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2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 25 pages || Words: 14753 words || 
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1. Horner, William. "The First Saturday Night: Saturday Night Live and Gerald Ford" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p363823_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I offer an examination of original White House documents regarding the appearance of White House press secretary Ron Nessen as the guest host of Saturday Night Live in April, 1976; detail the impact of Saturday Night Live's treatment of the Ford Presidency on the campaign of 1976; and investigate the reasons for Saturday Night Live's producers' and writers' decision to treat Ford as they did. The paper includes an experimental study to measure the impact of Saturday Night Live's debate sketches on audience perceptions of the candidates' perfomances in the real 1976 debates, which were the first televised debates since 1960.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 109 words || 
Info
2. Silvares, Lavinia. ""He cals her soule of the Night": Chapman's Glosses in The Shadow of Night" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p525068_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Assuming the gloss as an exposition and scrutiny of the places of poetic invention, Chapman puts himself in the position of both producer and annotator of his text, defining a particular legibility for the poem. Considering the sixteenth-century glossarial practice as an emulation of the scholium tradition of "opening-up" the "difficulties" of a text, this paper discusses, the implications of Chapman's glosses for the poem's immediate reception, the importance of authorized role models (Servius, Macrobius, Cornutus) for the glossarial practice, and the idea that a text does not possess a congenital clearness of its own, but can only be understood through the continuous process of a specific glossarial assessment.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. O'Keeffe, Zachary. "The Late Night Bump: Evidence of Information Search About Political Guests After Late Night TV Appearances" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350453_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using Wikipedia page views and Google trends, I find that political actors enjoy hundreds to thousands-fold increases in Internet searches immediately after late-night TV interviews, demonstrating the power of soft news to spur interest in politics.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 10427 words || 
Info
4. Feldman, Lauren. and Young, Danna. "Late-Night Comedy as a Gateway to Traditional News: An Analysis of Time Trends in News Attention among Late-Night Comedy Viewers during the 2004 Presidential Primaries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152480_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: This paper challenges the assumption, advanced in recent survey data published by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, that young audiences are abandoning traditional news as a source of election information in favor of late-night comedy programs. Instead, we offer evidence, consistent with Baum’s “gateway” hypothesis (2003), that exposure to late-night comedy increases attention paid to the presidential campaign in national network and cable news. Insofar as campaign news provides the context for the political jokes featured in late-night comedy monologues, late-night television appears to serve a socializing function, such that it motivates viewers to pay more focused attention to the campaign in hard news sources—perhaps so that they feel better equipped to enjoy the comedy. This analysis uses data collected via the National Annenberg Election Survey (NAES) during the 2004 presidential primary season, between October 30, 2003 and June 4, 2004. As hypothesized, cross-sectional results demonstrate that viewers of late-night comedy pay more attention to the campaign in national and network cable news than non-viewers, controlling for a variety of factors. Time series analysis also reveals that the rate of increase in hard news attention over the course of the primary season is greater for viewers of late-night comedy than for non-viewers.

2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 152 words || 
Info
5. Long, Mary Beth. ""Yes indeed the night you mention was the very night I died & I've beene dead ever since": Sanctifying Death at the Benedictine Convent at Cambrai" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper concerns the "book of the dead" of Our Lady of Consolation at Cambrai, France (Archives Départementales du Nord MS 20H7), a catalog of nuns who died between 1631 and 1654, including Lucy Cary and Gertrude More. I argue that the narratives adhere to the structural parameters of the medieval saints' lives the nuns read for edification, suggesting that hagiography continued to offer moral and textual models for post-Reformation nuns. This is especially clear in the catalog's equivalent of a martyr's conversion experience (the nun's entry into the convent) and martyrdom (the nun's deathbed behavior). The focus on the stability of the known and generic — the choice to join the convent and the conventionally-patterned deathbed behavior — is to the near-exclusion of the instability of the unknown and individual: the life before the convent, the life after death, and, perhaps most worrisome to readers, the individual experience of death itself.

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