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Showing 1 through 5 of 63 records.
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2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6341 words || 
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1. Kothari, Ammina. "When Rape Victims Become Symbolic Representations of War: A Textual Analysis of The NY Times Reporting on the Use of ‘Rape as Weapon of War’ in Darfu" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p271438_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines how journalists reported about rape victims in Darfur. The findings reveal how rape victims were reduced to symbolic representations of a conflict between Arab and Black Sudanese men. Furthermore, inclusion of graphic details about the acts of rape, reinforces the rape victims’ humiliation through public disclosure of their experiences.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7915 words || 
Info
2. St. John, Burton. "A View that's Fit to Print: NAM Propaganda and the NY Times, 1937-1939" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p375599_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the appearance of National Association of Manufacturers’ propaganda, from 1937 to 1939, in articles within the New York Times. NAM’s ability to place such rhetoric in the Times reveals both the presence of integration propaganda and the beginning of a press acclimation to propaganda as news. Such propaganda is now endemic. The press needs to move beyond privileged sources to seek out the wider range of voices that constitute our democratic discourse.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 267 words || 
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3. Hartman, Michelle. "“Assimilation vs. Accommodation - The NY Irish during the Civil War.”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273211_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It can be argued that many of the New York Irish immigrants who entered military service, during the Civil War, did so to pursue a variety of interests, and were not motivated mainly to become assimilated into the main-stream of American society, which was predominantly the white, Protestant, middle class. The theory that military service, during the Civil War, led to advancement for the New York Irish can be disputed, as it can be proven that those who joined the Union Army where not interested in necessarily proving their loyalty to America, but were interested in making America a place of safety for future Irish immigrants.

There are four main arguments that are put forth in this paper as to why many New York Irish joined the military on the side of the Union : that the Irish mainly joined the Union force for the pay they received during service, the Irish wanted to save the Union for future generations of Irish immigrants, to develop military skills that they would bring back to Ireland to help promulgate a revolution with Britain who was the occupier of Ireland at the time, and to prove as victims of nativist prejudice, the value of the Irish in the greater society in America. Anti-Irish and anti-Catholic prejudice was evident throughout the nineteenth century, showing that the New York Irish did not gain respect do to their participation in the military during the Civil War. Any advancement made in society was due to the Irish becoming politically active, their entering the Democratic Party, and their loyalty to the Catholic Church.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 13 pages || Words: 258 words || 
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4. Van Hooreweghe, Kristen. "Nature in the Apparently Mundane: An Exploration into Daily Life at McCarren Park, Brooklyn NY" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309438_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper discusses the importance of day to day life in a Brooklyn park for understanding urban residents relationship to nature. Utilizing ethnographic methods, this brief foray into daily life raises questions about the level of analysis commonly used when discussing environmental issues.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 30 pages || Words: 1743 words || 
Info
5. Van Hooreweghe, Kristen. "Nature, the City, and Everyday Life: An Investigation of Ecological Consciousness in Jamaica Bay, NY" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309352_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper explores the development of activists' ecological consciousness about New York City's Jamaica Bay and surrounding estuary. Using mixed methods, including an environmental history of Jamaica Bay, oral histories from activists, participant observation, and interviews, the paper explores the role of sensory experience in developing ecological consciousness and in shaping subsequent political activism.

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