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2010 - ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 248 words || 
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1. Maier, Jürgen. and Faas, Thorsten. "Needs and Debates. The Moderating Impact of “Need to Evaluate” and “Need for Cognition” on Perceptions and Effects of Televised Debates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, Jul 07, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419908_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Candidates in televised debates have (at least) three subsequent goals: They want to act convincingly during the course of the debate, they want to be seen as the winner of the debate afterwards and they ultimately want to benefit from their debate appearance on Election Day. Depending on voters’ personality, these are conflicting goals. To demonstrate this we add the concepts of “need to evaluate” and “need for cognition” to the study of campaigns. Viewers with strong needs should be more attentive and evaluative during the course of the campaign (hypothesis 1). Moreover, judging the overall outcome of the debate afterwards should be easier for them and also be more closely linked to the performance of the debate contenders (hypothesis 2). However, this judgment is less likely to spill over to their overall evaluations of the candidates and their voting intentions, as they are likely to have strong pre-debate attitudes that are hard to alter (hypothesis 3). We use data from a panel study conducted in the context of a televised debate that took place in the 2009 German Election campaign. The panel survey comprised questions covering attitudes towards the candidates and voting intentions (pre- and post-debate waves), perceptions of the debate performance of the candidates as well as scales for need to evaluate and need for cognition (post-debate only). In addition, 300 of our respondents were asked to provide real-time judgments of the candidates during the course of the debate, which allows us to test hypothesis 1.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 246 words || 
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2. Chaudhuri, Nandita. "Prioritizing Healthcare Needs for Women, Infants and Children in Texas: Innovative Multi-Method Needs Assessment Design" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the mid-1930s, the Title V Federal-State partnership in the United States continues to provide a dynamic program to improve the health of all mothers and children of the nation, including children with special health care needs. Every 5 years, each Title V agency is required to develop their own framework and process to conduct and submit a formal assessment of their state or territory’s maternal and child health needs. In 2010, the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University was contracted by the Texas Department of State Health Services to develop and implement an innovative methodological approach to come up with a prioritized list of maternal and child health needs for Texas. We discuss the nuances of the multi-method needs assessment design that drove the process along with the benefits and shortcomings of each. We analyze the various stages of design implementation: stakeholder engagement in the 50 community listening sessions in strategic Texas locations, two web-based validation and prioritization surveys as a direct follow-up from the sessions, a two-day stakeholder summit held in Austin and eight public forums in the health service regional headquarters. In the larger comparative context of various maternal and child health needs assessment designs implemented by other states, this paper addresses why and how this Texas-based multi-method participatory approach with its various nuanced components serves as a promising innovative program model for maximizing stakeholder input and policy prescriptions in identifying and prioritizing the maternal and child health needs in Texas.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 196 words || 
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3. Gehring, Krista. "Racial Differences in Pretrial Needs: An Examination of the Hamilton County Inventory of Need Pretrial Screening Tool" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p576440_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Admissions into the criminal justice system in the past several decades have presented unique sets of challenges for pretrial service agencies. Some defendants may find themselves in the criminal justice system due to needs that are better served by other human service agencies. Therefore, it is possible that identifying needs at the pretrial stage and connecting individuals to appropriate community services could divert many individuals from the criminal justice system and prevent their continual “cycling” through the system. Very little is known about the needs of pretrial defendants or their effects on pretrial outcomes. Assessment tools for identifying these needs are in short supply. Therefore, even though there are current programs and practices that intend to divert individuals from the criminal justice system, there is a possibility that pretrial agencies are missing opportunities to gather information that will aid in the identification and diversion of even more pretrial defendants from the system. This research examines a needs assessment instrument used by the Hamilton County, Ohio Pretrial and Community Transition Services. The purpose of the current study is to investigate racial differences in the needs of pretrial defendants and whether these needs are related to pretrial outcomes.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Rose-Jacobs, Ruth., Black, Maureen., Coleman, Sharon., Ettinger de Cuba, Stephanie., Casey, Patrick., Cook, John., Cutts, Diana. and Frank, Deborah. "Basic Needs Disparities in Low-Income Households with Young Children with and without Special Health Care Needs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p954982_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) may be particularly vulnerable to early environmental stresses (Shonkoff, 2000). CSHCN are at risk for chronic physical, developmental, behavioral emotional conditions, often requiring special services (McPherson, 1998). Families of CSHCN may experience stress associated with parental employment constraints, medical/educational expenses and time required for caregiving. Thus, low-income households with CSHCN may be burdened with material hardships, such as food insecurity, inability to afford enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members (Bickel, 2000).

CSHCN meeting high disability/ low household income criteria may receive Supplemental Social Security (SSI), intended to partially offset household financial burdens. There is limited evidence regarding relationships between young CSHCN within low-income households and food insecurity and whether this relationship is mitigated by children’s SSI receipt.

We tested two hypotheses: 1) low-income households with CSHCN have higher risk of food insecurity than low-income households without CHSCN, and 2), households with CSHCN not receiving child SSI are at higher risk of food insecurity than households without CSHCN or households with CSHCN receiving child SSI. Support for the first hypothesis would demonstrate the vulnerability of households with CSHCN to food insecurity. Support for the second hypothesis would suggest that SSI may diminish the likelihood of food insecurity associated with raising CSHCN.

Families were recruited from 5 urban medical centers (Baltimore, MD; Minneapolis, MN; Boston, MA; Little Rock, AR; Philadelphia, PA) serving low-income populations. Primary caregivers of eligible dyads [index child under age 4; caregiver fluent in English, Spanish, (in MN) Somali] whose children were not critically ill were interviewed privately in pediatric emergency departments and clinics. Interviews included: socio-demographics., 5-question standardized Children with Special Health Care Screener (Bethell, 2002), 18-question U.S. Department of Agriculture Household Food Security Scale. Dyads with children’s private insurance were excluded. Bivariate analyses identified potential confounders to be entered in logistic regression models of household food insecurity.

Table 1 shows sample characteristics (n=2029 no CSHCN; n=377 with CSHCN no SSI; n=92 CSHCN with SSI). 18.8% of sample households had CSHCN, including 3.7% receiving SSI. Children receiving SSI were more likely to have been hospitalized (75.8% vs 58.0%, p=0.002) and in fair/poor health (45.1% vs 22.8%, p =0.001) compared with CSHCN not receiving SSI. Preliminary multivariable logistic regression models (Table 2) (covariates: study site, mother’s place of birth, ethnicity, marital and employment status, education; child age; gender, number of children in household) identify 1) 28% greater odds of food insecurity in households with versus without CSHCN; and 2) compared to households without CSHCN, the odds of food insecurity are 31% greater in households with CSHCN but without SSI, but not significantly greater for households with CSHCN with SSI. Although power is constrained by current sample size, data collection is ongoing.

Preliminary findings within low-income households indicate that young CSHCN are at greater risk for food insecurity, particularly those not receiving child SSI. These analyses support the need for more proactive food insecurity screening/referral to families receiving health and developmental services for CSHCN.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 252 words || 
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5. Martin, Alison., Gallarde, Sheryl. and Hartzell, Marilyn. "Access to Services and Supports for Families with a Child with a Special Health Care Need: Results from Oregon’s Title V Needs Assessment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1000499_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As of 2011-2012, 19% of Oregon’s children had a special health care need (National Survey of Children’s Health. NSCH 2011/12). Children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) are “those who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who require health and related services of a type or amount beyond those required by children generally” (McPherson et al., 1998). Twenty-five percent of Oregon parents of CYSHCN reported feeling stress from parenting in the past month compared to 7% of non-CYSHCN parents (NSCH 2011/12). The types of support families of CYSHCN need thus expand to include those that support their child’s health condition. We will share results from Oregon’s Title V Block Grant needs assessment specifically focused on the CYSHCN population ages birth to 11 years. The needs assessment sought to understand the current needs of Oregon CYSHCN and their families and the system(s) capacity to address those needs. We collected data from 4 stakeholder groups, including 544 families of CYSHCN via self-report surveys. Comparisons between families who reported being able to access needed services and supports and families who were not able will be made using key variables such as child age, type of insurance, and geography. Quantitative, self-report survey results will be supplemented with qualitative results obtained through a stakeholder panel and discussion sessions. We will conclude the presentation with a discussion of how these results were used to inform the selection of Oregon’s Title V Block Grant priorities for CYSHCN.

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