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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 42 pages || Words: 13126 words || 
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1. Lluch, Jaime. "National Identity and Political Identity: The Impact of Majority-Nation Nationalism on Stateless Nations’ National Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 31 pages || Words: 10291 words || 
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2. Balci, Tamer. "From nationalization of Islam to Islamization of nation: Clash of Islam and secular nationalism in the Middle East" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254233_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper concentrates on the interaction of Islam and secular nationalism in the modern Middle East. Although the political power of Islam diminished with the rise of nationalism, it largely remained as a strong social force in the Middle East. While several Muslim political leaders spent efforts to create secular state structures, they still relied on the power of Islam for many practical reasons. From the 1920s on, the Middle East states aimed to take Islam under state control. Islam was taken under control so that secular nationalism could be initiated smoothly. However, based on the political conditions after WWII, the place of Islam in the Middle East was reevaluated by almost every Islamic state so that it could be used to promote the national interests. State control of Islam could be achieved only if Islam was nationalized through state propaganda and public education systems. Throughout the Middle East several Muslim states initiated projects to nationalize Islam. In this paper, I propose that the Muslim states’ desire to use Islam for their political interests paved the way for the rise of political Islam. What were the conditions that forced the political leaders to appeal the socio-political power of Islam? How the projects to nationalize Islam were carried out in the Middle East? Along with answering these questions, I will conclude my paper by answering two crucial questions: Why did the nationalization of Islam fail? Did the failure of these projects cause further Islamization of the Middle East.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 240 words || 
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3. Gustavsson, Gina. "Who Needs National Identity? Personality Interacting with Nationalism, National Identity and Pride in Explaining Solidarity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241458_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Does national identity boost trust and solidarity? The results from previous research remain inconclusive. The main reason for this, it has been argued, is that different studies measure the effects of different types of national identities, and sometimes also on different types of solidarity. This paper, by contrast, directs the searchlight at a third and hitherto completely neglected nuance that might further help explain the contradictory results: the potential interaction between national identity and personality. In other words, I suggest that even when the type of national identity is held constant, its effect differs across individuals in predictable ways. The failure to bring personality into the picture, I argue, is furthermore related to a second gap in previous research that this paper seeks to remedy: its surprising lack of discussion of the individual level mechanisms that mediate the relationship between national identity and solidarity. The ultimate goal of this paper is to develop what we might call the psychological side of the theory of liberal nationalism, which holds that a strong national identity is crucial for maintaining support for the welfare state. The paper develops a set of novel hypotheses, about (1) the individual level mechanisms that would explain why national identity sometimes boosts cohesion, differentiating between sympathy, obligation, and trust; and (2) the interactions that we should expect between national identity and personality type. The hypotheses are tested with Dutch survey data from 2013-2014, using structural equation modelling.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 250 words || 
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4. Gustavsson, Gina. "National Identity, Trust, and Solidarity: The Effects of Nationalism, National Identity and Pride on Trust and Attitudes to Redistribution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241457_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the dimensionality of nationalism, national identity, and national pride outside of the American context; and their respective links to trust and egalitarianism. The theory section brings together two traditions that rarely speak to one another, despite asking similar questions. The first is the political theory literature on 'liberal nationalism', which defends a form of nationalism on the grounds that without a strong sense of national identity, citizens will not support income redistribution. This psychological claim, I argue, has not been tested in a satisfactory way, especially not in a European context. The second is the literature in political psychology showing the benign effects of national identity on political participation, attentiveness, and a number of other civic behaviors and attitudes – effects that only, however, are found when controlling for nationalism/uncritical patriotism (cf.Huddy & Khatib, 2007). This literature, by contrast, has not linked national identity to egalitarian attitudes specifically; also, although some of it has looked at strength of national identity, most of it has studied its salience. The paper addresses these research gaps by analyzing recent survey data from the Netherlands (LISS), as well as data from the US (GSS). The preliminary results suggest that, even when controlling for ideology, age etc., strength of national pride and national identity have a substantial positive effect on both interpersonal and institutional trust. Nationalism has the opposite effect, however. At the same time, national pride, but neither national identity nor nationalism, has a negative effect on support for economic redistribution.

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