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Showing 1 through 5 of 17 records.
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2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7992 words || 
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1. Kenny, Christopher. "The Role of the NRA in House Elections: Endorsements, Members, and Turnout" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85852_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the ability of the National Rifle Association to affect turnout in House races in 1994, 1996, and 1998. We construct models of turnout in congressional elections that include NRA candidate endorsements and membership numbers.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 145 words || 
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2. Tucker, Justin., Sylvester, Steven. and Bright, Chelsie. "The Influence of Legislative Threats on Membership Levels in the NRA" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper seeks to understand how legislation, or the threat of legislation, affects interest group membership. While many scholars have studied the rationale behind interest group membership, few have sought to empirically test whether interest groups can use the threat of legislation to rally non-members to join their cause. In the case of gun legislation, the NRA attempts to shape legislation at the federal and state level and correspondingly attempts to persuade would be members to join their cause in their respective states as well at the national level. We estimate a Hierarchical Linear model of the most common proxy for NRA membership, American Rifleman magazine subscriptions, by state and in the aggregate (federal level) from the years 1981-2013 in order to test whether the threat of legislation in the state or at the federal level are correlated to increased membership numbers for the NRA.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 356 words || 
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3. Schnell, Frauke. and Callaghan, Karen. "Assessing the Influence of the NRA on Supreme Court Decision Making" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1128323_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While there is a lot of research on the NRA's influence on the legislative branch of government and its political campaign activities, we know substantially less about the extent to which judges are influenced by the group's lobbying power. This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the NRA’s level of efficacy in the judicial arena. Specifically, we analyze how the NRA influences Supreme Court justices’ decision making on gun rights and related issues. The Supreme Court serves as the key battleground for social policy issues. Its policy making role motivates the NRA to attempt to shape the Court’s legal and policy outputs by filing amicus curiae (“friends of the courts”) briefs—the preferred method of influence used by the NRA at the Supreme Court level. In order to analyze the group’s success in influencing court decisions, we examine all relevant Supreme Court cases between 1992 and the present. Our dependent measures are: 1) case outcomes which assess the NRA’s winning percentages and vote margins, and 2) attitudinal measures of the ideological slant of individual justices’ vote as well as choice certainty, measured by variance around the mean, to asses whether NRA briefs create uncertainty for the justices about the correct application of the law. The indirect effects of NRA amicus briefs on justices’ decision calculi are assessed using a content analysis of citation counts –i.e., the number of times the justices cite and are in agreement with NRA briefs in their opinions. Our findings indicate that NRA briefs play a significant role in shaping the justices’ decisions. Thus, the NRA has succeeded in challenging key aspects of national gun control laws at the Supreme Court level: its judicial power emboldened by the seminal Supreme Court Decision in 2008 that Americans have a fundamental right to keep guns in their homes. Furthermore, our results indicate that the NRA uses the Supreme Court strategically, adapting to the Court’s agenda as it goes along. The findings shed light on theories of interest group influence in judicial decisions. (This research is based on the forthcoming book: The National Rifle Association: Guns and Power in Interest Group Politics (Praeger Press)

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 10 pages || Words: 2869 words || 
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4. Horner, William. "Aiming at Two Targets: The NRA and its Fight for the First Amendment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85907_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is an examination of the NRA's recent freedom of speech agenda, aimed at both the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act and the Patriot Act.

2015 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 89 words || 
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5. callaghan, karen. "The Changing Public Image of the NRA" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 15, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p956116_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public opinion data suggest that today all major demographic and political groups hold more positive views of the NRA than they did a few decades ago. Why has this image changed? Using a variety of methods this paper shows how the NRA’s perceived legitimacy has been enhanced by the Supreme Court’s 2008 decision on Second Amendment Rights and how, in spite of recent violent events such as school shootings, changes in media structure and American culture have fostered a more positive public image of this special interest group.

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