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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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1. Park, David. "Transnational Vectors and Intellectual History: A History of Non-U.S. Students in U.S. Communication Graduate Programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p980105_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Many histories of communication study take national formations (schools, intellectual traditions, research institutions) as a presumed starting point. To no small extent, histories of communication study have focused on purely North American, British, or Western European contexts. That these studies neglect the Global South and other regions in the world is obvious. Less obvious is how such work neglects transnational flows in communication study. This paper explores an important transnational theme in the history of communication study: the graduate education of non-US students at US graduate programs of communication. This is accomplished first by choosing a diverse group of US graduate programs with strong records of international admissions. I have chosen to study six such graduate departments of communication: Annenberg/Penn, the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, Stanford University, Michigan State University, and the University of Texas. After establishing the institutional histories of these departments as a backdrop, my data derive from a questionnaire administered to faculty at these departments, and to non-US students who pursued their degrees at these schools. Of basic importance were such issues as: geographic origins of non-US students, topics of dissertations, identities of advisors, post-graduate career tendencies, and trends within and across all of these variables. The result is a sweeping-yet-detailed understanding of one of the most important transnational flows we find in communication study: the movement of students to graduate schools and beyond.

2009 - 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 102 words || 
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2. Ro, Hyun Kyoung. and McIntosh, Kadian. "Societal and global awareness of non-U.S. citizen students in engineering majors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 22, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303189_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Accreditation agencies have summoned higher education faculty and leaders to promote learning outcomes such as societal and global awareness. Furthermore, research continues to promote the benefits of structural diversity. This study merges these topics by analyzing the curricular and co-curricular experiences of Non-U.S. citizen students on global awareness as well as examines how structural diversity explains both individual level and program level variances of student experiences and global competency. Data is utilized from the Engineering Change study using HLM procedures. Institutions can prioritize their resources when attempting to achieve societal and global awareness by focusing on programs such as study abroad experiences.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
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3. Williamson, Carrie. and Semisch, Courtney. "Supervised Release for Non-U.S. Citizen Federal Offenders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 16, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431402_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most federal offenders sentenced to a term of imprisonment are also sentenced to a term of post-incarceration supervised release. Among those not receiving a term of supervised release, the vast majority are non-citizens. The sentencing of non-U.S. citizen offenders has become a important issue in the federal courts because the proportion of non-citizen offenders has increased at a substantially greater rate than the increase in the overall caseload, 165 percent during the past decade compared to a 50 percent increase in the caseload overall. Non-citizens comprised 59.5 percent of all federal defendants in 2008.

While most offenders not receiving a term of supervised release are non-citizens, a substantial number of non-citizen offenders do receive a term of post-incarceration supervision, despite the fact that these offenders are generally deported after their terms of imprisonment and cannot be actively supervised in the community. Using data from the United States Sentencing Commission and the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, we compare non-citizen offenders for whom a term of supervised release was imposed to those for whom it was not. The analysis includes an evaluation of offense type, criminal history, sentence length, and judicial district.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 171 words || 
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4. McCarthy, Molly., Porter, Louise., Townsley, Michael. and Alpert, Geoffrey. "Community-level Drivers of Police use of Force: A Test of Minority Threat, Ecological Contamination and Social Disorganisation Theories in a Non-U.S. Policing Jurisdiction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277261_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on police use of force has examined the influence of a number of community characteristics on the use of force and excessive use of force within the U.S. policing context. Drivers of police use of force that have been most commonly examined to date at a community level include violent crime rates, concentrated disadvantage, racial heterogeneity and social disorganisation. However, little is known about how relevant these drivers of coercive police behaviour are outside of the U.S. policing context. The current study examines the distribution of police use of force across communities within a state-wide police agency in Australia, identifying community characteristics that are associated with higher frequency and severity of police use of force, and higher rates of disproportionate force. This study will examine support for minority threat theory, ecological contamination and social disorganisation as they apply to the distribution of police use of force across communities in Australia. Findings will be discussed with reference to the extant body of U.S. research and the unique policing context in Australia.

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