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2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Bui, Bonnie. "Reciprocal relationship between social network characteristics and depressive symptoms among older adults in the United States: Differentiating between network structure and network function" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/VND.OPENXMLFORMATS-OFFICEDOCUMENT.WORDPROCESSINGML.DOCUMENT>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1515093_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social networks and social support can influence older adults’ depressive symptoms, but depressive symptoms can also influence network maintenance. This study investigates this dynamic, examining whether networks impact future depressive symptoms, and whether depressive symptoms matters for future network characteristics. Methods: Data are from Waves 1 (2005-2006) and 2 (2010-2011) of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), a longitudinal study on health and social factors of older adults. Results: Using lagged dependent variable models, evidence of reciprocal associations between social support and depressive symptoms were found, as well as social support and the number of close ties and frequency of contact, placing social support in an important position between depressive symptoms and select network structure variables. No clear reciprocal associations between social network structure and depressive symptoms were found, although density was associated with later depressive symptoms, and depressive symptoms was associated with later number of close ties. Discussion: The relationship between network structure and depressive symptoms operates largely through social support. Network structure is meaningful in that it provides the source from which support is derived to influence depressive symptoms.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 5691 words || 
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2. Johansen, Morgen. and LeRoux, Kelly. "Non-Profit Networking Effectiveness: The Impact of Networking Frequency and the Nature of Network Relationships in Non-Profit Organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544018_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A key area of study for public management and nonprofit scholars is networking effectiveness. Nonprofits have encountered increased pressures to improve organizational effectiveness in recent years, both from their funding entities as well as the public, yet no studies to date have considered the effects that managerial networking have on nonprofit organizational effectiveness. This paper tests for the first time Meier and O’Toole’s model of public management and networking in the context of the nonprofit sector. We focus on the effect of a common measure of networking, frequency of contact, on nonprofit effectiveness. We examine nonprofit directors’ networking with a variety of political and community institutions, and we also consider the nature of these networking relationships in order to answer the question of whether networking effects nonprofit organizational effectiveness.
This study draws on survey data from a random sample of 315 nonprofit human service organizations in sixteen U.S. states. Relying on self-reported measures of networking from nonprofit Executive Directors, we test an empirical model in which we look at the frequency and the conflictual or cooperative nature of various networking relationships on achieving the organization’s core mission, increasing the organization’s funding, making strategic decisions, raising awareness, meeting funders’ expectations, responding to clients, and influencing the policy agenda. Findings suggest that the frequency and nature of networking relationships influences networking effectiveness. The results are discussed within the nonprofit and public management networking literatures and offer insights for both theory and practice.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6301 words || 
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3. Yun, Sun-Jin., Ku, Dowan. and Han, Jin-yi. "Climate Change Policy Networks in South Korea: Growth Network and Environmental Network" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper conducted a policy network analysis using a questionnaire survey to examine how major policy actors in Korea establish alliances and engage in conflicts in regards to four major policy issues. The questions raised in this study include: 1) Who are major actors in climate policy decision-making in Korea?; 2) How are climate policy networks shaped?; and, 3) What are the drivers of alliance network formation and conflicts between networks? This study came to the following conclusions. First, governmental organizations are the main actors in the general climate policy arena that mediate between the business and civil sector, and key organizations in each sector play a leading role to form and maintain inner alliance networks. Second, there are two divided and contesting alliance networks: the growth network and the environmental network. The growth network is stronger and more intense than the environmental network, except in regards to nuclear power policy. Third, scientific discourse and a consensus on the advent of anthropogenic climate change by international scientific communities, international climate negotiations and pressure commit to GHG emissions reduction, and domestic political leadership, have been crucial drivers for proactive policy discourse in Korea.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8864 words || 
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4. Mizruchi, Mark., Neuman, Eric. and Marquis, Christopher. "Does Network Structure Affect the Size of the Network Effect? The Role of Density in the Network Autocorrelation Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21400_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Researchers interested in the effects of social network ties on behavior are increasingly turning to network autocorrelation models, which allow for the simultaneous computation of individual-level and network-level effects. In this paper we examine the extent to which the effects of network ties are contingent on the structure, in particular the density, of the network of which they are a part. There are reasons to believe that the size of the network effect will be independent of density, but there are also reasons to believe that there might be a systematic association between the two. We use computer simulations on randomly generated networks at various levels of density and with three different types of endogenous variables to examine whether an association exists between density and the size of the network effect. We find that the effect is either stable or slightly negative from low density levels up to a density of about .85. At densities above this point, the size of the network effect begins to sharply decline. We examine several alternative conditions to test for the robustness of this effect. There is some indication that the association between density and the network effect is curvilinear—strongly negative at both very low and very high levels of density and closer to zero at intermediate levels.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 10006 words || 
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5. Danowski, James., Riopelle, Ken., Gluesing, Julia., Blow, Scott., Ferencz, Mark., Hallway, Fred., Henry, Mark. and McClain, Shawn. "Communication Networks and Productivity: Rewiring Low Productivity Units' Networks to Match High Productivity Units' Networks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p228778_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper reviews the literature on relationships of communication as well as communication network structures with organizational productivity. An hypothesis that flows from the literature is that higher network density is associated with higher productivity. We investigated associations between communication network structures and productivity in four vehicle assembly plants. Network analysis of communication about industrial materials use revealed that valued network density had an R2 of .97 with IM cost per unit produced. The highest productivity plants had IM network members communicating weekly or more often. We performed a triad census in each plant that also identified triad members so that we could propose a network rewiring intervention for three plants to change their networks to be similar to the highest productivity plant. The rewiring strategy is accurate, tractable, and reproducible.

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