Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 6,986 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1398 - Next  Jump:
2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 6323 words || 
Info
1. Yu, Jason J.. and Aikat, Debashis. "News on the Web: Agenda Setting of Online News in Web Sites of Major Newspaper, Television and Online News Services" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p15225_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examined the influence of communication technology on agenda setting by comparing the media agenda of newspapers, television, and online media. The media agenda data were identified by the issue salience in these media. The results of the study indicate a significant difference of issue hierarchy among these media.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8871 words || 
Info
2. Lehman-Wilzig, Sam. and Seletzky, Michal. "Hard News, Soft News, General News: The Necessity and Utility of an Intermediate Classification" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p230194_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: For at least the past three decades journalism scholars have focused on two types of news – soft and hard – without reassessing these categories or adding to them. The present article investigates whether such neglect is warranted, through a questionnaire and in-depth interviews with 32 journalists and editors from the three main Israeli dailies: Yediot Ahronot, Maariv, Haaretz. The findings argue strongly for a third, intermediate category of news – 'general news' – as well as for a more rigorous and comprehensive definition of 'hard' news and 'soft' news that are here supplied. These three news categories were then tested on 465 news items of the above dailies which led to the categorization of a new newspaper type, lying somewhere between the elite and populist press. Methodological and substantive ramifications of this addition are discussed.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7785 words || 
Info
3. Dutton, William., Blank, Grant. and Newman, Nic. "News, Online News and the Fifth Estate: Developing Patterns of News Production and Consumption in Britain" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490372_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This paper looks at how the production and consumption of news is changing in the UK. Survey evidence shows a step-jump in the use of online news as a complement to print news reading, but also the increased role of search and social networks in leading people to the news. Institutionally the paper argues that these patterns underscore recent changes in news media, such as their greater reliance on the Internet. Individually we see the empowerment of networked individuals of a Fifth Estate who have achieved a growing independence from the Fourth Estate as more information moves online and individuals become routinely linked to the Internet.

2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7540 words || 
Info
4. Cheng, Ka Lun Benjamin. and Lo, Wai Han. "Who says news can’t be imaginative? A quasi-experiment testing perceived credibility of animated news, news organization, media use and dependency." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p519058_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Animated news is a news reporting technique emerging in Hong Kong, Taiwan and mainland China. Online news media using such technique has yielded very considerable size of viewership to their news videos. Animated news is a format of using digital animation to reenact the detail course of a news event as part of a news report. Often times animated news video mixes the facts gathered by journalists with their own imaginations to fill missing links of an event. A quasi-experiment with 153 college students as participants was done to compare the perceived credibility of news using and without using animation. Results showed that participants indicated sound effects of animated news would reduce its credibility. Perceived news credibility was also found related to its news organization and medium dependency. Implications to animated news media and future research direction in animated news were discussed.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8076 words || 
Info
5. Domingo, David., Masip, Pere. and Costera Meijer, Irene. "Tracing Digital News Networks: Towards an Integrated Framework of the Dynamics of News Production, News Circulation, and User Practices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p712786_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Research on the evolution of journalism is still lacking a specific and comprehensive theoretical framework to (re)conceptualize the blurring boundaries between news production in a professional and institutional context and various journalism practices like citizen journalism, advocacy journalism or participatory journalism and their various users, audiences or publics. If digital journalism scholars and practitioners want a better understanding of the triangulation of production processes with users’ experiences, preferences and judgments, they might be in need of new questions and thus new methods. First, it demands a reconsideration of the difference between information and news. Second, the issue when does who or what count as a journalism producer or as a user? Is a quick glance sufficient and at what? Where do the non-human algorithms of data mining technology fit in? And third, investigating journalism-oriented practices calls into question what users and what producers are doing in relation to journalism or news. Some of the key terms of journalism studies like informed citizenship or democracy might not even be relevant in these contexts. Fourth, when news production and news use are seen as cultural practices, it also seems important to understand how they order, control, organize or anchor other practices.

This paper proposes a theoretical framework for studying digital news practices that avoids a priori definitions of particular technological or human roles in the processes of production, circulation and use of news. It also revisits the empirical findings of research on online journalism and digital publics in order to reinterpret them from an integrated theoretical approach inspired by actor-network theory. Focusing on practices allows researchers to problematize journalism as an institution and its normative definitions as network arrangements that are challenged, reinforced or reassembled through everyday interactions between professional journalists, other social organisations, digital technologies and the public.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1398 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy