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2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5990 words || 
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1. Forgette, Richard. and Morris, Jonathan. "Ideologically Extreme Political News and the News Grazer: Does Ideological News Reduce the Mediating Effects of Public Discourse?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research assesses the effects of ideological political news on television viewers. It is grounded in a theory of “news grazing” suggesting that viewing public gather less political news, at intermittent intervals, and often in a distracted state. We first report survey data indicating that news grazers now constitute approximately 60 percent of the American public, and this number appears to be increasing. Compared to news consumers of the past, the majority of today’s TV news watchers are less apt to watch news they consider uninteresting. In order to adapt to this trend in a fragmented news environment, many television news providers created news products that are more entertaining and compelling than the more standard traditional media. We then report results from an experiment assessing the behavioral effects of ideological news, one network adaptation to the news grazing trend. Our experiment assesses the impact of ideologically charged programs like the O’Reilly Factor on viewers’ perceptions of political opposition. Notably, does ideological news promote ideological stereotyping, a perception of wider and more conflicting differences between ideological classes. Our experimental results offer little evidence of an ideological stereotyping effect, but we do find that exposure to this type of news promotes a larger perceived ideological gap between political elites.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 5708 words || 
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2. Knobloch, Silvia., Sundar, S. Shyam. and Hastall, Matthias. "Clicking News: Impacts of Newsworthiness, Source Credibility, and Timeliness as Online News Features on News Consumption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13311_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Impacts of journalistic values, reflected in online news features, on readers' news selections were investigated. In a web-based field experiment, 366 German and American participants browsed through online news. The displayed articles were associated with different levels of newsworthiness (number of topic-related articles), credibility (sources' credibility established in a pretest), and recency (time span since report's upload). While newsworthiness perceptions did not increase with number of related articles in linear fashion, perceived high newsworthiness resulted in longer news exposure times. A complex interaction revealed that impacts of credibility on news consumption depended on cultural setting and frequency of online news reading. Recency only influenced American news readers.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8936 words || 
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3. Jeong, Yongick. and Lee, Sun Young. "A Study on the News Values of International Disasters: Change of Determinants on News Coverage of International Disasters in the U.S. News Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405268_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the relationship between the various factors of a country and the news coverage of international disasters in the U.S. media. Media coverage of international disasters was assessed by the number of news stories reported in 12 representative news media. The results indicated that the degree of damage of the disaster—the extent of the death toll and economic loss—were consistently significant factors during the four-week period; economic and political indicators emerged as significant predictors from the second week onward. Furthermore, the relative strength of effects of predictors varied across each time period.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 8056 words || 
Info
4. YANG, Guang. and GUO, STEVE. "The Impact of News Text, News Frames and Individual Schemata on News Comprehension" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582373_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explicates the news comprehension construct by examining three of its key components: news memory, news knowledge, and news understanding. We treat them as conceptually distinct but operationally related entities and trace their antecedents to framing devices in news texts. Three experiments were conducted. Results show that education, rather than narrative structure of news texts, played an important role in influencing news memory. The generic and issue-specific news frames together with individual schemata affected how audiences interpreted, stored and recalled news stories.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 7276 words || 
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5. Burkey, Brant. "Millennials at the Back Gates: How Young Adults’ Digital News Practices Present a New Media Logic for News Gathering and Gatekeeping as User-Oriented Activities in a Participatory News Ecosystem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1280006_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The participatory nature of the contemporary news ecosystem makes it increasingly important to examine how digital news users are active participants in selecting, authenticating, contextualizing, and distributing digital news content, redefining our understanding of news gathering and gatekeeping as being user-oriented activities in this digital order. This qualitative study provides insight into the motivations, perceptions, and attitudes of millennials regarding their digital news practices, while highlighting their roles as distributive news gatherers and reciprocal gatekeepers.

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