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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 42 pages || Words: 13126 words || 
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1. Lluch, Jaime. "National Identity and Political Identity: The Impact of Majority-Nation Nationalism on Stateless Nations’ National Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 31 pages || Words: 10291 words || 
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2. Balci, Tamer. "From nationalization of Islam to Islamization of nation: Clash of Islam and secular nationalism in the Middle East" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254233_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper concentrates on the interaction of Islam and secular nationalism in the modern Middle East. Although the political power of Islam diminished with the rise of nationalism, it largely remained as a strong social force in the Middle East. While several Muslim political leaders spent efforts to create secular state structures, they still relied on the power of Islam for many practical reasons. From the 1920s on, the Middle East states aimed to take Islam under state control. Islam was taken under control so that secular nationalism could be initiated smoothly. However, based on the political conditions after WWII, the place of Islam in the Middle East was reevaluated by almost every Islamic state so that it could be used to promote the national interests. State control of Islam could be achieved only if Islam was nationalized through state propaganda and public education systems. Throughout the Middle East several Muslim states initiated projects to nationalize Islam. In this paper, I propose that the Muslim states’ desire to use Islam for their political interests paved the way for the rise of political Islam. What were the conditions that forced the political leaders to appeal the socio-political power of Islam? How the projects to nationalize Islam were carried out in the Middle East? Along with answering these questions, I will conclude my paper by answering two crucial questions: Why did the nationalization of Islam fail? Did the failure of these projects cause further Islamization of the Middle East.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 484 words || 
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3. Seo, Jungmin. "Nationalism in a Nation-State: Theorizing East Asian Nationalism(s)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study argues that nationalism in a stable nation-state should be understood as a hegemonic discourse that produces the factuality of nation and conditions the modes of domination and resistance. While not discounting the significance of the state and the elites, I argue that we need to highlight the unique features of the nationalistic discourses circulated in a stable nation-state, especially in East Asian states (China, Japan and Korea). Being nationalistic does not necessarily mean being ?pro-state? or ?pro-government? in a stable nation-state because nationalists project their loyalty upon the nation, an abstract but absolute political and historical subject, not toward the state which is supposed to be an agent deriving its authority from the ultimate sacredness of the nation. Therefore, the form of political struggle in a stable nation-state is determined by nationalistic cognition of the world in which each agent tries to gain the right to represent the collective interest of the nation. In general, the western nationalism scholarship has failed to provide an appropriate theoretical framework to interpret nationalisms in East Asian states. I believe this failure is caused by the following three reasons. First of all, the majority of nationalism theories consciously or unconsciously depend upon the top-down approach, based on a Eurocentric historiography. Hence, the conventional nationalism scholarship has not been able to provide an adequate explanation on why East Asian societies many times resist against the states in the name of ?nation? and ?nationalism.? Secondly, the nationalism scholarship inherently subscribes the deep dichotomy of ?modern? and ?tradition? to explain the emergence of the nation state. I, instead, argue that the national identity in East Asia was an outcome of a long process of the negotiation between modern and traditional identities. Therefore, a strong national identity does not necessarily mean a strong and successful state project of nationalization since a successful osmosis between new discourses of nationalism and the traditional dynastic identity would create a strong/coherent national identity even without the state project of nationalization. Finally, the nationalism scholarship has long sustained a negative connotation toward the practices of nationalism through consistent de-construction of national identities. I do not think that normative understanding of nationalism, either negative or positive, poses any serious threat to our analyses of nationalism. Nevertheless, when the normative judgment is associated with the efforts of unconditional deconstruction of the national identity, the nationalism scholarship fails to be an analytical tool to understand social phenomena. A nation as an imagined community does not mean that a nation is a false community. If political communities require an assumed collectivity beyond an individual?s actual life scope, political communities are real only when they are collectively imagined. Hence, to analyze the politics of nationalism properly, we need to go beyond a repetitive job of deconstruction. Rather, for analytic purposes, national identities should be treated as a social, political and historical fact through which public discourses are formed and shaped.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 31 words || 
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4. Kwon, Hyon. "Nationalism Revisited: Globalizing Nationalism to Nationalizing Globalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-01-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85019_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sweeping the international society, globalization exacerbates the potential for conflicts associated with nationalist sentiments. Forces of globalization and the state of underdevelopment are analyzed as primary contributors in fueling nationalism.

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