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2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 654 words || 
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1. Shavard, Galina. and Grechko, Andrey. "Epistemic cultures in multidisciplinary non-formal educational settings. A case study of network-based non-institutional and non-commercial summer school in Russia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p990154_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores non-formal network-based educational practice through the theoretical concepts of epistemic cultures and social reproduction in education.

Formal education is a one of the most rigid and conservative social domains with long-standing hierarchies and multiple layers of bureaucracy. While in the 90s Russia saw a significant leap towards democratization and experimentation in education, recent reforms follow an increasingly neoliberal agenda that inoculates the culture of uniformity, ratings and economic efficiency. These factors among others largely contribute to the shaping of epistemic cultures in universities as rather static, vertically-aligned and conformist. This refers to how knowledge is acquired, produced, validated and shared.

At the same time, much of non-formal education follows a counter pattern and gravitates towards more networked communication, more diversity and interaction. This refers to how both organizational and epistemic cultures develop. In this study a particular focus is given to the ‘hidden curriculum’, i.e. the mechanics of knowledge construction, its social settings and conditions rather than formal ‘hardware’ curriculum recorded in study plans and books. The case study is the Summer School project which in the last 10 years has become a standalone phenomenon in education in Russia.

The central research questions of the study are: 1.What characterizes meta-epistemic cultures in multi-disciplinary non-formal educational settings? 2. What conditions enable such meta-epistemic cultures to develop? 3.How do such epistemic cultures impact immediate and long-term educational outcomes(as perceived by participants themselves)?

The case under study is an annual summer school project that is organized by a wide network of entrepreneurs, researchers, journalists, NGOs activists, teachers and other professionals as a fundamentally networked, non-institutional, non-governmental and non-commercial educational practice. The School is held for 4 weeks in summer on the grounds of a camping site 150km away from Moscow; it is fully self-reliant in terms of provision of amenities. It hosts 1500 participants (most staying for 2 weeks) aged 15 to 70 of very different occupations, status and from all parts of the country). The School is built around 30 thematic studios that range from robototronics, theoretical physics and medical science to photojournalism, pedagogy and behavioral economics. These studios are studied not as a constellation of self-contained entities, but as highly interconnected communities of practice embedded in respective expert cultures, but all together representing a distinct meta-epistemic culture.

The case study follows a predominantly qualitative approach relying on multiple sources of data collected through the field work: a survey (202 participants) with a blend of closed and open-ended questions that investigates two vectors of interest: the way participants describe educational practices at the School and the way participants see its immediate outcomes and long term impacts (one survey was held a week after the School and the second is planned for January’15); 20 in-depth interviews with scientific coordinators (those who largely shape epistemic culture) and 30 observations of various educational practices at School. These methodological instruments combined will provide an insight into the specific features of multidisciplinary epistemic cultures in non-formal settings and its educational outcomes as perceived by participants themselves.

The study builds upon the theory of social reproduction in education and the concept of epistemic cultures. Surprisingly little research has so far focused on epistemic cultures in schools and higher educational institutions and almost nothing is known about epistemic cultures found in the domain of non-formal education. This study seeks to fill this knowledge gap. Based on the previous studies of epistemic cultures, we look at the following elements of epistemic culture: mechanisms of selection of study/research material, choice of methods, communication among members, system of awards and sanctions, evaluation, physical environment and space organization.
By looking at the epistemic culture in the sample case of non-formal educational practice, this study addresses pressing questions of how epistemic cultures work in non-formal education, what principles guide their cognitive and procedural orientations, and whether their conditions, structures and operations can be extended to other forms of educational practice, particularly to formal education.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 33 pages || Words: 13530 words || 
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2. Ogilvie-White, Tanya. "The Non-Proliferation Diplomacy of the Non-Nuclear-Weapon States: Understanding International Responses to Iran's Nuclear Defiance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181410_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores the responses of the non-nuclear-weapon states (NNWS) to Iran’s violation of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), focusing on the stance adopted by members of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In February 2006, key NAM members voted to refer Iran to the UN Security Council in a move that stunned Iranian diplomats, and seemed to signal a collapse in NAM solidarity on fundamental non-proliferation issues. This paper assesses the significance of this event, analyzing the extent to which it represents a softening in the ideological divide between NAM and Western approaches to third-party non-compliance, and a convergence in attitudes towards the nuclear non-proliferation regime more generally. It draws on the interlinking concepts of international system, international society and global society to help explain these developments, exploring the hurdles and opportunities associated with any attempt to build on the fragile consensus emerging among the NNWS over the need to respond more decisively to NPT violations.

2017 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Gilzene, Alounso. "Non-Profits as a Proxy for Non-Instructional Capacity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, Nov 13, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1289696_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When schools do not have adequate access to counselors and other non-instructional staff members, school leaders must find ways to build capacity at a low cost. In scenarios where schools need added capacity, “school-supporting non-profits” (Nelson & Gazley, 2014) step in. Several of these organizations provide resources in the form “volunteers” who influence the school environment, often acting as a proxy for the services provided by non-instructional staff.

2013 - The Law and Society Association Words: 297 words || 
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4. Cross, Jason. "Latin American Politics & the Global Governance of Intellectual Property (IP): How Local Non-IP Agendas Drive Global IP Reform that Circles Back to Advance Local Non-IP Agendas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, MA, May 30, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646480_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Electoral shifts toward leftist parties and policies in Latin America in the 2000s have had significant impacts in diplomatic negotiations concerning global economic governance. One area in which the new Latin American lefts have had an impact is in the governance of intellectual property (IP) concerning trade, health, education, the environment and indigenous knowledge. Diplomats, social movement advocates, and commercial lobbyists from Latin America have led coalitions contesting the commodification of knowledge-practices in trade treaties and organizations, while advancing alternative regimes governing access to knowledge that promote more open approaches to the circulation of knowledge in greater tune with human rights. This global movement has inspired domestic movements advocating for access to knowledge (A2K) policies within Latin American states that provide concrete alternatives to the dominant formula of rule by commodification. These alternatives then help advance the mobilization of broader political movements organizing for alternative economic policy by way of providing concrete proposals and sites of struggle through which to imagine other worlds of possibility. This paper draws from ethnographic research and legal advocacy on intellectual property and access to medicines in international negotiations and a healthcare reform movement in El Salvador. The analysis shows how domestic political shifts toward the left in Latin America enabled realignment in international diplomacy concerning intellectual property, and how that realignment then supported the development of A2K movements within Latin American states – focusing on the case of access to medicines in El Salvador. Understanding this process requires more than an analysis of interests, but exploration of the role of political subjectivity and imagination. For the international and domestic movements described entail the construction of novel frames for grappling with the politics of the global knowledge economy and the development of alternative discourses, institutions and strategies to those of economic orthodoxy.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 250 words || 
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5. Isla, Nicolas. "Learning Arms Control Lessons: Biological Weapon (BW) Non-Proliferation and the Role of Non State Actors (NSA)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Progress in BW non-proliferation has been slow since the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention came into force in 1975. Since 2001, when States Parties failed to agree upon the Verification Protocol, which would have effectively solved many of the Convention’s shortcomings, there has been difficulty in seeing eye to eye on several important issues. Throughout this period state actors occupied the central position in policy formation. Civil society, industry and international organizations and have made only marginal contributions. This article maintains that the integration of NSAs is necessary, among other reasons, because they are increasingly undertaking relevant dual-use activities (public/private research institutions) and are therefore most subject to BW control policy. Furthermore, the state-centred approach has simply failed to produce a convincingly effective treaty. Recently cooperations have emerged indicating a trend towards a pluralistic (or transnational) arrangement. For example, in 2006 the EU contracted the BioWeapons Prevention Project to implement two actions plans. The instrumentalization of civil society in the biological area is a sign of greater NSA involvement but its success is yet to be analysed. Nevertheless, to infer that BW non-proliferation policy is heading towards the transnational state without a concerted effort is inaccurate. This article will examine areas of arms control where the diversity of actors involved in policy formation is broader: the Mine Ban Treaty, the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the Non-Proliferation Treaty. With this study, we aim to learn from the contributions of NSAs in these areas in order to move biological arms control forwards.

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