Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,338 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 268 - Next  Jump:
2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7961 words || 
Info
1. Kim, Su Jung., Wang, Rebecca. and Malthouse, Edward. "How Negative is Negative Word-of-Mouth? The Effects of Posting and Viewing Online Negative Word-of-Mouth on Purchase Behaviors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p715097_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous studies on the effects of word-of-mouth (WOM) have rarely distinguished the effect of creating and reading WOM messages. This paper investigates how posting and viewing online negative word-of-mouth (NWOM) affect customers’ subsequent purchase behaviors. We also identify different types of negative emotions expressed in NWOM and examine their impact. Using a dataset that combines customers’ posting and viewing activities on the firm’s online forum and their purchase and redemption histories, we find the interaction effect between posting and redeeming to be positive, and viewing to be negative. Regarding emotions, anger has a negative effect, while concern has a positive effect. We propose an explanation for these findings, and discuss their implications and applications.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5258 words || 
Info
2. Stambough, Stephen. "Going Negative: Candidate Gender, Negative Messages, and Surrogate Messengers in 2006 Campaign E-mails" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210556_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, we examine over 300 campaign emails sent by campaigns during the 2006 elections. We find that female candidates are more likely to engage in negative campaigning, but are also more likely to use male or gender neutral surrogates to deliver these negative campaign messages.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 13244 words || 
Info
3. Beukeboom, Camiel., Finkenauer, Catrin., Wigboldus, Daniel. and Burgers, Christian. "The Negation Bias: When Negations Signal Stereotypic Expectancies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 21, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399862_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on linguistic biases shows that stereotypic expectancies are implicitly reflected in language and thereby subtly communicated to message recipients. We examined whether these findings extend to the use of negations. We hypothesized that people use more negations in descriptions of stereotypically inconsistent behavior, compared to stereotypically consistent behavior. Three studies in which participants either judged the applicability of controlled sentences or spontaneously produced person descriptions, provided support for this hypothesis. Moreover, Study 4 demonstrated the communicative consequences of a biased use of negations. When a person’s behavior was described with negations (e.g., not smart), message recipients inferred that the behavior was an exception to the rule, and that it was more likely caused by situational circumstances than by dispositional factors. These findings indicate that stereotypic expectancies are implicitly transmitted through a biased use of negations, and that negations play a subtle but powerful role in stereotype maintenance.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Song, Hyunjin., Nyhuis, Dominic. and Boomgaarden, Hajo G.. "A Network Model of Negative Campaigning: Structures and Determinants of Negative Campaigning in Multiparty Systems" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1103286_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recently, there has been a growing scholarly attention to the nature and extent of negative campaigning in non-majoritarian multi-party systems. While these studies have made commendable progress in outlining the conditions and consequences of negative campaigning, they have typically disregarded the complex interdependencies of multi-actor communication environments. To rectify this shortcoming, the present paper focuses on network-structural determinants of the negative campaigning behaviors. We examine patterns of candidate communication during the 2013 Austrian federal election, relying on an extensive manual coding of the mediated campaign communication. Employing Exponential Random Graph Models to investigate the targets of negative campaigning and the individual incentives to partake in such communication behavior, we find that – above and beyond common determinants of negative campaigning outlined in previous literature – indicators of network structure are important predictors of campaign communication. This suggests that network models are crucial for accurately representing patterns of communication in multi-party systems.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 268 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy