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2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 16 pages || Words: 5085 words || 
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1. Prisock, Louis. "The Obama Conundrum: Black conservatives, colorblindness, and Barack Obama’s Presidential Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307753_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Senator Barack Obama's historic run for the White House has produced questions and speculation about whether Senator Obama's candidacy means that a new form of black politics, one that is not grounded in a civil rights history, has supplanted the traditional model. In addition there has also been speculation, among some African American conservatives, in particular, that an Obama presidency will signify an end to the impasse around the black-white racial dichotomy. In this paper I argue the following: Senator Obama's candidacy poses a dilemma for some African American conservatives pertaining to their racial beliefs. Through an examination of black conservative discourse about Senator Obama I show that their discussion of the racial significance of an Obama victory conflicts with their belief in the need for an adoption of "colorblindness." Secondly, I illustrate how senator Obama's popularity with African Americans highlights some of the limitations of black conservatism, particularly as a viable political option for African Americans. I argue that even though there are similarities between Obama and black conservatives, if Obama were a Republican, his support from African Americans would be significantly smaller due to the combination of various factors. For instance, the overwhelming perception among African Americans that the Republican party is a racist party and black conservatives inability to change the GOP's image due to their marginality within the party.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 267 words || 
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2. Scott, Anastacia. "The Obama Effect: Colorblind Media Representations of Barack Obama" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570881_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Post-Civil Rights, this same country witnessed its first viable African American candidate for president and it evoked age old racialized thought in public discourse. There was perception of the symbolic glass ceiling of African American achievement, possible continuation of the Civil Rights Movement and a push for African American reparations. Sen. Obama’s racial loyalty, racial disloyalty, qualifications, speech, inexperience, and the implications of his race and family was constantly scrutinized and analyzed.
Most of these inquiries stemmed from America’s racialized history and people’s emotional and political recollection of the past and its implications for this prospective president’s values and politics. One can say that since white males have used their power in politics to create a white race and benefit white people so well then there has to be some way that Sen. Barack Obama would do the same for members of his race. This suspicion can be attributed much to the fear held by white commentators and the media about his proximity to those veteran Civil Rights leaders. His image was framed by white racial thought as well as black racial thought but never for what he said he was.
Much of his image was framed by this colorblind notion of what the news media labeled “Post-Racial Politics”. The aforementioned idea falls under the political demand for colorblindness that calls for American citizens to move from an extremely high emphasis on race that produced very real political and social consequences in the early 20th century to the non-recognition of race that will continue to produce real life political and social consequences from the legacy of racialized inequalities.

2011 - ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5788 words || 
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3. Bonham, Matt. and Heradstveit, Daniel. "The “Collective Mind” of the Obama Administration: Figures of Speech and Central Concepts of Obama’s Approach to the Islamic World" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, Bilgi University, Istanbul, Turkey, Jul 09, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511229_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an earlier paper Bonham and Heradstveit (2010) analyzed rhetorical techniques and strategies, including metaphors, in President Obama’s speech at Cairo University on 4 June 2009, where he proposed a “new beginning.” Whereas Bush will be remembered for the skillful but misguided construction of a new way of seeing the world, Obama is seen as proposing through his references to the Holy Koran and “a new beginning” an attempt to empathize with the “other” and regain control over how the Muslim world sees the United States and the West. In this paper, we situate the analysis of Obama’s figures of speech in a larger context, one which is based on the cognitive map, not only of Obama himself, but of the social network involved in US foreign-policy decision-making, a map constructed from 50 persons and more than 350 texts, assembled as a “collective mind” of the Obama Administration. We will use this cognitive map to discover links between the figures of speech and the central concepts of Obama’s approach to the Islamic world.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 188 words || 
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4. Datta, Monti. "Anti-Americanism and Obama-Mania: Assessing the Impact of the Global Popularity of Barack Obama on U.S. Foreign Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p499585_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: To what extent does the global popularity of Barack Obama, i.e., "Obama-mania" matter for the U.S. national interest? In the 2009 APSA Task Force Report, "U.S. Standing in the World: Causes, Consequences, and the Future," Stephen Krasner and Henry Nau argue global popularity of the United States is of questionable importance in matters of U.S. foreign policy, and that "Obama has raised American esteem but has not produced more European troops in Afghanistan, secured concessions from North Korea, or made any headway with Iran." In this paper, I assess these claims. First, I examine the extent to which "Obama-mania" affects troop-contributions to the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, from the time of Obama's election in November 2008 to the present day. Second, using this same time period, I examine, how, if at all, "Obama-mania" has eased tensions and facilitated concessions with Iran and North Korea. I employ a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods in my analysis. The results of this study shed light on the extent to which global attitudes toward the United States matter in explaining interstate behavior toward a country as powerful as the United States.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 3 pages || Words: 1282 words || 
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5. Yecke, Cheri. "Is Michelle Obama our Marie Antoinette? Crane Brinton's Theory on Revolutions as Applied to the Obama Administration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p456153_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: First it was the Tea Parties, then the town hall meetings on health care reform. Some pundits have declared that these “tea baggers and town hallers” are inciting a revolution—but historical precedent suggests that the opposite is true: These Americans are opposing a revolution—the quasi-socialist revolution that has taken place under the Obama administration.

In historian Crane Brinton’s seminal work, The Anatomy of Revolution (1938), he retrospectively analyzed several historical revolutions, from the English wars of the 1640s to the French Revolution (1789) and Russian Revolution (1917), and discovered that they progress through a series of very similar stages. In times past, revolutions took years, even decades, to progress; however, in this age of telecommunication wonders, a revolutionary timeline is short and concentrated.

Examining the revolutionary stages identified by Brinton shows quite clearly that the actions of the Obama administration mirror those of other revolutionary regimes, and the “tea baggers” and “town hallers” of today are the counterrevolutionaries of times past.

Using Brinton’s work as a precedent, which side will ultimately triumph? Please join us to see the surprising answer.

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