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Showing 1 through 5 of 44 records.
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2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 7054 words || 
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1. Kelle, Alexander. "Multilateral Arms Control as a Response to NBC Proliferation - A New Transatlantic Divide?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70874_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The chapter assesses the US and European approaches to multilateral arms control as a response to the NBC proliferation problem. To this end it compares US and European policies and their underlying reasoning in the issue areas of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons arms control. After identifying conceptually differing approaches to arms control - normativist and utilitarian - one section each is devoted to reviewing the three issue areas of NBC arms control and the US and European performance in these areas. The chapter concludes by placing the findings from these three areas of multilateral arms control in the wider context of US and European arms control and security thinking, in order to answer the question whether we are facing a new and deep transatlantic divide over multilateral NBC arms control as a response to proliferation.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 30 pages || Words: 9201 words || 
Info
2. Bratslavsky, Lauren. "Television representing television: How NBC’s 30 Rock parodies and satirizes the culture industry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p272712_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Television sitcoms offer a wealth of representations of culture. Of interest is the representation of the workplace, specifically, working in the television industry. An important component to television comedy as well as representation are two humor devices—satire and parody. Using the culture industry, the circuit of culture framework, and humor techniques, this paper analyzes the NBC sitcom, 30 Rock, for its representation of the television industry, the production of culture, and the culture of production.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8292 words || 
Info
3. Johnson, Robin. "State sponsored cyborgs: Gender, technology and immaterial labor in NBC’s 'Bionic Woman' and 'Chuck'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p376286_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes two primetime television series on NBC: ‘Chuck’ and ‘Bionic Woman.’ The narratives and representations in the two programs raise questions about the role of immaterial labor, gender, technology, and bio-power in contemporary life. Multiple theoretical perspectives, including the political economy of post-industrialism, immaterial labor, and technofeminism, are engaged to reveal how each series articulates the dominance of techno-masculinity and reifies the unequal sexual division of labor around prized technological work. Although the programs are similar in reflecting the valorization of immaterial labor within narratives of technology encroaching on the boundaries of mind and body, the gender representations of the series’ characters demonstrate that the ideal worker and citizen is white, male, and heterosexual. What emerges from these cultural texts in terms of immaterial labor and technology-human relations is the ideology of competition and self-interest rather than cooperation and collective action. Ultimately this labor is performed in the service of the United States’ war on terror.

2011 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 7563 words || 
Info
4. Craig, Rogers. "NBC, the USDA, and Radio's National Farm and Home Hour: 1930s Commercialization and the Challenge to Public Service Programming" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 09, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482188_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the Depression years of the 1930s, millions of American radio listeners tuned in each noon hour to hear The National Farm and Home Hour with its blend of live music, national news, and agricultural information. At its peak, the program aired nationwide over NBC's powerful Red network and reached a daily audience of 10 to 20 million listeners.
National Farm and Home Hour was a unique cooperative effort of NBC and the United States Department of Agriculture with the participation of dozens of other farm organizations. For much of its life, the program aired without commercial sponsorship, and when government regulators began to question the growing economic dominance of the big networks, NBC pointed to Farm and Home Hour as a prime example of its commitment to public over profit.
Yet as the radio industry matured, the growing demand for advertising time caused many of NBC's most powerful affiliates to abandon Farm and Home Hour in favor of local, commercially sponsored programs. This set off a three-way struggle between the USDA, NBC, and the affiliates to determine the program's future. In 1945, the daily broadcast ended and NBC reformulated the show into a 30-minute once-a-week sponsored program. This paper uses archival sources to document Farm and Home Hour's thirty-year history and examine the struggle to maintain its public service mission in the face of an increasingly commercialized radio industry.

2012 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 8553 words || 
Info
5. Poniatowski, Kelly. "“The nail polish underneath the hockey gloves”: NBC’s framing of women hockey players in the 2010 Winter Olympics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 15, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544910_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the ways women hockey players are framed via NBC’s commentary of the 2010 Olympic Games and better understand how the commentary serves to preserve and maintain gendered and national hegemonies to U.S. audiences. Using Nvivo software to conduct textual analysis of nine different U.S. and Canadian women’s games, two major themes of physicality and feminine constructions of female hockey players emerged. The women’s game was framed as inferior to the men’s game because women are not allowed to body check. The strength, speed, and size of the Canadian women framed them as more masculine while the U.S. players were framed as “fit but feminine” and the only worthy competitors to the Canadians. Women were also constructed as feminine for being married, having children, and wearing nail polish and pearls. Women were also framed as legitimate athletes for having previously participated in more masculine or gender neutral sports such as inline skating, soccer and softball. While not all of the findings are positive, some give hope that the image of women athletes is changing in the media.

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