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2007 - SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY Words: 250 words || 
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1. Schaible, Glenn., Kim, C. S.., Breneman, Vince. and Bucholtz, Shawn. "Working-Lands Conservation in U.S. Corn Production: Evidence on Program Participants and Non-Participants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Saddlebrook Resort, Tampa, Florida, Jul 21, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p174139_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: USDA’s conservation programs have placed greater emphasis on working-land conservation, primarily through the EQIP and CSP programs. Our hypothesis is that the environmental performance of U.S. agriculture is affected by many factors other than conservation program incentives. Good land stewardship and its environmental benefits often make good business sense even without program participation. To better understand the relationships between farmer motivations, program incentives, and the environmental benefits of conservation programs, USDA initiated the pilot national survey integration program, the Conservation Effects Assessment Project -- Agricultural Resources Management Survey (CEAP-ARMS). CEAP-ARMS integrates Natural Resource Inventory (NRI) data on field-level physical characteristics and CEAP production practice and program participation information with ARMS cost-of-production, operator, farm household and resource/economic data. CEAP-ARMS was completed in 2004 for wheat (882 farms, 16 States) and in 2005 for corn (489 farms, 4 States). This study used the CEAP-ARMS corn data for 2005 to first compare key operator, field, farm, economic, and environmental characteristics of conservation program participants with non-participants. We then estimate cost-function based technology adoption models of producer decisions regarding the allocation of field-level acres between corn production and infield and perimeter-field conservation structures, examine how these decisions differ between program participants and non-participants, while accounting for differences in other field, farm, and environmental factors. Evidence indicates that non-program factors heavily influence producer conservation practice decisions, that farm-size matters, and that program non-participants emphasize adoption of infield conservation structures while program participants emphasize adoption of perimeter-field structures.

2008 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: 2 pages || Words: 908 words || 
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2. Faircloth, Susan. and Hibel, Jacob. "A comparison of the academic outcomes of American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start participants and non-participants as reported in the Kindergarten Cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa, Orlando, Florida, Oct 30, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p274617_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Data from the kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study were analyzed to compare the academic outcomes of American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start participants and non-participants. Findings indicate that Head Start participants scored lower in reading and math than did their peers. They were also more likely to receive special education services. Implications for future research and practice in improving the academic achievement of AI/AN students will be discussed.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 14108 words || 
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3. Roberts, Timmons. and Parks, Bradley. "Is Kyoto Suffering From a Wider Disease? Explaining Participation and Non-Participation in the Kyoto Protocol and Other Major Environmental Treaties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100883_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper we develop a sequenced theory of the environmental treaty ratification behavior of nation-states, linking proximal causal explanations of institutionalism, constructivism and realism with historical and structural insights from world-systems theory. We test this theory an index of participation by 192 states in 16 environmental treaties through April, 1999 and three scales for participation in the Kyoto Protocol. There are four main findings. Numbers of NGOs in a nation positively influences participation in environmental treaties overall, but much less so nations’ ratification or non-ratification of the Kyoto Protocol. Kaufmann et al.’s (2003) voice and accountability index is a better predictor of Kyoto behavior than overall patterns on environmental treaties. Third, and very significantly, our new index of the share of environmental foreign assistance received by a nation is among the best predictors of participation in the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, structural dependency of nations on one or relatively few export products directly and indirectly explained nearly sixty percent of the treaty ratification rates overall and a third of Kyoto ratification behavior. This suggests that the spread of institutions and values may not create a world with more adherents to environmental treaties. We may, in fact, be approaching an upper limit in the number of countries that will cooperate on international environmental issues since their willingness and ability to participate may be structurally constrained. On the other hand, if we embed greater development assistance and wealth redistribution mechanisms within environmental treaties, there may be greater interest from those on the bottom. We have apparently uncovered an important part of the structural roots of the civil society strength and democratic institutions that drive participation in international environmental regimes.
Supporting Publications:
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Supporting Document
Supporting Document

2015 - ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference Words: 91 words || 
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4. Wu, Zhongsheng. "Does Non-political Participation Affect Political Participation? Evidence from a National Survey in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA’s 44th Annual Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1037103_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In general, civic engagement includes two types of participation:political and non-political. Previous studies on civic engagement mainly focus on political participation and few attention has been paid to attention to citizens’ engagement in non-political activities. Although much research have examined the relationship between non-political participation and political participation, whether individuals’ non-political actions affect their political behaviors is still in debate. Using a dataset from a national representative survey in China, this study examines if urban citizens’ non-political participation has any positive impact on their political involvement in the context of China.

2014 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 1264 words || 
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5. Dent, Kelly. "Open Thy Mouth: The Impact of Religious Participation on the Political Participation of black Americans in the Non-Metropolitan South, A Case Study of Hunt County, Texas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, The Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 09, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p698790_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents an abbreviated case study of the impact of religious participation on the political participation of black Americans who live outside metropolitan areas in the South by making use of a survey administered to congregants at historically black churches in Commerce, Texas. The paper begins with a brief foray into the lack of research concerning black Americans outside the metropolitan areas and the North. It discusses the role that the black church has played, both in the past and today, in the daily lives of the nation’s black residents. It then discusses religious participation and political participation, and explains the development of the customized survey administered to participants. After a focus on the seven black churches that were surveyed, and a brief description of the historically segregated community in which they are located, the paper discusses the survey results, along with their implication in the wider body of scholarship. This forms a part of a thesis for a degree that will be obtained in May 2014.

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