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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7356 words || 
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1. Jones, Charles. and Shen, Jing. "Neighborhood Social Capital, Neighborhood Disadvantage and Change of Neighborhood as Predictors of School Readiness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411231_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study shows how economic and social capital aspects of neighborhoods have separate impacts on children’s school readiness. Measures of social capital are derived from aggregated judgments of neighborhood collective efficacy while economic advantage/disadvantage is measured by census variables from neighborhood and community profiles from census subdivisions and census tracts. These neighborhood-level variables are merged with nationally representative data from a prospective longitudinal study of children (National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth) in order to explore how neighborhood-level characteristics influence children’s school readiness. Findings show that economic and social capital characteristics of neighborhoods each have significant impacts on children’s vocabulary-related test performance but that such neighborhood effects seem not to be involved in other cognitive dimensions of children’s school readiness, namely, those abilities that are less related to vocabulary-dependent tests, such as copying, symbol manipulation and mathematics. Balanced randomized replication (BRR) estimations and bootstrap weights are adopted, in order to adjust for stratification and clustering in the sample design and also incorporate a post-stratification element to correct for biases resulting from longitudinal-data attrition.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 170 words || 
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2. Holland-Davis, Lisa. "Investigating Neighborhood Social Ties, Neighborhood Cohesion, and Collective Efficacy in a Suburban Neighborhood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1032504_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study focuses on resident social ties, neighborhood cohesion, and collective efficacy within a suburban neighborhood. Data for this study, collected as part of an evaluation of a neighborhood revitalization initiative, consist of crime data, in-depth interviews with neighborhood residents and police, and observations at community events. Baseline survey data reveals that 72% of residents are at least somewhat satisfied with their neighborhood and 43% of residents report that the best thing about their neighborhood is their neighbors. While the target neighborhood borders a high-crime area, police have noted a decline in crime within its boundaries over the past five years. Residents and police alike attribute much of this decline to a proactive neighborhood association which has worked to foster better resident-police communication resulting in a proactive response to neighborhood problems. There is, however, evidence that the social ties and cohesion fostered by the neighborhood association are concentrated in only a small area of the neighborhood resulting in an uneven ability to mobilize police within the neighborhood.

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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3. Perry, Danielle. "“My Neighborhood Ain’t Never Done Nothing for Me”: Using Photo Elicitation to Understanding How Inner City Youth Identify with Their Neighborhoods" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p990549_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black youth residing in urban neighborhoods face various disadvantages due to high rates of poverty. The consequences of living in continuous economic crisis include decreased neighborhood resources, which risks their academic, social, and psychological wellness. Utilizing an ethnographic qualitative approach, this study explores the relationship ten 7th-12th graders from a Midwestern city develop with their neighborhoods. Over a four-week process, participants were provided with disposal cameras, and were responsible for taking pictures within their neighborhoods, journaling their experiences, and participating in two focus group interviews. Findings suggest that while participants acknowledge the negative characteristics (i.e. violence, crime, decreased educational opportunity, etc.) that exist within their neighborhoods, they do not allow these negative factors to limit their aspirations for successful life outcomes. This demonstrates that while neighborhoods may play a role in perceived opportunities for these teenagers, there are ways to navigate these structures to promote the well-being of these youth.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Rarick, Jason., Finegood, Eric. and Blair, Clancy. "How soon do neighborhoods matter? Investigating longitudinal associations between neighborhood disadvantage and early child stress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959852_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Child development occurs in context, with several levels interacting with one another and with the child (Bronfenbrenner & Morris, 2006). Within this, the neighborhood context is proving to be an important factor for the wellbeing of family and child above and beyond individual-level variables. For instance, studies have shown that indicators of disadvantage measured at the neighborhood level, such as crime, unemployment, and poverty, are associated with mental, behavioral and health outcomes for youth and adolescents, net of individual levels of poverty (Brooks-Gunn, et al. 1997; Leventhal et al., 2000).
Another line of research supports stress as a possible mechanism for understanding how these relationships work (Hackman, et al., 2012; Evans, 2006). Research shows that chronic exposure to neighborhood stress in particular is associated with higher cortisol levels in adolescents (Hackman et al., 2012) and a flatter rate of cortisol decline over the day in adults (Karb et al., 2012), which are associated with lower outcomes for several key developmental domains. These biomarkers are common among indices of allostatic load, or the ‘wear and tear’ on the body associated with prolonged exposure to stress (McEwen, 2000). While the emerging research on the effects of neighborhood disadvantage suggest that neighborhoods contribute uniquely to shaping the HPA axis in adolescents and adults, very little is known about the emergence of this relationship, that is, how early the relationship between neighborhood disadvantage and cortisol can be detected.
To this end, the current analysis used growth curve analyses to investigate longitudinal associations between neighborhood disadvantage and basal cortisol levels through infancy and toddlerhood (from ages 7 months to 24 months), net of a vector of covariates and a composite index of cumulative risk that included several indicators of household socioeconomic status. The current paper used data from the Family Life Project (N = 1,292), a longitudinal study of families in low-income and rural communities in the US (Vernon-Feagans et al., 2013). In addition to replicating other relationships found in the literature, we found that a composite indicator of neighborhood disadvantage generated from census block group data interacted with child age to predict cortisol levels (b= -.128, p < .01). Specifically, neighborhood disadvantage was associated with higher basal salivary cortisol levels at later time points (24 months) but not earlier time points (7 months) in a model adjusted for sensitive parenting, mother cortisol, race, and household cumulative risk (See Table 1; interaction graphed in Figure 1). Interestingly, there was no main effect for neighborhood poverty across the first two years, suggesting that the effect of cumulative neighborhood disadvantage emerges over the first two years of a child’s life.
To our knowledge, this represents the first study of its kind to link neighborhood-level factors of disadvantage with levels of cortisol in very young children. Detecting significant associations this early in child development is an important first step and could have powerful implications for the value of understanding stress as well as interventions targeting high-risk neighborhood contexts. Such implications and future directions will be discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Legette, Kamilah. and Crosby, Danielle. "Influences of Neighborhood Racial and Class Composition on the Neighborhood Experiences and Future Orientation of Black Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961293_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The neighborhood is an especially important context for youth development because it may help shape how adolescents see themselves and think about their prospects for the future. Research has found that the neighborhood context is associated with school readiness and achievement, behavioral and emotional functioning, and sexuality and childbearing in Black youth (Brooks-Gunn, Duncan, Klebanov, & Sealand, 1993; Duncan & Raudenbush, 2001; Leventhal & Brooks-Gunn, 2000). However, research examining Black youth has predominately focused on those who are economically disadvantaged and living in neighborhoods with minimal supportive resources, low employment opportunities, inadequate housing, insufficient schools, and higher rates of neighborhood crime and drug trafficking (Aber, Bennett, Conley, & Li, 1997; Anderson, 1999). As such, these studies conflate the effects of race and class on youth outcomes and presents a relatively narrow view of the experiences of Black youth. According to a recent SRCD social policy report on minority children (Cabrera, 2013), research is needed that disentangles race and socio-economic status when examining the developmental experiences and outcomes of youth of color. Such work can help deepen our understanding of within- and between- group variation in the developmental processes and contextual influences that impact youth outcomes.
The purpose of the current study is to understand how the racial and economic composition of neighborhoods operate distinctly (and in combination with one another) to influence the neighborhood experiences (racial discrimination and feelings of fear) and future orientation of Black youth. Using data from the longitudinal cohort study of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN), we explore the linkages between neighborhood racial and economic composition and the neighborhood experiences and future orientation of Black adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 (N=265). A series of multiple regression analyses were conducted, which controlled for parent education, child age and gender, and verbal skills. In terms of neighborhood experiences, we find that neighborhood racial composition predicts adolescents’ reports of discrimination and concerns about neighborhood fear, while neighborhood economic composition predicts only the latter. Black youth living in majority Black neighborhoods reported less discrimination, but greater fear concerns than those living in majority non-Black neighborhoods. In addition, Black youth in low-income neighborhoods had more fear concerns than those in higher-income neighborhoods. In terms of adolescents’ hopes and beliefs about the future, Black youth living in higher-income neighborhoods reported higher educational aspirations and expectations than those living in low-income neighborhoods. However, we also find evidence of an interactive effect such that the association between neighborhood SES and adolescents’ aspirations varied by neighborhood racial composition. For Black youth living in Black majority neighborhoods, neighborhood SES was positively associated with educational aspirations; whereas, the opposite was true for Black youth living in non-Black majority neighborhoods. For Black youth living in non-Black neighborhoods, aspirations were higher in lower- versus higher- income neighborhoods; in fact, the lowest aspirations reported in the sample were from Black youth living in high-income non-Black neighborhoods. The paper will also discuss possible mediators and policy implications.

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