denmark and Belgium have a new focus on education, language and citizenship tests to encourage immigrants to learn about and commit to the national constitutional and cultural tradition. The civic or constitutional patriotism these policies promote ignores the inherent Christian basis of the legal order. Unnoticed are the myriad legal regulations that inhibit the daily functioning of Muslim (or other non-Christian) private life and forcing these communities to bring claims for religious and ethnic identity into the public sphere. This study fills a gap in current understandings of what is perceived in European discourse to be “failed integration” by looking at the way in which traditional state laws that are often taken for granted and perceived as neutral inhibit the “life cycle” of an immigrant.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 9148 words || 
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4. Dechief, Diane. "Names as Keywords: Theorizing Immigration-Influenced Name Changes in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300256_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Canadian immigration and settlement practices have been altering individuals’ names since the mid-1800s. From the common explanations of immigration officials engaging in novel orthography as they completed forms, to families altering their names to make them easier for their neighbours to pronounce, a range of dominant cultural influences were at work. Today, these forces continue; they are evident in such techno-bureaucratic minutiae as maximum character lengths for permanent residents’ names, and in the decade-long policy encouraging people with the religiously-significant Sikh names ‘Kaur’ and ‘Singh’ to remove these names before applying to immigrate (CBC, July 2007). They are also heard in day-to-day introductions as some newcomers choose to use common English or French names to present themselves, and to potentially make themselves more employable (Ng et al., 2007).

With these and other scenarios in mind I ask, in what ways and through what means do minority culture members and migrants to Canada change their names? What roles do legislation, policy and state regulated data collection procedures have in these shifts? How are names altered through less official interactions? What implications do these name changes have for Canada as a nation-state? What are the outcomes in terms of nationalism or cultural pluralism?

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5797 words || 
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5. Sinclair-Palm, Julia. "Naming and Re-Naming Trans Youth: Ethical Considerations in Participant Representation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725106_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I explore the representational and ethical conflicts contained in choosing a name for research participants. I consider the role of anonymity and research practices like using pseudonyms, to discuss tensions of representation and narrative construction in research. I discuss the ways researchers navigate participant confidentiality and conceptualize their use of pseudonyms as a means to offer their participants anonymity. Working with Judith Butler’s Giving an Account of Oneself, I question what it means to do justice to someone’s personal narrative and chosen name in qualitative research. I explore these tensions through my dissertation research, a project about how trans youth choose a new name.

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