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2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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1. Bass, Marisa. "Hercules in Straits: Jan Gossart, Henry of Nassau, and an Ancient Hero in the Netherlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481810_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A painting of "Hercules with Deianira, nude figures of considerable size," caught the eye of the Italian courtier Antonio de Beatis during his 1517 visit to the palace of Henry of Nassau, governor of Holland and Zeeland. Although this large-scale work does not survive, a small extant painting of Hercules and Deianira by the Netherlandish artist Jan Gossart (ca. 1478–1532) dates to the same year and points to the authorship of the lost image. Gossart's paintings of mythological nudes — unprecedented in the art of the Low Countries — are generally interpreted as erotic images testifying to the artist's engagement with the antiquities of Rome. Taking the Hercules and Deianira as an example, this paper explores the neglected function of Gossart's paintings in relation to local historical consciousness in the Netherlands and to the way in which a patron like Henry of Nassau would have conceived his own ancient lineage.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
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2. Verhaegen, Sarah. "Paper Communication Media in the Early Modern Period: An Addition to Triumphal Ceremonies and Festivals as a Means of Mass Communication? The Case of Orange-Nassau (1568–1625)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481424_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The identity of early modern nobilities was linked to issues of honour, prestige and reputation. Noblemen could present themselves to the outside world in processions, solemn entries in cities and other festivals. This paper argues that an essential means of public presentation of noblemen and their (attempts to) interaction with the society has been neglected. Print culture played a catalyst role in the development of early modern society and the resulting effects on its social life. Moreover, administrators at different levels were aware of the impact of contemporary communication media. Precisely because of the 'public' importance paper communication media played within early modern society and the public attention noblemen received, the capacity to control these media was likely to have been crucial for them. Therefore, it needs to be examined to what extent aristocracies used paper communication media as a strategy to maintain their honour and reputation.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 148 words || 
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3. Chovanec, Kevin. "The Triumphs of Nassau: Forging a Pan-Protestant Literary Heroism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, Mar 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1046070_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 1610, Jan Janszoon Orlers, a Dutch writer and statesman in Leiden, published an account of the heroism of the House of Orange: Den Nassauschen Lauren-crans. The work was soon translated into nearly all the languages of Protestant Europe, including multiple French, German, and English editions from 1612 to 1620. I argue in this paper that Orlers and his translators were self-consciously catering to a pan-Protestant readership in order to depict the Dutch Revolt and, in later editions, the Thirty Years War, as shared military conflicts, attempting to mitigate national difference. The works resist a delimiting of literature to the political and linguistic borders of the nation-state, and instead imply that a shared Protestant culture might connect English, Scottish, Dutch, German, and French readers. Though the works serve as propaganda, they also demonstrate a kind of broad, transnational literary community that has been obscured by the nationalized canon.

2009 - 94th Annual Convention Words: 156 words || 
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4. Bradley, Stefan. "Upending Old Nassau: African American Student Activism at Princeton University, 1967-1970" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377633_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Assistant Professor Stefan Bradley (St. Louis University) will present a paper entitled “Upending Old Nassau: African American Student Activism at Princeton University, 1967-1970.” The paper will note the influence of the Civil Rights, Black Power and Student Power movements on an Ivy League university that was once categorized as one of the best country clubs in the nation. Indeed, Princeton University prided itself on being a leading American institution. This paper will illustrate that by first matriculating, then by creating an identity on campus, and finally by demonstrating for issues such as black student recruitment, a black studies program, and the university’s divestment of assets associated with apartheid South Africa, black students at Princeton helped to lead the elite university into a new era. The result of the students’ protest activity was an increase in black student population, an enhanced university curriculum, and a more thoughtful approach to the university’s investment strategies.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 136 words || 
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5. Verhaegen, Sarah. "The Media-Politics of the "Lesser" Nassau (ca. 1570–1620)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p526730_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: William of Orange, the leader of the Dutch Revolt and one of the most famous members of the family of Orange-Nassau, is known as a "propagandist," employing different paper communication media during the Revolt. However, apart from the prestigious princes of Orange, the lineage of William of Orange also included other relatives, the German counts of Nassau. These less prestigious members, the "lesser" Nassau, assisted their princely relatives in various ways, but received less attention in the scholarship on the lineage. Therefore, this paper has two aims. First, it sketches the relations between the "lesser" Nassau and the princes of Orange. Second, it deals with the media-politics of the "lesser" Nassau, understood as their attempts to reproduce, present, and communicate their social status to different publics in different contexts by the use of paper communication media.

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