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Showing 1 through 5 of 425 records.
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2009 - International Communication Association Words: 133 words || 
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1. d'Haenens, Leen. and Bardoel, Johannes. "The Netherlands: Being Present Wherever the Public Is: Public Service Broadcasters’ Role on Digital Platforms. Recent Evidence from the Netherlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298121_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In the Netherlands, public broadcasting has taken the lead with its comprehensive digital strategy, containing an extensive Internet presence and a bouquet of seventeen thematic channels and thus leaving behind the main commercial competitors that are much more conservative in this respect. However, the success of the Internet also has a downside. In contrast with radio and television, higher reach via Internet signifies higher costs, hampering further development within the existing financial and legal frames. The question is how the public broadcaster can evolve from a transmission to a communication model, and whether these digital initiatives comply with the public value test and the market impact assessment the EU Commission plans to adopt in its efforts to make the public service broadcasting remit and funding both transparent and proportional to the services rendered.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 4931 words || 
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2. Konig, Ruben., Rebers, Hans. and Westerik, Henk. "Television Omnivores? Snob and Slob Taste for Television Programs in the Netherlands in 2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90817_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Bourdieu (1979/1984) argued that people demarcate societal boundaries through a lifestyle that exhibits their cultural taste. Peterson and Simkus (1992) amended Bourdieu's theory using the concepts of cultural omnivores and univores. Research on omnivorousness and univorousness has typically focused on musical tastes. Our research extends this field to tastes for television programs using data from a survey among a stratified probability sample of the adult Dutch population (n=825). Through correspondence analysis, we showed that people from higher status groups and with larger amounts of cultural capital watch less program types than implied by Peterson and Simkus' (1992) amendment. Preferences with respect to television program types are compliant with Bourdieu's (1979/1984) original theory on the distinctive force of taste expressions.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 13 pages || Words: 6471 words || 
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3. de Haan, Jos. "Mind the Gap: Trends in Use of Information Media in the Netherlands, 1975-2005" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172016_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The central questions of this paper are: (1) to what extent has the growth of Internet use gone hand in hand with a decline in the use of print and broadcast media in the Netherlands?; and more specifically (2) to what extent has the Internet been adopted by users as an information medium? We first of all discuss in some detail the methodology of the Time Use Survey (§ 2). A description is then provided of the diffusion of the pc and Internet in the Netherlands (§ 3) and of the time use of these new media (§ 4). In the next paragraph (§ 5) the relationship between the use of new and old media (printed media, radio and television) is discussed. Subsequently the attention is focused on the use of media as a source of information and differences between educational groups with respect to the use of these sources (§ 6).

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 8840 words || 
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4. Earnest, David. "Political Incorporation and Historical Institutionalism: A Comparison of the Netherlands, Germany and Belgium" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69385_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The practice of enfranchising resident aliens lies at the heart of a theoretical debate among political scientists who study the institutions of sovereignty and citizenship. A number of such scholars cite this practice as evidence of an erosion of both the historical link between the nation and state and of the state's sovereign authority to define its political community. They argue that global norms of democracy and human rights, international governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and even international diplomacy cause states to offer the franchise to resident aliens. This is the transnational thesis. By contrast, other scholars argue that because these voting rights often are limited and discriminatory, they only reinforce the link between nation and state. They argue that states extend voting rights to resident aliens in the same way they earlier enfranchised women and minorities. They cite the importance of interest group politics, cultural understandings of citizenship, institutional venue (judiciary versus legislature), and partisan variables. This is the nationalist thesis. Despite the centrality of this debate to our understanding of sovereignty, citizenship and democracy, however, little is known about the conditions under which this democratic practice will emerge. This paper examines the political incorporation of aliens in three European democracies with widely varying experiences. The Netherlands extended the franchise to noncitizens in 1981 with little opposition; Germany's nascent experiment with noncitizen voting rights ended in 1990 when the Federal Constitutional Court ruled such rights in violation of the Basic Law; and over the last 30 years Belgium has frequently considered such rights but has never enacted them in the face of domestic opposition. Using these three cases, the paper finds considerable support for the nationalist thesis, citing the influence of partisan politics and historical institutional factors; it finds little support, however, for the international and normative factors emphasized by the transnational thesis.

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