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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 497 words || 
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1. Kampis, Dora. and Kovacs, Agnes Melinda. "Infants’ Representation of Others’ Beliefs Regarding Multiple Objects, Absence of Objects, and Objects That Ceased to Exist" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p956572_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Young infants’ understanding of others’ mental states has been documented extensively (Onishi & Baillargeon, 2005; Kovács, Téglás, & Endress, 2010, Buttelman, Carpenter, & Tomasello, 2009; Liszkowski, Carpenter, & Tomasello, 2008). However, the complexity of infants’ Theory of Mind (ToM) competencies is subject of debate. In two studies we address potential limitations of infants’ representations involved in ToM reasoning. First, we tested whether infants can track beliefs involving multiple objects, or beliefs about the absence of an object. Second, we investigated whether infants can ascribe beliefs that refer to objects that no longer exist.

In the majority of ToM tasks, infants have to track someone’s belief about the location of one object. While recent studies (Wang & Leslie, 2013) found that infants can deal with multiple beliefs ascribed to different agents, it is an open question how infants handle one agent’s beliefs referring to multiple objects. Relatedly, it has been suggested that infants’ ToM abilities involve representations that should show difficulties with handling certain types of contents, such as numerosity of objects (Butterfill & Apperly, 2013). In a manual search paradigm (Feigenson & Carey, 2005) we tested whether 14-month-old infants can compute others’ beliefs that involve multiple objects. First the infant and a person witnessed 2 objects (Study 1) or 1 (Study 2) object placed in a container. Then infants saw 2 objects retrieved (Study 1), or one added and one retrieved (Study 2). Conversely, in the False Belief (FB) condition the person saw only the retrieval of one object. Hence in Study 1 FB the person should believe that there is still an object present, while in Study 2 FB she should assume that the container is empty. In both studies in the True Belief conditions the person saw the entire sequence of events. Infants were then allowed to search in the container. Our data suggest that infants’ search times are influenced by the other person’s beliefs regarding the number of objects present at a target location. Infants tended to search more in the container if the other person (correctly, or falsely) believed an object to be present, compared to when she (correctly, or falsely) believed the object to be absent. Hence, infants successfully tracked the other person’s belief about the changing number of objects.

While it seems a tractable problem to ascribe beliefs to others about objects that are present in the environment, it might require more sophisticated representational capacities to compute beliefs regarding objects that ceased to exist. Using electrophysiological measures (event-related oscillations in the gamma frequency) we found activation suggesting that 8-month-old infants sustain an object representation that they ascribed to a person if she (mistakenly) believes the object to be present, even if infants themselves witnessed the object to disintegrate (and therefore know that it does not exist anymore). This shows that infants possess powerful representational abilities that enable them to ascribe sophisticated mental representations to others, and process these representations according to the other person’s perception and knowledge, independently of infants’ own stored representations.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 50 words || 
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2. Edkins, Jenny. "Objects Among Objects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314120_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Franz Fanon tells us that he "came into the world imbued with the will to find a meaning in things, [his] spirit filled with the desire to attain the source of the world" and then found that he was "an object in the midst of other objects." The paper expl

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 199 words || 
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3. Smirl, Lisa. "The Object(s) of Security: Object Based Learning in International Relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p499861_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Security studies and International Relations (IR) more broadly have tended to focus their research on representational forms of knowledge: historical accounts of events as told through archives, news media, interviews. While these approaches are well established within UK higher education, emerging pedagogy stresses the significant contribution that objects can make to students’ intellectual development (Bain & Ellenbogen, 2002; Tishman 2008). Although much of ‘object centered learning’ is focused on galleries and museums, this paper argues that the technique has wider pedagogic resonances, particularly with reference to teaching security.

Based on a graduate course at Sussex University the paper suggests that object based learning has four unique contributions to make to teaching security studies and IR. First, it shifts the way in which students engage with the subject material: how they frame key debates; engage in historic periodization; and identify causal factors and dynamics. Second, it is compatible with new theoretical possibilities for the discipline (Latour; Bennett; Barad; Neyrat). Thirdly, the use of objects engages international students who may be less comfortable with textually based approached. Finally, it illuminates issues such as migration, borders, and surveillance through active engagement with their built environments and technologies such as detention centers and embassies.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 12454 words || 
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4. Barley, William. and Leonardi, Paul. "Engineering Objects: The Strategic Production of Boundary Objects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p426279_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cross-functional teams foster collaboration by developing ‘boundary objects’ that focus discussion on a specific problem while remaining ambiguous enough to support multiple perspectives. Organizational literature characterizes boundary objects as emergent from cross-functional interaction. However, the concept of strategic ambiguity shows that people purposefully create ambiguity to their advantage. We perform an ethnographic study of automobile engineers to identify two strategies individuals use to construct ‘collaborative objects’ intended for use in cross-functional settings.

2016 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Ruhs, Theodora. "The Ghost of Objectivity in a Post-Objective World: How Local Maine Television Newsworkers Perceive Journalistic Norms in a Transitional Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1115216_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Submission (STUDENT)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research examines journalists’ attitudes towards traditional journalistic norms and standards within the context of new technological and economic realities. A preliminary analysis suggests that journalists continue to esteem traditional news standards, but are required to negotiate and redefine their practice in their relationship to local communities. The motivation behind this research is to expand the conversation on a transitioning journalistic field to include how individual perceptions of journalistic standards are part of that transition. The focus is on local news, in particular, as it appears to have increased potential for impacting conversations in local communities and nationally, with broader implications for influencing democratic processes. Recent statistics point to a resistance to the overall downward trends of traditional media. Local news continues to maintain audience and remain the number one source for news in the U.S. This project takes an interdisciplinary approach, using both social psychological and mass communication frameworks of attitudinal and news production research. It employs a mixed method approach using quantitative and qualitative analysis of surveys, interviews, and participant observations to examine the persistence of traditional journalistic standards, the perception of their role in production practice, and their importance within the newsroom.

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