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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 42 pages || Words: 13126 words || 
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1. Lluch, Jaime. "National Identity and Political Identity: The Impact of Majority-Nation Nationalism on Stateless Nations’ National Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 240 words || 
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2. Gustavsson, Gina. "Who Needs National Identity? Personality Interacting with Nationalism, National Identity and Pride in Explaining Solidarity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241458_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Does national identity boost trust and solidarity? The results from previous research remain inconclusive. The main reason for this, it has been argued, is that different studies measure the effects of different types of national identities, and sometimes also on different types of solidarity. This paper, by contrast, directs the searchlight at a third and hitherto completely neglected nuance that might further help explain the contradictory results: the potential interaction between national identity and personality. In other words, I suggest that even when the type of national identity is held constant, its effect differs across individuals in predictable ways. The failure to bring personality into the picture, I argue, is furthermore related to a second gap in previous research that this paper seeks to remedy: its surprising lack of discussion of the individual level mechanisms that mediate the relationship between national identity and solidarity. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop what we might call the psychological side of the theory of liberal nationalism, which holds that a strong national identity is crucial for maintaining support for the welfare state. The paper develops a set of novel hypotheses, about (1) the individual level mechanisms that would explain why national identity sometimes boosts cohesion, differentiating between sympathy, obligation, and trust; and (2) the interactions that we should expect between national identity and personality type. The hypotheses are tested with Dutch survey data from 2013-2014, using structural equation modelling.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 484 words || 
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3. Seo, Jungmin. "Nationalism in a Nation-State: Theorizing East Asian Nationalism(s)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study argues that nationalism in a stable nation-state should be understood as a hegemonic discourse that produces the factuality of nation and conditions the modes of domination and resistance. While not discounting the significance of the state and the elites, I argue that we need to highlight the unique features of the nationalistic discourses circulated in a stable nation-state, especially in East Asian states (China, Japan and Korea). Being nationalistic does not necessarily mean being ?pro-state? or ?pro-government? in a stable nation-state because nationalists project their loyalty upon the nation, an abstract but absolute political and historical subject, not toward the state which is supposed to be an agent deriving its authority from the ultimate sacredness of the nation. Therefore, the form of political struggle in a stable nation-state is determined by nationalistic cognition of the world in which each agent tries to gain the right to represent the collective interest of the nation. In general, the western nationalism scholarship has failed to provide an appropriate theoretical framework to interpret nationalisms in East Asian states. I believe this failure is caused by the following three reasons. First of all, the majority of nationalism theories consciously or unconsciously depend upon the top-down approach, based on a Eurocentric historiography. Hence, the conventional nationalism scholarship has not been able to provide an adequate explanation on why East Asian societies many times resist against the states in the name of ?nation? and ?nationalism.? Secondly, the nationalism scholarship inherently subscribes the deep dichotomy of ?modern? and ?tradition? to explain the emergence of the nation state. I, instead, argue that the national identity in East Asia was an outcome of a long process of the negotiation between modern and traditional identities. Therefore, a strong national identity does not necessarily mean a strong and successful state project of nationalization since a successful osmosis between new discourses of nationalism and the traditional dynastic identity would create a strong/coherent national identity even without the state project of nationalization. Finally, the nationalism scholarship has long sustained a negative connotation toward the practices of nationalism through consistent de-construction of national identities. I do not think that normative understanding of nationalism, either negative or positive, poses any serious threat to our analyses of nationalism. Nevertheless, when the normative judgment is associated with the efforts of unconditional deconstruction of the national identity, the nationalism scholarship fails to be an analytical tool to understand social phenomena. A nation as an imagined community does not mean that a nation is a false community. If political communities require an assumed collectivity beyond an individual?s actual life scope, political communities are real only when they are collectively imagined. Hence, to analyze the politics of nationalism properly, we need to go beyond a repetitive job of deconstruction. Rather, for analytic purposes, national identities should be treated as a social, political and historical fact through which public discourses are formed and shaped.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 35 words || 
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4. Mercurio, Elizabeth. ""Modern Standard Nationalism?" The Role of Demotic Arabic in the Construction of Egyptian Nationalism and National Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p310518_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although the presence of language in the construction of nationalist ideology and national identity is explicitly acknowledged in the literature on nationalism, the mechanisms by which language and language politics influence nationalism are often margina

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 186 words || 
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5. Mercurio, Elizabeth. ""Modern Standard Nationalism? The Role of Demotic Arabic in the Construction of Egyptian Nationalism and National Identity"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363657_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although the role of language in the construction of nationalist ideology and national identity is explicitly acknowledged in the literature on nationalism, the mechanisms by which language and language politics influence nationalism are often marginalized in the broader literature on comparative politics. In the Middle East/ North Africa region, a unique state of linguistic diglossia exists. Although Classical Arabic has been touted as the unifying language of the MENA region, it is no one’s native language, and the very nation that it purports to represent is fraught with political and cultural tensions. What then, is the role of the actual native languages (demotic Arabics) in the construction of national identity within MENA states? This paper examines this question through a detailed examination of the existing literature on language politics and national identity, arguing that three main factors can help us to determine the role of language in the construction of national identity: educational policy, print media, and the rhetoric of political leaders. An empirical case study (Egypt) evaluates these factors through an examination of demotic (Egyptian) Arabic in the construction of Egyptian nationalism and national identity.

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