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2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 102 words || 
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1. Carboni, Julia. and Lemaire, Robin. "Revisiting the Whole Network Literature: Network Level Research Versus Whole Networks as Systems of Organizing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1037386_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One key network concept is “whole networks” (Provan, et al. 2007). However, it is not clear how much progress has been made in understanding whole networks. This may be attributed to lack of conceptual clarity on “whole networks”. Building on Provan et al., we clarify the concept and review the literature on “whole networks”. We discuss the cumulative knowledge on network structure, evolution, governance, and outcomes, as well as the future directions necessary to further our understanding of this complex approach to organizing. We emphasize implications for multi-sector governance arrangements and the role of nonprofits in those arrangements.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8864 words || 
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2. Mizruchi, Mark., Neuman, Eric. and Marquis, Christopher. "Does Network Structure Affect the Size of the Network Effect? The Role of Density in the Network Autocorrelation Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21400_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Researchers interested in the effects of social network ties on behavior are increasingly turning to network autocorrelation models, which allow for the simultaneous computation of individual-level and network-level effects. In this paper we examine the extent to which the effects of network ties are contingent on the structure, in particular the density, of the network of which they are a part. There are reasons to believe that the size of the network effect will be independent of density, but there are also reasons to believe that there might be a systematic association between the two. We use computer simulations on randomly generated networks at various levels of density and with three different types of endogenous variables to examine whether an association exists between density and the size of the network effect. We find that the effect is either stable or slightly negative from low density levels up to a density of about .85. At densities above this point, the size of the network effect begins to sharply decline. We examine several alternative conditions to test for the robustness of this effect. There is some indication that the association between density and the network effect is curvilinear—strongly negative at both very low and very high levels of density and closer to zero at intermediate levels.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6301 words || 
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3. Yun, Sun-Jin., Ku, Dowan. and Han, Jin-yi. "Climate Change Policy Networks in South Korea: Growth Network and Environmental Network" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 10, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649314_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper conducted a policy network analysis using a questionnaire survey to examine how major policy actors in Korea establish alliances and engage in conflicts in regards to four major policy issues. The questions raised in this study include: 1) Who are major actors in climate policy decision-making in Korea?; 2) How are climate policy networks shaped?; and, 3) What are the drivers of alliance network formation and conflicts between networks? This study came to the following conclusions. First, governmental organizations are the main actors in the general climate policy arena that mediate between the business and civil sector, and key organizations in each sector play a leading role to form and maintain inner alliance networks. Second, there are two divided and contesting alliance networks: the growth network and the environmental network. The growth network is stronger and more intense than the environmental network, except in regards to nuclear power policy. Third, scientific discourse and a consensus on the advent of anthropogenic climate change by international scientific communities, international climate negotiations and pressure commit to GHG emissions reduction, and domestic political leadership, have been crucial drivers for proactive policy discourse in Korea.

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