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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6027 words || 
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1. Hendrickson, Ryan. "Potential NATO Partners – Political and Military Utility for NATO" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416855_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There are several countries that might be partner countries to NATO, but unlikely member countries, in the future. This category of countries includes for example Argentina, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Thailand. Argentina has, for exaple, contributed w

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6907 words || 
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2. Rafferty, Kirsten. "NATO's Partnerships and the Future of Security Cooperation in the NATO Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181282_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: NATO has seen numerous changes to its membership and its scope of operations since 1991, when the alliance first began to foster security partnerships with former Warsaw Pact adversaries. In particular, what began as a single partnership program, the Partnership for Peace, has expanded to include bilateral Partnerships with Russia and Ukraine as well as the Mediterranean Dialogue and the Istanbul Cooperation Initiative with states in the Middle East. However, simultaneous to the development of these partnerships, the alliance itself has experienced numerous stresses as allies have attempted to reconcile competing security interests. In this context, in which a strained NATO extends cooperation with an ever-larger cast of non-members, this paper attempts to evaluate the rationale for NATO?s partnership agreements. It develops an argument about the role of norms and interests in advancing security cooperation and then assesses the relative weight of the norms used to justify expanding partnerships with the real geostrategic interests of the NATO allies and their partners. The paper then draws theoretical and practical implications for the future of security cooperation in the NATO framework.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 40 words || 
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3. Haaland Matlary, Janne. "Potential NATO Members – Political and Military Utility for NATO" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416852_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In Eastern Europe, NATO has taken steps in addition to EAPC. The Individual Partnership Action Plan (IPAP) is such a step and was launched at the Prague Summit in 2002. Many of these countries (for example Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Georgia,

2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 261 words || 
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4. Hertkorn, Michaela. "“Out-of-Area in Afghanistan: NATO’s Mission and Afghanistan’s Future”, or “Doomed Together? NATO’s Stakes in Afghanistan and Central Asia”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439412_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper addresses questions relating to the overall strategic goal of the US and its NATO and European allies in Afghanistan. It explores what the current US American ‘Af-Pak’ policy, incepted by President Obama in 2009, has meant for the US, its allies and the region of Central and South East Asia.

The US decision to send more civilian and military troops to Afghanistan raises a number of questions with implications for international security and regional stability. How will the shift in US foreign and security policy from a counter-terrorism strategy towards a counter-insurgency strategy, which emphasizes the protection of civilians, further impact how Afghans perceive the US mission and the involvement of the international community in Afghanistan? Does this shift in policy in effect come eight years too late?

US allies, such as European partners in NATO are wrestling with demands for their own troop surges. In Berlin and other European capitals governments have struggled with how to best sell the continued Afghanistan war-effort, which exceeds a UN peacekeeping mission, to its war-weary populations. In May 2010, Germany's former President resigned over remarks that Germany needed to support NATO efforts in Afghanistan because of its own trade interests in Central Asia.

We will addresses some of the post-war challenges, which the people of Afghanistan face as a nation and in the region.


Some of the thoughts in this paper have flown into a newly created grad course on NATO in Afghanistan, which I will offer and teach at the New School for General Studies in the fall 2010 semester.

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