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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8627 words || 
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1. Dill, Janette., Price-Glynn, Kim. and Rakovski, Carter. "Is There a Penalty for Caring? Careers of Men in Caring Occupations versus Male-dominated Occupations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724323_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research has shown that growing care work occupations are devalued in comparison to occupations that do not have a high percentage of female workers, with lower levels of compensation in occupations with similar skill levels. Blue-collar occupations have similar skill levels but are male dominated and subject to increased job losses and eroding wages in today’s economy. In this study, we examine how men in frontline health care occupations fare in comparison to men in blue collar occupations, asking whether men experience a “wage penalty” for performing care work. Using longitudinal data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation for the years 1996-2010, we examine the relationship between different job and occupational mobility patterns and wage outcomes for male frontline health care workers, focusing on which occupations offer higher wages and greater job stability. Our findings show that men in frontline health care occupations do have lower wages on average as compared to blue collar workers, with the exception of frontline allied health workers. However, male frontline health care workers are less likely to switch employers or occupations or to transition to unemployment, indicating that frontline health care jobs offer a higher degree of job stability for workers. Nonetheless, the findings suggest that men do experience a wage penalty for working in care work occupations.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 51 pages || Words: 11057 words || 
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2. Wilson, George. "Race and Downward Occupational Mobility from Upper-tier Occupations Across the Early Work-Career" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94531_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study uses data from the Panel Study of Income dynamics to assess hypotheses from the minority vulnerability thesis concerning racial differences in the incidence, magnitude, and determinants of downward occupational mobility from Managers/Administrators and Professional/Technical occupational categories across four years of the early work-career. Findings support the minority vulnerability thesis:African Americans, compared to similarly situated and credentialed Whites, had a higher rate of donward mobility, dropped further down the occupational ladder when experiencing downward mobility, and face a route to downward movement that is less strongly predicted by traditional stratification-based causal factors including background socioeconomic status, human capital credentials,and job/labor market characteristics. Subsequent analyses reveal that racial gaps in the incidence, mangitude, and determinants of downward mobility are more pronounced in the private than the public sector. Discussed are how the findings shed light on unresolved issues relating to racial inequality in the workplace.

2006 - Rural Sociological Society Words: 118 words || 
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3. Brooks, W., Toney, Michael. and Berry, E. "Occupational Aspirations and Migration: A Comparison of Rural Youth With High, Medium, and Low Occupational Aspirations and Their Chances for Migration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Seelbach Hilton Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky, Aug 10, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p115238_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: By using a social psychological approach, this research investigated whether occupational aspirations led to migration for rural youth. The research question this paper is: Are young to middle-aged adults in rural areas with higher occupational aspirations more likely to migrate out of rural areas than young to middle-aged adults with lower aspirations. The age group for this study is 14-35. Aspirations were measured using Duncan's socioeconomic index (SEI) with data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth in 1979. Results show that youth with high occupational aspirations migrate more than youth with medium and low occupational aspirations. They are more likely to reside in an urban county of residence in their middle ages.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 155 words || 
Info
4. Hook, Jennifer. and Pettit, Becky. "Reproducing Occupational Inequality: Marriage, Parenthood and the Gender Divide in Occupations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276167_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: It is well established that class and gender predict occupational placement across advanced industrialized countries. In exploratory analyses we document a third dimension to occupational segregation associated with family responsibilities, and consider explanations for cross-national variability in this dimension. Using data from ten countries contained in the Luxembourg Income Study we find that family responsibilities systematically influence occupational sorting, but do so differently for men and women. There is less variability in the effects of family status on men's occupational location than on women's across countries. Whereas family responsibilities consistently sort men into the highest pay levels of occupational categories, the pattern for women is bifurcated – with a hollowing out at the middle ranks. Using a novel set of national-level indicators, including data from the Multinational Time Use Survey, we find that the influence of family responsibilities on women’s occupational location is associated with prevailing standards for women’s domestic labor time.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9850 words || 
Info
5. Roos, Patricia. and Stevens, Lindsay. "Integrating Occupations: Changing Occupational Sex Segregation from 2000 to 2010" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724488_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We provide further insight into changing occupational sex segregation, digging more deeply
into what has happened since 2000. Specifically, we examine changing percentage female in
detailed occupational categories from 2000 to 2010. We look both to female integration into
male occupations (the traditional interest of researchers in this field), and to male integration into female occupations (less often studied). We also explore whether integration varies by location in the occupational structure, and/or by the socio‐demographic characteristics of
occupational incumbents.

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