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2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 457 words || 
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1. Ryan, Krysti. "Parenting Outside the Gender Box: Raising the Gender-Nonconforming Child" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707520_index.html>
Publication Type: Research-in-progress presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explores the experiences of parents who are raising and supporting gender-nonconforming children as they negotiate social institutions that may be unsupportive of gender diversity. Using a sociology of family and care work perspective, I examine the ways in which the labor of parenting is uniquely exacerbated when caring for a child who does not adhere to the gender binary. This project is in the data collection phase.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8136 words || 
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2. Ryan, Krysti. "Parenting Outside the Gender Box: Raising the Gender-Nonconforming Child" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721962_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research project uses semi-structured in-depth interviews to explore the experiences of parents who are raising and supporting gender-nonconforming children as they navigate social institutions which may be unsupportive of gender diversity. Using a sociology of family and care work perspective, I examine the ways in which the labor of parenting is uniquely exacerbated when caring for a child who does not adhere to the gender binary. This study is currently in the data gathering phase of research development with preliminary results expected by Summer 2014.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Aults, Christopher., Pauletti, Rachel., Cooper, Patrick. and Perry, David. "Why Do Children Pick on Gender-Nonconforming Boys? A Longitudinal Test of Target-Specific Aggression." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p945505_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Children and adolescents who display cross-gender typed (CGT) behavior (e.g., playing with the opposite sex, acting like opposite sex) are often rejected and victimized by peers (Toomey et al., 2010). However, the cognitive characteristics of children who target CGT boys for aggression have been underexplored. Pauletti et al. (2014) found that preadolescents of both sexes who possess “self-discrepant gender identity”—who derogate and shun other-gender peers and activities yet question their fit with their own gender—increased their harassment of same-sex CGT peers over a school year. In the present study, we examined another type of self-discrepancy that might motivate preadolescents to harm CGT boys. Many preadolescents view physical attractiveness as extremely important to their self-worth; indeed, self-perceived physical attractiveness is among the strongest correlates of self-esteem (Harter, 2006). However, only some children who view physical attractiveness as important are able to achieve a strong sense of self-worth; some are unable to do so, and for them the gap between the high value they place on attractiveness and their low self-esteem may be a painful self-discrepancy. The pain and frustration associated with this self-discrepancy may cause them to experience a loss of self-regulatory control conducive to aggression (Higgins, 1987).

Thus, in the present study we investigated whether the value children place on physical attractiveness interacts with their global self-worth to affect their selective harassment of CGT boys. We hypothesized that children who view physical attractiveness as highly important for their gender yet have low overall self-worth would increase their selective victimization of CGT boys over a school year. Participants were 195 children (M age = 10.1 years; 94 girls) attending an ethnically mixed school. Measures were collected over the school year. Children reported the importance of being attractive, their global self-worth, and whether each classmate was or was not “mean to” every other classmate. Peers responded to a peer nomination inventory that assessed children’s CGT.

Hierarchical linear modeling was used to test the hypothesis. A within-child beta was computed for each child assessing the degree to which the child increased or decreased in aggression toward CGT boys (relative to other boys) over the year. These betas were then predicted from between-child variables (age, sex, importance ratings, self-esteem, trait aggression, and interactions). The three-way interaction of importance rating x self-esteem x sex was significant (B = -2.56, p < .001), and a subsequent analysis on each sex showed that the two-way interaction of importance rating x self-esteem was significant for boys (B = -1.15, p = .032) as well as for girls (B = 1.21, p = .018). The interactions are depicted in Figures 1 and 2 for boys and girls, respectively. The self-discrepancy hypothesis was clearly confirmed for boys, in that boys who placed high importance on physical attractiveness yet had low self-esteem increased their selective abuse of CGT boys the most. Girls with this self-discrepancy actually decreased their aggression toward CGT boys the most. Perhaps boys are more likely than girls to experience ego-threatening self-discrepancies as frustrating and angering.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Perone, Angela. "Compton's Cafeteria Riot: Collective Action and Transformational Empowerment among Hypermarginalized Gender Nonconforming Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119401_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During an August evening in 1966, a group of queer youth, drag queens, and transsexual hustlers rioted after police officers tried to eject a drag queen eating at Compton’s Cafeteria, an all-night diner in a poor inner-city neighborhood of San Francisco. In response, the drag queen threw coffee in the officer’s face, and a riot quickly ensued. Within a few months of this riot, the first affirming support services emerged by and for gender nonconforming people as an identity group.

By building on theoretical contributions from resource mobilization, collective identity, and collective empowerment, this paper seeks to understand how and why social change happens among hypermarginalized communities by focusing on a case study of the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot. Through extensive archival research and theoretical analysis, this paper seeks to answer the following questions: (1) How and why did a group of hypermarginalized individuals collectively mobilize for change despite numerous systems of oppression; and (2) How did this riot prompt the first affirming support services by and for gender nonconforming people as a collective group?

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Carathers, JaDee., Lubitow, Amy. and Kelly, Maura. "Transmobilities: Mobility, Harassment, and Violence Experienced by Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Public Transit Riders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1244732_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research endeavors to fill a conceptual gap in the social science literature on gender, public space, and urban mobilities by exploring how transgender and gender nonconforming individuals experience public transit. Although previous research has surveyed gender minorities about harassment and discrimination in a range of environments, we know little about the quality or content of these experiences. Drawing from 25 interviews with transgender and gender nonconforming individuals in Portland, Oregon, this paper finds that gender minorities experience frequent harassment while engaging with the public transit system. We therefore articulate the concept of transmobilites to define and describe the ways that transgender and gender nonconforming individuals experience a form of mobility that is altered, shaped, and informed by a broader cultural system that normalizes violence and harassment towards gender minorities. We conclude that gender minorities have unequal access to safe and accessible public transportation when harassment is widespread, normalized, and when policies prohibiting discrimination remain unenforced on urban public transit.

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