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2012 - BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL" Words: unavailable || 
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1. Macdonald Blakeley, Sean. "North East Asia, Security, North Korea, Nuclear Crisis, Coercive Diplomacy, comparative analysis US policy to North Korea during the 1993-4 and 2002-4 Nuclear Crisis Why did coercive diplomacy succeed in convincing North Korea not to leave the Nuclear Pr" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BISA-ISA JOINT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE "DIVERSITY IN THE DISCIPLINE: TENSION OR OPPORTUNITY IN RESPONDING TO GLOBAL", Old Town district of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Scotland UK, Jun 20, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p599148_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9149 words || 
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2. Manger, Mark. "Elbowing Your Way In ? North-North Competition in North-South FTAs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p99409_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An increasing number of developing countries engage in negotiations with industrialized nations over preferential trade and investment rules beyond WTO commitments. The resulting agreements are often highly asymmetrical in nature and designed to constrain host countries. At the same time, developed countries compete over access to emerging markets. How do these factors interact? Can developing countries increase their freedom to chose their own economic policies, or does the need to attract foreign capital eliminate all room for maneuvre? This paper analyzes the cases of the negotiations of the EU-Chile and US-Chile FTAs. It underscores the role of multinational corporations trying to influence bargains out of competitive concerns vis-à-vis other firms from the North. The key finding is that rather than providing a ?level playing field,? preferential trade and investment rules often directly reflect these firms? interests, and leave little regulatory competence with host country governments.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7343 words || 
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3. Nishida, Masayo. "Cosmopolitans in a Globalized World: North-to-North Highly Skilled Migrants and the Nation State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p240215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores the dynamics of international migration by highly skilled individuals from economically advanced societies. I argue that the accounts of these under-studied migrants command reconceptualization of the nation-state, one that acknowledges its shifting character and power in a globalized world. The analysis draws on in-depth interviews with 25 German and 25 Japanese professionals and white-collar workers in the Greater Boston area. Reflecting their high levels of human capital and “First World” origins, the experiences of these foreign-born professionals offer several unique patterns of adaptation. First, they encountered little discrimination and hostility in the workplace and other social arenas of American society. Second, they viewed professional and socioeconomic success as a process divorced from cultural assimilation into America. Third, they expressed considerable ambivalence of the possibility of acquiring U.S. citizenship. In short, these professionals identified themselves as “cosmopolitans” – individuals who are culturally autonomous from national collectivities and unconstrained by the legalities of state boundaries. At the same time, they relished the social and political privileges granted to members of powerful “First World” nations, and felt entitled to the legal right and protections offered by national governments, whether in the U.S. or in other parts of the world.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2007 - Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 377 words || 
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4. Smallwood, Arwin. "North Carolina's Forgotten Past: Indian Woods, North Carolina and the Merging of Indian, Black and White Peoples From 1584 to Present" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p207037_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: There has been very little scholarly work done on the intersection of the histories of Native Indians, African Americans and Europeans. What has been done has been done independently by scholars with fragmented emphasis on the individual histories of each group. No scholar has ever gathered together all the historical data from all sources and locations to write a comprehensive history of the historical interactions of all three groups. Nor has any scholar attempted what this work will do, which is to map over four hundred years of African-American history in one area, which will not only allow students to see the community evolve over the past 400 years, it will also give students and scholars the ability to interact with the maps and photographs. This paper, using historical atlases, maps and manuscripts (colonial records, diaries, and journals) will tell the story of Indian Woods, which is located in eastern North Carolina.
This is an important study for several reasons. First it will for the first time document the fragmentary history of these three groups in eastern North Carolina and how they interacted with one another. Which will give us a clearer understanding of what happened to Native Americans in the Northeastern and Southeastern Woodlands. Second, the project will also introduce new digital technology, which has the potential to allow students of all levels (K-12, undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars) to examine and interact with history. Finally, this study will is interdisciplinary endeavor involving the research of both the Historians and Archaeologist. Through maps, Native American sites such as villages, burial grounds, trading posts, ceremonial grounds and battle sites will be identified as well as how African slaves and maroons interacted with Native Americans within these spaces. As we explore and understand more about Indian Woods and the creolization that occurred there, we will begin to understand more about what it means to be both American and African American.
This study uses maps, photographs, oral interviews, and archival materials to complete a detailed community history that covers over 400 years of recorded history. This work will serve as a model for how local histories can be written and should offer new historical insights into the relationships between Indians, Blacks, and Whites and how those relationships impact America today.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 314 words || 
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5. "Taming the North Korean “Beast”: A US Foreign Policy of Discipline and Punish towards North Korea" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252776_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Most of the literature on US foreign policy towards North Korea is problem-solving oriented. It questions the different paths Washington should follow to put an end to North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic ambitions. However, these writings fail to problematize the prevailing representation of those ambitions as a significant threat to U.S. national security, as well as the ends of US policies. Drawing mainly upon the work of Michel Foucault and on the theoretical approaches in international political sociology that have integrated his writings (e.g. the “Paris School” and several poststructuralist authors in IR), this paper argues that US foreign policy towards North Korea seeks first and foremost to “discipline and punish” that country. In the first part of my paper, I take a look at the dominant narratives about North Korea in the policymaking and strategic circles, considering those narratives as fundamental conditions of possibility for foreign policy. Since the end of the Cold War there has been a growing number of narratives producing a North Korean subjectivity which is associated with the criminal figure in U.S. civil society. Indeed, Pyongyang has been identified as a “rogue” and “outlaw” subject that needs to be monitored, disciplined, if not tamed. Such an identity construction process has been consolidated over the years and has become North Korea’s hegemonic representation in the U.S. The outlawing/othering of North Korea in the US dominant strategic discourse has thus made it an outsider in the international community. As a result, such metanarrative has limited the scope of possible political and diplomatic relations with Pyongyang and has led to a foreign policy of taming and subservience. In the second part, I illustrate that many aspects of both the Clinton and W. Bush administrations’ foreign policies – such as economic sanctions, diplomatic talks, military exercises, and nuclear inspections – can be understood as dispositifs of a power relations’ praxis towards North Korea.

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